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LDAR / Fugitive Emissions Prevention

Evaluation of Innovative Methane Detection Technologies

Tim Taylor - Colorado Air Pollution Control Division

Description

The Evaluation of Innovative Methane Detection Technologies summarizes the technical-regulatory guidance document of the same title published by the Interstate Technology & Regulatory Council (ITRC) in September 2018 (https://methane-1.itrcweb.org/). Over the last number of years, several state, national and international governments have passed or are considering methane emission regulations related to oil and natural gas production and distribution. Historically, gas detection technologies used to regulate fugitive emissions in the oil and gas sector had to comply with EPA’s Method 21 requirements. With the advent of optical gas imaging (OGI) technologies, EPA established an alternative work practice (AWP) to allow inclusion of manually operated infrared cameras for leak detection. EPA's amendments to the New Source Performance Standards (NSPS) on methane and volatile organic compounds (VOC) for oil and gas sources include Method 21 and OGI technologies as approved compliance methods, as well as the option for approving new leak detection technologies. Colorado and Pennsylvania allow similar options in their regulation of methane and VOC from oil and gas operations. In response, innovators are currently developing new technologies that go beyond Method 21 and OGI. However, there is no standard methodology or protocol to evaluate performance of new technologies like these as compared to Method 21 or OGI. The ITRC guidance document seeks to provide a framework for evaluating methane and VOC detection technologies for use in meeting existing and forthcoming leak regulations, assisting with inventory monitoring and reporting, and for enhancing safety. The document also identifies regulatory barriers and opportunities for new or innovative leak detection technologies. The guidance document does not purport to provide "the answer" on how to evaluate leak detection technologies, particularly in regard to determining equivalency of new technologies or methods with existing, approved technologies or methods. However, the document does provide a starting point in this ongoing challenge and discussion, which continues beyond the publication of the document and will be refined further over time, including through efforts such as the Path to Equivalency project being lead by the Methane Emissions Technology Evaluation Center (METEC) at Colorado State University, and the Canadian Environmental Protection Agency's Leak Detection Technology Equivalency framework currently under development.

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EHS Best Management Practices

Acoustic Condensate Stabilization

Stephen Saint Vincent - Saint & Tiller Technologies

Description

Acoustic Condensate Stabilization is a novel technique that is proving to be highly effective and efficient. The stabilization process is driven by dynamic pressure of an acoustic field, causing mass transport of high volatile species into gas phase. The process is non thermal, making it a much safer alternative. The overall process equipment is much simpler and less costly to operate.

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EHS Best Management Practices

EcoVapors Recovery Systems - Flare LESS Profit MORE

Michael J. McMahon - EcoVapors Recovery Systems

Description

Over the past several years, it has become clear that tank flash gas often contains oxygen, which gas gatherers and interstate pipelines have placed increasing tighter limits on due to its corrosive effect on their steel pipelines and processing plants. So, unless this rich gas can be removed from the oil before it enters the tanks, or the oxygen is removed from the gas, the entire tank flash gas stream is usually incinerated on site. That’s wasteful and generates unnecessary emissions, lost profits, and in some cases royalties, are the most tangible consequences of flaring tank vapor gas, but there are also environmental aspects. Even though the industry has made significant progress in reducing venting and flaring, regulators are having to take a closer look. Flaring significantly reduces site emissions of Volatile Organic Compounds, or VOCs. That’s a good thing. However, it also generates nitrogen oxides, or NOx, as a by-product of combustion, and that’s not good as it also contributes to the development of ground level ozone. In summary, burning off flash gas reduces VOCs, but also contributes to ozone pollution. Once the oxygen is removed, this rich, valuable gas stream can be sold to enhance profits. And, flaring only has to occur in the case of the rare emergency. Now that publicly-traded E&P companies are facing mounting pressure from their institutional shareholders to generate returns on capital instead of growing production at any cost, monetizing tank vapor gas to increase profits and boost returns seems like a no-brainer. Never mind the growing pressure from environmental activists. Removing oxygen from tank vapor gas just makes sense, and dollars too. At EcoVapor we have that solution it is the ZerO2.

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Oil & Gas

Design & Operation Guidelines for Low Heater Emissions

Erwin Platvoet - XRG Technologies, LLC

Description

The challenge to minimize emissions from a fired heater starts with good burner design, backed up by a properly executed burner test. But it doesn’t end there; the burner test only demonstrates the lowest theoretical emissions for a single burner under controlled conditions. In the field, however, several factors conspire against the designers and operators, occasionally resulting in emissions that are significantly higher than anticipated. This presentation will demonstrate how heater design, operation and maintenance can impact the actual emissions of pollutants and offers some practical guidelines for both designers and operators.

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Oil & Gas

Status/Updates on NSPS OOOOa

Karen Marsh - US EPA

Description

On October 15, 2018, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) proposed targeted improvements to the 2016 New Source Performance Standards (NSPS) for the Oil and Natural Gas Industry, including amendments to the fugitive emissions monitoring requirements in the rule. EPA accepted public comments on this proposal through December 17, 2018. This presentation will provide an overview of the proposal and information provided through the public comments.

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Oil & Gas

Oil and Gas Enforcement and Compliance Monitoring Update

Natalie Topinka & Kosta Loukeris - EPA

Description

This presentation will provide an overview of some of EPA’s recent enforcement cases and compliance monitoring activities at gas processing plants, production well pads, and pipeline pigging operations. The discussion will include field inspectors’ observations and areas of focus for improving operational best practices.

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LDAR / Fugitive Emissions Prevention

LDAR Case Study Comparison of Conventional Method 21 vs Alternative Work Practice

Terence Trefiak - Montrose Air Quality

Description

I am the Managing Director of Target Emission Services. We provide fugitive emission surveys for the natural gas industry (transmission, processing, storage and LNG). We specialize in using Optical Gas Imaging (OGI) to detect hydrocarbon leaks and vents for regulatory compliance (EPA Subpart W - Green House Gas). However, we have started to utilize OGI to meet our natural gas processing clients various LDAR requirements (EPA OOOO and KKK) by following the Method 21 Alternative Work Practice (AWP) which allows for the use of optical infrared hydrocarbon detection. This AWP was released to provide industry with an option to use Optical Gas Imaging to replace “conventional” TVA type LDAR equipment for Method 21 facility inspections. OGI uses a specialized filtered infrared camera to provide a real time video of hydrocarbon gas leaks that are invisible to the human eye. The camera can survey up to 1000-1500 components per hour (compared to only 50 components/hour with conventional equipment), surpassing both the efficiency and effectiveness of traditional hand held gas analyzers. In addition many components that are classified as difficult to monitor using conventional hand held equipment can be readily scanned at a distance with the camera. A video of each emission source can also be recorded to provide the exact location of the leak and helps to ensure that the correct repair actions are being made. The use of OGI is on average 10 – 20 times more efficient that conventional LDAR equipment presenting a significant cost savings.The main questions are, • Is the AWP approach as actually as effective as the conventional LDAR approach? • Why are most LDAR contractors not using the AWP approach?• What are the tangible benefits (cost, # and size of leaks detected, safety, etc.) of OGI vs Conventional?My presentation will attempt to answer these questions using actual case study data from 2 large gas processing facilities. The presentation will compare survey results from both OGI and conventional monitoring and show specific examples (survey cost/durations, leak videos, etc.)

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LDAR / Fugitive Emissions Prevention

Back from the Future

Don Kinder - MarkWest, Jake Fournier - Marathon, and Deever Bradley - ERM -

Description

MarkWest migrated away from the AWP for LDAR compliance monitoring. We left where everyone is trying to go and reverted back to M21 monitoring for our LDAR programs. Will have some stats and such to show the difference in leak % with OGI vs M21.

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EHS Best Management Practices

Isn’t It Ironic? A Case Study On Dry Seal vs. Wet Seal Centrifugal Compressor Emissions

Brandon Mogan - Montrose

Description

The EPA has been pushing hard for the conversion from wet- to dry-seal centrifugal compressors for decades in an attempt to reduce emissions from the natural gas industry. Ironically, the opposite may have happened. Data from a recent study by Tora Consulting on centrifugal compressors most commonly found in the industry indicates that emissions from dry seal units are orders of magnitude higher than emissions from their wet seal counterparts. This presentation will provide the ultimate example of “missing the forest for the trees”.

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Air Permitting

Optimizing NG Compressor Station Permitting

Joel LeBlanc - Ashworth Leininger Group

Description

This presentation puts forth a blueprint for a natural gas compressor station which maximizes compression capacity while maintaining an air emissions minor source status. The presentation will review common emissions sources, go into detail about equipment design considerations for minimizing emissions, and highlight best management practices.

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Air Permitting

Upstream Oil & Gas Air Permitting 101

Adrienne Rosecrans - Ashworth Leininger Group

Description

This presentation gives a high level overview of air permitting requirements for air emissions sources from the wellhead all the way through Midstream gas treatment facilities. The web of federal and state applicable air permitting and regulatory requirements can be complex to navigate. We will discuss permit applicable equipment types, current federal and state permitting programs and practices, some key best practices, and recent oil and gas industry developments.

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Oil & Gas

Upstream Oil & Gas Emissions Inventory Calculations

Danielle Nesvacil - TCEQ

Description

Coming soon.

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Oil & Gas

GHGSat, Methane Detection using Satellites

Stephanie Germain - GHGSat

Description

Coming soon.

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EHS Best Management Practices

Best Practices for Vapor Recovery Systems to Reduce Venting and Flaring with Economic Benefit

Jeff Voorhis - HY-BON

Description

Existing and evolving regulatory requirements require oil and gas producers to reduce venting and flaring of natural gas from their operations. Regulatory agencies tightening venting and flaring emissions include Environment Canada, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s (USEPA), U.S. Department of the Interior, state/province environmental and oil and gas mining regulatory agencies. These rules seek to minimize the loss of natural resources and to reduce air pollution emissions. The air pollutants of concern include volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and the greenhouse gases methane and carbon dioxide. The source of the natural gas is primarily flash gas liberated from the storage of crude oil and condensate. The presentation discusses the drivers for reducing venting and flaring and gives a step by step approach to vapor recovery from project identification to ultimate success in sending gas to a gathering or sales pipeline. The characteristics of storage tank vent gas are discussed. Steps include identifying project scope and emission standards, design data needs, best design practices, installation, commissioning and monitoring systems. The use of smart systems to measure and monitor system operation and the amount of gas recovered is included. Also covered is the design and use of vapor recovery towers (VRTs) to reduce the chance of oxygen entering the vapor recovery systems.Supplemental emission controls using vapor combustion units as backups to the vapor recovery system is also addressed. The presentation will also introduce new technologies used to automate the detection and reporting of leaks from open thief hatches used on storage tanks and Linear Rod Pumps.

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EHS Emerging Technologies

LUMEN Terrain - Continuous Ground-Based Digital Methane Monitoring

Dan Johnson - Baker Hughes GE

Description

Coming soon.

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EHS Emerging Technologies

LUMEN Sky - Aerial Drone-Based Digital Methane Monitoring

Dan Johnson - Baker Hughes

Description

Coming soon.

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Oil & Gas

HSE Buy-in, How to Get it and How to Give it

Tom Hutchins - Kinder Morgan

Description

Coming soon.

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Oil & Gas

Reducing Blowdown Emissions

Karen Nielsen - Kinder Morgan

Description

Coming soon.

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Oil & Gas

Do you have the Right Tank? Thief Hatch?

James Van Horne - SLR International Corporation

Description

Coming soon.

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Oil & Gas

Airborne LIDAR Pipeline Inspection Systems

Tim Goolsby - Lasen

Description

Coming soon.

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Oil & Gas

Drone Based OGI OOOOa (Quadcopter Drone)

Roy Massengale - Enrud

Description

Coming soon.

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Digital Transformation

Data Collection, Process Automation & Reporting Mobilized for Environmental Health & Safety

Jack Phur - Mobile Epiphany

Description

Coming soon.

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Digital Transformation

5 Reasons to Digitize your Oil & Gas Crews

Luke Carton - Parsable

Description

Giving O&G crews the digital tools to raise their performance is an overlooked opportunity of potentially immense proportions. You can generate incremental ROI with every job you digitize. Multiply that by all the complex nested jobs within your operations — and stretching across O&G value chains.

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Digital Transformation

Visible Emissions BACT – Digital Monitoring Technique for Opacity

Shawn Dolan - Virtual Technology

Description

This paper will review 10 years of the evolution of Visible and nuisance emission monitoring process. The evolution overview will include the national and international standards achieved and the operational status of digital visible emission management programs around the world. The paper will address implementation issues encountered and updates made to the standards to accommodate field operations. The paper will address the evolution of camera technology, and the use of the various, hand held, fixed mounted, mobile drones and personal cameras. The paper will explore the various ways these technologies are being used to manage Visible and Nuisance Emission programs around the Globe. The paper will discuss the pro's and con's of the various recording devices and the sources that require opacity monitoring. From the Early Warning System on the Freeway, to the monitoring of visibility on the street corner to estimate PM load, Digital Images continue to excel in the advancement of inexpensive wide area monitors. The paper will conclude with the comparison of the old to the new in terms of information quality and sustainability, while visualizing the path forward over the next decade.

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Oil & Gas

Quadcopter Drones, Fixed Wing Drone, Helicopters, or Fixed Wing Plane?

David Furry - Leak Surveys Inc.

Description

Coming soon.

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Oil & Gas

Industry Programs Panel

Matt Todd - The Environmental Partnership, Richard Hyde - ONE Future, Isable Mogstad - Environmental Defense Fund -

Description

Coming soon.

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Oil & Gas

Diversity & Leadership Panel

Sucheta Gokhale - HollyFrontier, Maury Dobbie - Colorado Research Collaboratory, Uzi Ibrahim - 4C Marketplace -

Description

Coming soon.

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Oil & Gas

MethaneSAT 2021 Satellite Methane Detection Coming Soon

Tom Ingersol - Environmental Defense Fund

Description

Coming soon.

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Oil & Gas

Satellite-based Hyperspectral Analysis for Emissions Detection, Integrity Monitoring and Compliance

Tushar Prabhakar, Peter Weaver, & Tushar Prabhakar - Orbital Sidekick

Description

Analysis of hyperspectral imagery (HSI), collected by micro-satellite, is poised to provide unparalleled global daily leak and emissions detection capability for the chemical, oil and gas industries. Space-based HSI offers an ability to directly find leaks, detect threatening construction activity, identify physical changes to soil and vegetation caused by leaked product, and even distinguish between specific hydrocarbon liquids or vapors. In this presentation, OSK will discuss the state-of-the-art for using HSI to detect fugitive emissions. It will provide examples of inspection findings using Spectral IntelligenceTM. And, it will provide insight on how HSI can improve the operator’s ability to cost-effectively understand the conditions at and around their assets.

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Oil & Gas

Applications and Field Results for Quantitative Optical Gas Imaging

Jon Morris - Providence Photonics

Description

Coming soon.

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Oil & Gas

Methane Data Collection, Gas Infrastructure, Transformational Analytics, Actionable Results

Chris Rella, Aaron Van Pelt - Picarro

Description

Coming soon.

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Oil & Gas

Laser Dispersion Spectroscopy – Large Area Fugitive Monitoring

Mohammed Belal - Mirico

Description

Coming soon.

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Oil & Gas

Gas Mapping LiDAR (GML) Methane Emission Quantification & Operational Efficiency

Peter Roos - Bridger Photonics

Description

Coming soon.

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