Environmental Compliance Presentations for Refining, Chemical, Oil & Gas
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Chemical

Environmental Enforcement Developments in the Trump Administration

Matt Thurlow - Baker & Hostetler LLP

Description

This presentation will provide an overview of recent environmental enforcement developments in the Trump administration. The presentation will review EPA's new National Compliance Initiatives, regulatory changes under the Clean Air Act, and other pending changes under Acting Administrator Wheeler's EPA. The presentation also will focus on technological developments and how they are changing compliance and enforcement.

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Air Permitting

A False Sense of Security - Shifts in EPA’s Implementation of PSD Capable of Accommodating Determination and The Demand Growth Exclusion

Everard Ashworth - Ashworth Leininger Group

Description

The 2002 NSR Reforms provided additional flexibility to exclude emissions from existing operations; however, EPA provided little guidance as to how this emissions calculus is to be performed. Come hear the insight gained by the presenter during recent experience in performing a complex and detailed PSD applicability evaluation in the context of utilizing the Demand Growth Exclusion.

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Best Management Practices

How Do You Feel About Storing Your Emissions Data in the Cloud?

Matthew Radigan - REGS, LLC

Description

Cloud computing means storing and accessing data and programs over the Internet instead of your computer's hard drive. In order to implement a cloud solution, you need some basic tools to connect your data source(s) to the Internet. Connection to the cloud storage needs to be secure, reliable and accessible. Turn on any new WiFi enable device, click through some prompts and you are connected. Technology made it so easy that it doesn’t even require a conscious thought to participate. Will the same environment that drives my social life translate to my workplace and more importantly, help me successful manage my critical air emissions compliance data. Required tools, feasibility and practicality of using cloud computing for compliance applications will be covered during the presentation.

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CEMS

Common CEMS Program Audit Findings

Eric Wiley - VIM Technologies

Description

Issues of non-compliance and poor system performance are frequently discovered during CEMS program audits. The presentation will also focus on best practice implementation that can assist facilities in ensuring that their CEMS programs are compliant with applicable regulatory requirements and help utilize limited resources as efficiently as possible. Real world examples of CEMS audit findings will be outlined and ways to avoid such issues will be discussed.

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LDAR

Evaluation of Innovative Methane Detection Technologies

Tim Taylor - Colorado Air Pollution Control Division

Description

The Evaluation of Innovative Methane Detection Technologies summarizes the technical-regulatory guidance document of the same title published by the Interstate Technology & Regulatory Council (ITRC) in September 2018 (https://methane-1.itrcweb.org/). Over the last number of years, several state, national and international governments have passed or are considering methane emission regulations related to oil and natural gas production and distribution. Historically, gas detection technologies used to regulate fugitive emissions in the oil and gas sector had to comply with EPA’s Method 21 requirements. With the advent of optical gas imaging (OGI) technologies, EPA established an alternative work practice (AWP) to allow inclusion of manually operated infrared cameras for leak detection. EPA's amendments to the New Source Performance Standards (NSPS) on methane and volatile organic compounds (VOC) for oil and gas sources include Method 21 and OGI technologies as approved compliance methods, as well as the option for approving new leak detection technologies. Colorado and Pennsylvania allow similar options in their regulation of methane and VOC from oil and gas operations. In response, innovators are currently developing new technologies that go beyond Method 21 and OGI. However, there is no standard methodology or protocol to evaluate performance of new technologies like these as compared to Method 21 or OGI. The ITRC guidance document seeks to provide a framework for evaluating methane and VOC detection technologies for use in meeting existing and forthcoming leak regulations, assisting with inventory monitoring and reporting, and for enhancing safety. The document also identifies regulatory barriers and opportunities for new or innovative leak detection technologies. The guidance document does not purport to provide "the answer" on how to evaluate leak detection technologies, particularly in regard to determining equivalency of new technologies or methods with existing, approved technologies or methods. However, the document does provide a starting point in this ongoing challenge and discussion, which continues beyond the publication of the document and will be refined further over time, including through efforts such as the Path to Equivalency project being lead by the Methane Emissions Technology Evaluation Center (METEC) at Colorado State University, and the Canadian Environmental Protection Agency's Leak Detection Technology Equivalency framework currently under development.

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Best Management Practices

Acoustic Condensate Stabilization

Stephen Saint Vincent - Saint & Tiller Technologies

Description

Acoustic Condensate Stabilization is a novel technique that is proving to be highly effective and efficient. The stabilization process is driven by dynamic pressure of an acoustic field, causing mass transport of high volatile species into gas phase. The process is non thermal, making it a much safer alternative. The overall process equipment is much simpler and less costly to operate.

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CEMS

CEMS Lessons Learned

Ty Smith - Cemtek Group Inc.

Description

CEMTEK KVB-Enertec is a System Integrator and full service organization that builds & supports continuous emissions monitoring systems (CEMS) to meet EPA 40 CFR Part 60, 64, & 75 regulatory requirements and process control monitoring systems on a variety of applications and sources including chemical, cement, glass, refinery, power, biomass, paper, and many others. In this paper we will discuss lessons learned when testing, purchasing and deploying new monitoring technologies to measure NOx, SO2, CO, HCl, NH3, H2S, HF, HCN using lasers & DOAS compared to conventional technologies ranging from Dry Extractive, Dilution, Hot Wet, and In-situ for compliance and process monitoring.

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Flares for Regulatory Compliance

Back from the Future

Don Kinder - MarkWest, Jake Fournier - Marathon, and Deever Bradley - ERM -

Description

MarkWest migrated away from the AWP for LDAR compliance monitoring. We left where everyone is trying to go and reverted back to M21 monitoring for our LDAR programs. Will have some stats and such to show the difference in leak % with OGI vs M21.

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LDAR

LDAR Case Study Comparison of Conventional Method 21 vs Alternative Work Practice

Terence Trefiak - Montrose Air Quality

Description

I am the Managing Director of Target Emission Services. We provide fugitive emission surveys for the natural gas industry (transmission, processing, storage and LNG). We specialize in using Optical Gas Imaging (OGI) to detect hydrocarbon leaks and vents for regulatory compliance (EPA Subpart W - Green House Gas). However, we have started to utilize OGI to meet our natural gas processing clients various LDAR requirements (EPA OOOO and KKK) by following the Method 21 Alternative Work Practice (AWP) which allows for the use of optical infrared hydrocarbon detection. This AWP was released to provide industry with an option to use Optical Gas Imaging to replace “conventional” TVA type LDAR equipment for Method 21 facility inspections. OGI uses a specialized filtered infrared camera to provide a real time video of hydrocarbon gas leaks that are invisible to the human eye. The camera can survey up to 1000-1500 components per hour (compared to only 50 components/hour with conventional equipment), surpassing both the efficiency and effectiveness of traditional hand held gas analyzers. In addition many components that are classified as difficult to monitor using conventional hand held equipment can be readily scanned at a distance with the camera. A video of each emission source can also be recorded to provide the exact location of the leak and helps to ensure that the correct repair actions are being made. The use of OGI is on average 10 – 20 times more efficient that conventional LDAR equipment presenting a significant cost savings.The main questions are, • Is the AWP approach as actually as effective as the conventional LDAR approach? • Why are most LDAR contractors not using the AWP approach?• What are the tangible benefits (cost, # and size of leaks detected, safety, etc.) of OGI vs Conventional?My presentation will attempt to answer these questions using actual case study data from 2 large gas processing facilities. The presentation will compare survey results from both OGI and conventional monitoring and show specific examples (survey cost/durations, leak videos, etc.)

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Best Management Practices

Contractor Management

Ric Hartung - Process & Safety Solutions LLC

Description

Currently there are a large number of facilities covered by Process Safety Management (PSM) that either use a third party or manage their own contractor safety programs. Numerous compliance audits and National Emphasis Program (NEP) inspections has revealed a serious gap. While these third parties may do an adequate to good job in obtaining contractor information, evaluating statistics, and managing documentation, most fail to meet the requirement outlined in the PSM Regulation regarding contractor evaluations and verification. This gap leaves the host employer vulnerable to significant OSHA & EPA violations and fines. At issue, is the requirements outlined in several sections in the PSM regulation starting in sub-section (f)(4) stating that “the employer shall develop and implement safe work practices to provide for the control of hazards during operations such as lockout-tagout; confined space entry; opening process equipment or piping; and control over entrance into a facility by maintenance, contractor, laboratory, or other support personnel. These safe work practices shall apply to employees and contractor employees” (emphasis added). This indicates that the host employer’s safe work practices apply to not only its own employees, but also to the contractors that perform work in the covered process. The host employer responsibilities are further outlined in sub-section (h)(2)(v) such that “The employer shall periodically evaluate the performance of contract employers in fulfilling their obligations as specified in paragraph (h)(3) of this section. For the host to fulfill PSM obligations regarding contractors, it must verify that the contractor has received safe work practice training, including site-specific requirements, such as but not limited to, the potential hazards that may be present in the facility. The contractor may use their own safe work practices, but this would need to be agreed upon beforehand and the host “must” evaluate each safe work practice to ensure that they are equivalent or more stringent, than their own.

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2020

Calculating Project Increases

Johnny Vermillion - Spirit Environmental

Description

Do you find Major New Source Review applicability confusing? Have you noticed that even the initial step of trying to figure out project increases (much less the rest of the program) already starts to descend into a confusing mess? When it comes to calculating project increases these days, the “devil is in the details”. This presentation will provide background and suggested approaches on the new the EPA guidelines along with insight on some states’ decision on implementation.

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Chemical

Understanding Cooled vs Uncooled Optical Gas Imaging

Ron Lucier and Craig O’Neill - FLIR

Description

For over a decade, FLIR Systems has manufactured infrared cameras to visualize gas leaks of various kinds. These optical gas imaging (OGI) cameras are developed to “see” a variety of gases including hydrocarbons, carbon dioxide, sulfur hexafluoride, refrigerants, carbon monoxide, ammonia and more. These imagers are used to mitigate emissions, increase production efficiency, ensure safe work environments and more by a variety of industries. One great advantage of OGI cameras compared to other inspection technologies is the speed in which the technology can locate leaking components while not interrupting the industrial process. Historically OGI cameras have been designed with cooled infrared detectors that offer several advantages over uncooled thermal detectors but often come with a higher cost. Advancements in the technology of uncooled detectors have allowed the OGI camera manufacturers like FLIR to design and develop lower cost OGI solutions for these industries. While these are often lower in cost, there are some limitations versus imagers with cooled detectors. This paper will explain the differences in the two detector technologies and compare advantages/disadvantages of both.

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CEMS

Common CEMS RATA Failures and Risks

Paula Metz - Alliance Source Testing

Description

This presentation will focus on thing that may cause a CEMS RATA to fail and what can be done on the facility side and by the stack tester to reduce the potential for failures.

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Chemical

Federal, State and Local Enforcement

James Smith - Crain, Caton, & James

Description

The presentation will highlight recent federal environmental enforcement trends and update state and local enforcement developments.

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CEMS

Simplifying CEM Reporting:The Revolution in Data Acquisition & Handling

Brian Fowler - ESC

Description

This session will provides a quick overview of current pressures that are requiring earlier and more accurate data validation, compliance averaging and recordkeeping. Then we’ll look at how a Data Acquisition and Handling Systems (DAS or DAHS) makes validated averages available immediately after acquisition for CEMS, COMS and CPMS. How does this change the flow and use of compliance data? Finally we’ll dig into passages from the RSR changes to MACT CC to examine the details of how different the recordkeeping and reporting for this rule will be as we enter the first year of compliance. Whatever solution you are planning to use, this session should provide helpful insight.

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Best Management Practices

Reducing Well Pad Air Emissions

Jeffrey Wilson - EcoVapors Recovery Systems

Description

The U.S. EPA promulgated Clean Air Act regulations for upstream oil and gas facilities initially in 2011. While these regulations have been amended and expanded on several occasions to cover a variety of sources, emission data from upstream oil and gas facilities indicate that vapor resulting from the pressure drop from separation represents the largest single source of VOCs. Initial focus was on controlling or destroying the VOCs, although recovery of the rich gas is also a potential source of additional profit. The presentation compares and contrasts several of the standard methods for addressing these emissions from atmospheric storage and presents new technology for optimizing profitability while significantly reducing emissions and flaring. The effectiveness of reducing emissions of criteria pollutants as well as greenhouse gas emissions is also contrasted.

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Air Permitting

EPA NSR Reforms: How to Capitalize Now and Later

Kristin Gordon - ALL4 Inc.

Description

This presentation will provide an overview of the most challenging issues posed by the New Source Review (NSR) construction permitting program for expansion projects. The key aspects of NSR will be summarized along with how they fit in with real world projects (and what makes them most challenging for real world projects). The discussion will then lead to the common sense regulatory and policy reforms that are needed to address these challenges. Finally, we will discuss the current status and anticipated implementation of upcoming reforms to the NSR program by Congress and U.S. EPA. This presentation could serve as an overview for those following the regulatory reform process and also as a primer to those that are attending the in depth NSR workshops.

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Best Management Practices

Auditing in the New Decade: Creating Value by Reducing Environmental Liabilities and Risks

Tim Wilkins & Eric Hodek - Bracewell LLP & Ramboll

Description

Environmental liabilities pose significant risks in mergers, acquisitions, and ongoing concerns. Our presenters will discuss practical strategies for stakeholders, owners, or operators to leverage audit protections to strengthen their financial position.

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CEMS

Particulate Testing: Modern Solutions to Modern Limits

Justin Sullivan - Alliance Source Testing

Description

Particulate matter (PM) with diameters less than 10 and 2.5 micrometers pose a significant health risk to local communities. Because of this, regulations regarding PM 10 and PM 2.5 are ever increasing. The methodology used to test for PM is advancing to meet the needs of modern standards. Other Test Method (OTM) 37 offers a superior approach to PM testing as compared to traditional sampling techniques. This discussion will take an in depth look at several side by side comparisons of data from OTM 37 and traditional sampling methods. Topics discussed will include reduced test time, greater analytical sensitivity, and decreased bias from interferents.

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Air Permitting

Upstream Oil & Gas Air Permitting 101

Adrienne Rosecrans - Ashworth Leininger Group

Description

This presentation gives a high level overview of air permitting requirements for air emissions sources from the wellhead all the way through Midstream gas treatment facilities. The web of federal and state applicable air permitting and regulatory requirements can be complex to navigate. We will discuss permit applicable equipment types, current federal and state permitting programs and practices, some key best practices, and recent oil and gas industry developments.

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Chemical

Cloud Based LDAR Solutions for Fugitive Emissions Compliance

Christopher Tucker - InspectionLogic

Description

In this presentation we will go over the current state of LDAR technology, including both hardware and software, and showcase emerging technologies that will dramatically shape the future workflows and efficiencies of the LDAR industry. From new mobile devices that allow for far more functionality than past generations to brand new technology that is still 2 - 5 years away from reaching mainstream, such as augmented reality. This presentation is aimed to not only get people prepared for the future and how our workflows will change but also to get people excited about the future of LDAR and the advancements that are coming, including heads up displays so you can have both hands free to monitor.

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Chemical

How Digital Transformation Can Impact Compliance for Environmental and Safety Regulation

Marcio Donnangelo, Steve Probst - Emerson Automation Solutions

Description

This presentation will give you an overview of how Digital Transformation is eliminating layers of complexity to bring pre–interpreted field data directly to those who need to make decisions and take action. Two examples will be highlighted: Environmental reporting involves flow measurements which must be verified to be accurate. Discovery of an inaccurate measurement can be costly for operators as they may pay fines from the last date they can prove accurate measurement. Meter verification tools make it simple and convenient to prove accuracy over time. Operators will be notified of problems immediately to avoid misreporting and allowing for immediate corrective action. PRVs are no longer isolated mechanical devices that rely on manual rounds as part of a preventive maintenance program. Release and leakage alerts can be wirelessly monitored, and then integrated into reporting and analytical systems. Powerful tools are now available to interpret these patterns and predict future releases before they occur.

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Best Management Practices

Design & Operation Guidelines for Low Heater Emissions

Erwin Platvoet - XRG Technologies, LLC

Description

The challenge to minimize emissions from a fired heater starts with good burner design, backed up by a properly executed burner test. But it doesn’t end there; the burner test only demonstrates the lowest theoretical emissions for a single burner under controlled conditions. In the field, however, several factors conspire against the designers and operators, occasionally resulting in emissions that are significantly higher than anticipated. This presentation will demonstrate how heater design, operation and maintenance can impact the actual emissions of pollutants and offers some practical guidelines for both designers and operators.

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Chemical

Turnaround LDAR Best Management Practices

Jeff Diehl - Think Environmental

Description

Description coming soon.

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Emerging Technology

Applications and Field Results for Quantitative Optical Gas Imaging

Jon Morris - Providence Photonics

Description

Optical Gas Imaging (OGI) is gaining traction as the best available Leak Detection and Repair technology(LDAR) for the detection of fugitive emissions. The NSPS OOOOa regulations, for the first time, have allowed for OGI as the primary LDAR technology. In addition, the emerging field of Quantitative Optical Gas imaging (QOGI) has opened up new applications and new possibilities for OGI. A recent QOGI method which allows operators to determine emission rates using a handheld optical gas imager. The technology has been tested and validated through various field studies and independent testing.This presentation will discuss applications and field testing results for QOGI in the upstream oil and gas industry. QOGI results are compared to known release rates and other quantitative methods. Applications for QOGI in both upstream and downstream oil and gas and petrochemical industries. Comparisons are made between available quantification technologies in the context of Leak Detection and Repair.

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Air Permitting

Optimizing NG Compressor Station Permitting

Joel LeBlanc - Ashworth Leininger Group

Description

This presentation puts forth a blueprint for a natural gas compressor station which maximizes compression capacity while maintaining an air emissions minor source status. The presentation will review common emissions sources, go into detail about equipment design considerations for minimizing emissions, and highlight best management practices.

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Best Management Practices

Best Practices for Vapor Recovery Systems to Reduce Venting and Flaring with Economic Benefit

Jeff Voorhis - HY-BON

Description

Existing and evolving regulatory requirements require oil and gas producers to reduce venting and flaring of natural gas from their operations. Regulatory agencies tightening venting and flaring emissions include Environment Canada, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s (USEPA), U.S. Department of the Interior, state/province environmental and oil and gas mining regulatory agencies. These rules seek to minimize the loss of natural resources and to reduce air pollution emissions. The air pollutants of concern include volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and the greenhouse gases methane and carbon dioxide. The source of the natural gas is primarily flash gas liberated from the storage of crude oil and condensate. The presentation discusses the drivers for reducing venting and flaring and gives a step by step approach to vapor recovery from project identification to ultimate success in sending gas to a gathering or sales pipeline. The characteristics of storage tank vent gas are discussed. Steps include identifying project scope and emission standards, design data needs, best design practices, installation, commissioning and monitoring systems. The use of smart systems to measure and monitor system operation and the amount of gas recovered is included. Also covered is the design and use of vapor recovery towers (VRTs) to reduce the chance of oxygen entering the vapor recovery systems.Supplemental emission controls using vapor combustion units as backups to the vapor recovery system is also addressed. The presentation will also introduce new technologies used to automate the detection and reporting of leaks from open thief hatches used on storage tanks and Linear Rod Pumps.

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Air Permitting

Recent TCEQ Permitting and Modeling Changes – Lessons Learned and Future Strategies

Frank Dougherty - ALL4 Inc.

Description

The Texas Commission on Environmental Quality (TCEQ) has enacted impactful changes to the way it requires permitting and modeling projects to be completed and submitted. These changes, most of which are required by June 2019, include the introduction of several new air permitting and modeling spreadsheets designed to streamline the air permitting process. During this presentation, we will summarize, review lessons learned, and provide examples on how to use these new workbooks, which are intended to significantly reduce the amount of TCEQ spends reviewing applications.

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Best Management Practices

Barr will demonstrate its free Microsoft Excel spreadsheet tools for storage tank emissions, LDAR program review and compliance reporting, and MACT CC flare NHVcz standards

Corey Mead - Barr Engineering

Description

Description coming soon

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Best Management Practices

Methane Emissions - Adopting a find it, fix it mentality!

Scott Wallis - Score Valves

Description

When companies detect a fugitive emission on their asset, it usually gets added to a leak register for repair at the next convenient opportunity. Because so many "weeps" can exist at any one time, if the repair program is not efficient and weeps are not repaired in a timely manner, this not only costs the asset money and affects performance, it becomes a serious safety and environmental issue. If just one leak was to escalate and shut the plant down, this has a huge financial cost and knock on impact. The message - It can be avoided if we find and repair our weeps regularly.

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Oil & Gas

Kinder Morgan Methane Reduction Activities: Where are We Now and Where Do We Go From Here

Karen Nielsen - Kinder Morgan

Description

Karen will discuss how Kinder Morgan started methane reduction activities, achievements to date, and plans for improving programs going forward.

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Best Management Practices

Do you have the Right Tank? Thief Hatch?

James Van Horne - SLR International Corporation

Description

Coming soon.

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Drones

Drone Based OGI OOOOa (Quadcopter Drone)

Roy Massengale - Enrud

Description

Coming soon.

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LDAR

Holistic Asset Management Using Methane Data & Analytics

Aaron Van Pelt - Picarro

Description

Advances in mobile methane detection technology and analytics allow natural gas emissions data to be collected at a speed and scale not previously possible. Concurrent advances in “Big Data” Analytics allow better-informed conclusions to be drawn from that data and action taken. Such data-driven decisions are showing substantial financial benefits in pipe replacement, risk reduction, leak survey and emissions reduction. Methane data can be collected across a natural gas network and then used for multiple applications – an example being annual patrols to find and repair the highest-emitting leaks wherein secondary uses of the same data might be for improved prioritization of pipeline replacement projects and for risk-based leak survey. This revolution in the rapid, wide-scale collection and use of methane data is driving gas operators to use it in all aspects of how they manage their assets.

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Air Permitting

Launcher and Receiver Consent Decree

Rob McHale & Jake Fournier - MPLX G&P & Marathon

Description

MPLX LP, through its subsidiaries MarkWest Liberty Midstream & Resources, L.L.C. and Ohio Gathering Company, L.L.C., has entered into a first-of-its-kind agreement with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania and the U.S. Department of Justice to implement design and operating improvements at pipeline launcher and receiver stations. As a result of these best management practices, emissions from these operations are expected to be reduced by as much as 85 percent. As part of the agreement, we are sharing our proprietary designs for “pig ramps” to minimize liquid loss during pig retrieval and information on the installation of depressure systems to reduce the pressure in the launcher/receiver chamber prior to opening.

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Chemical

Ultra-Low Steam Consumption, High Capacity Smokeless Flare

Clayton Francis - Zeeco

Description

This paper will introduce the technology behind, test data for, and industry challenges addressed by a new Ultra-Low Steam Consumption, High Capacity Smokeless Flare design developed by Zeeco, Inc. This flare technology is designed to further improve flaring efficiency and reduce steam consumption while continuing to meet the EPA Code of Federal Regulations, Chapter 1, Subchapter C, Part 63, Subpart CC requirements. We will focus on how the design addresses known industry challenges in high capacity, low steam consumption flaring, such as needing the ability to operate at low flare gas pressure since many applications have a maximum flare gas pressure at the flare tip of 3 psig. The paper will detail how this new design can achieve as low as 0.17 lbs. steam / lbs. flare gas at 20% of maximum flow rate, with the maximum flow rate achieved at a flare gas pressure of 3 psig. The above data is based upon a 5 mph wind with less than Ringlemann 1 opacity and a flare gas that is 100% propylene. For smokeless operation with propylene, other current steam assisted flare designs require approximately 0.5 lbs. steam / lbs. flare gas and / or a much higher flare gas pressure at maximum flaring capacity. Ultra-Low Consumption Steam Assisted Flaring is very important since any reduction in the required steam flow rate saves not only money, but also reduces the emissions produced from the production of the required higher steam flows. A key feature of this technology is that the air and steam mixture leave the flare at the same elevation as the flare tip exit, meaning no pre-mixing of air into the flare stream. Other current industry designs mix the air and steam with the flare gas prior to exiting the flare tip, negatively impacting the NHVcz according to the new calculation parameters required by MACT CC. Zeeco’s design more efficiently mixes the steam and air together and then mixes the resulting stream with the flare gas, creating a final mixture with a significantly increased volume of air. When the resulting mixture interacts with the flare gas at the tip exit, the increased air volume is readily available for combustion, meaning the flare is less likely to smoke. Since the design more efficiently mixes the air and steam together, less steam is required to achieve smokeless operation. Furthermore, the inherent efficiency of the mixing delivers a design less dependent upon using flare gas pressure to achieve smokeless operation. The flare can successfully operate at lower gas pressures at maximum flow rate.

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Chemical

Does CZNHV Track Flare Performance?

Yousheng Zeng - Providence Photonics

Description

The new Refinery Sector Rule (RSR) promulgated on December 1, 2015 requires facilities to continuously monitor Combustion Zone Net Heating Value (CZNHV) and flare tip velocity as a way to ensure high combustion efficiency (CE) and destruction efficiency (DE) of flares. The deadline for complying with these new requirements will be January 30, 2019. An experiment has been conducted on a steam assisted flare and an air assisted flare to evaluate CE under various vent gas and steam/air assist conditions with varying CZNHV and flare tip velocities. The CE was measured by both extractive sampling method and a new remote and continuous flare CE monitoring method – Video Imaging Spectro-Radiometry (VISR). The CE measured by both methods were examined along with the associatedCZNHV. The results show that high flare CE can be achieved with low CZNHV, much lower than the regulatory limits established in the RSR. The effectiveness of CZNHV as a suitable surrogate parameter for flare CE is examined within the regulatory context of the RSR regulations.

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Air Permitting

Permitting for a Successful LDAR Program

Brandon Mogan - Tora Consulting, LLC

Description

Leak Detection and Repair (LDAR) is often an afterthought during the permitting phase of a project. Common issues include: underestimated counts of fugitive emission components (valves, flanges, etc.), application of LDAR program reduction efficiencies to components that aren’t monitored, overgeneralized stream compositions, and lack of design team knowledge with respect to LDAR requirements. Failure to address these issues can result in significant penalties, underscored by numerous consent decrees issued by EPA over the past few years. The presentation will discuss best practices to address these common issues based experience with permitting and LDAR program implementation at various facilities in the US.

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Chemical

It's Not Dead, It's Mostly Dead - CD Termination

Suzanne Murray - HaynesBoone

Description

What is the process for terminating a consent decree with EPA and the Department of Justice? Is the process improved in this Administration or are terminations still stalled by disagreements over terms and what does "done" mean? This presentation will walk through the current overview of PRI CDs that have been terminated and lessons learned for those still open and for future agreements.

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Best Management Practices

Leak Management - LeakDAS Case Study

Derek Reese - ExxonMobil

Description

Description coming soon.

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LDAR

40 CFR 60 Subpart OOOOa - EPA Update

Karen Marsh - US EPA

Description

Description coming soon.

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Chemical

Leveraging Digital Twin technology to reduce inspection-related defects and optimize your LDAR program

Boun Sananikone, David Tullos - Bureau Veritas

Description

LDAR programs are based upon accurate inspections, timely repair, and proper identification of required components which need to monitored. Without the aforementioned, components working in parallel, your program maybe missing critical inspection points. Learn how Bureau Veritas is improving internal quality and helping our clients develop world-class fugitive emissions programs through our methodology.

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Chemical

Advantages of Hot-Filter Cooled OGI technology for Leak Detection and Quantification

Ram Hashmonay - Opgal

Description

The ability to manually replace or automatically swap filters in an OGI camera provide many advantages for various OGI applications. This presentation reviews several OGI applications, where swapping the filter provides better detection sensitivity, longer range, compounds' classification, and more accurate quantification.

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Chemical

The Transformation of LDAR: Predictive Leak Management Software

Brian Whitley - Emission Monitoring Service, Inc. (EMSI)

Description

Description coming soon.

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Best Management Practices

Converting Your Emissions to Electricity and More

Mark Lancaster - Baker Hughes

Description

Baker Hughes is at the forefront of the next wave of smart and efficient energy technologies that help operators discover and produce oil and gas. Technology enabling the electrification of surface facilities and pressure pumping equipment offering significant potential for operational and efficiency gains.

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Air Permitting

What to Aggregate: Geographic and Temporal Considerations in Identifying Major Modifications

Eric Groten and Eric Hodek - Vinson & Elkins and Ramboll

Description

Our presenters will discuss implications of defining your project, both spatially and temporally, for PSD permitting providing some information and insight on aggregation issues and strategies to facilitate project aggregation reviews. The Clean Air Act imposes PSD preconstruction permitting requirements on new major sources or modifications at existing major sources. Determination of “major” in both of these contexts relies on defining the scope of your project, both spatially and temporally. With “aggregation” being informed by state and federal guidance, policy, and case interpretations, project reviews and roles have become quite complex and pose risk to project schedules and economics. This presentation will provide some information insight on aggregation issues and strategies to facilitate project aggregation reviews.

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LDAR

ZEVAC® - Reducing gas released during routine operations & maintenance

Brad Sando - TPE Midstream

Description

Intentional release of natural gas during routine operations and maintenance has been identified by the US House Pipeline Safety Bill as an area to implement best-available technology for capturing released gas. Make ZEVAC® your BAT/BACT for reducing or eliminating release activity, as it was designed specifically to handle high frequency, low volume events keeping the gas safely in the piping system. Look to ZEVAC® to reduce or eliminate emissions throughout the value chain, whether you’re upstream, gathering, transmission, storage or distribution. For NGL operators, ZEVAC® Q is an industry first compressor technology capable of handling both liquid and vapor phase. Q is a safe alternative to thermal controls and flaring.

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Chemical

EPA AWP Update

Karen Marsh - US EPA

Description

Description coming soon.

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Oil & Gas

HSE Buy-in, How to Give it, How to Get it, and How to Keep it.

Tom Hutchins - Kinder Morgan

Description

We all have great ideas, but many fail to get accepted by management and others fail after initial implementation challenges. Getting and keeping senior management buy-in and support are critical success factors for any project or program. The presentation will provide insights into key elements of obtaining senior management buy-in and the keeping the support during the implementation and operations phases of projects.

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Best Management Practices

Data Collection, Process Automation & Reporting Mobilized for Environmental Health & Safety

Jack Phur - Mobile Epiphany

Description

Every business has unique challenges in streamlining their processes and reducing their cost. Mobile Epiphany never loses sight of this objective. Our innovative Rapid Application Configuration (RAC) platform allows us to help organizations solve their most complex operational challenges and pain points. Most importantly, our approach to rapid implementation allows our customers to start solving their problems quickly.

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Oil & Gas

Diversity & Leadership Panel

Sucheta Gokhale - HollyFrontier, Maury Dobbie - Colorado Research Collaboratory, Uzi Ibrahim - 4C Marketplace -

Description

Coming soon.

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Fired Heater Flooding

Douglas Basquez - HollyFrontier (Ret.)

Description

Serious incidents continue to occur in the process industries. 1 In particular, fired heater incidents can be very hazardous with the potential for equipment damage, severe injuries, and even fatalities. 2 This is not a new phenomenon as fired heaters have been used for many years and incidents have occurred over that entire span. Despite best efforts, there are many accounts of fired heaters having ruptured tubes, fires, and explosions. These incidents range from minor excursions with no significant damage to the heater, to very violent occurrences with serious consequences. One way to help reduce these incidents is to share best practices within the industry 3 which is the purpose of this paper.Because fired heaters have been used for decades, a great deal of knowledge and experience has been gained regarding safe operation. This information has been compiled into industry standards, recommended practices and guidelines, technical papers, and books. 4,5 For example, the American Petroleum Institute (API) develops relevant standards that provide guidelines for safely operating heaters. API Recommended Practice 535 6 provides detailed information on safe process burner operation. Despite these detailed guidelines, incidents continue to occur.One particular type of heater problem is referred to as flooding where too much fuel enters a heater without enough oxygen to properly combust that fuel. There are many possible causes for this such as over-firing burners, inadequate air flow coming through the burners, changes in fuel composition, and tube ruptures. There has been increased interest in the industry in this problem which continues to be an issue and to cause incidents. Plants are asking for operator training to specifically include this topic. The proposed presentation will discuss how heater flooding may occur, potential consequences, best practices to minimize the chances for flooding to occur, and what should be done if it occurs.

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Air Permitting

Upstream Oil & Gas Emissions Inventory Calculations

TBD - TCEQ

Description

Coming soon.

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Air Permitting

Photochemical Modeling for Ozone Inter-Precursor Trading

Qi Zhang - GHD Services

Description

In a typical ozone Nonattainment New Source Review (NNSR) project, one requirement is to offset the project emissions of the ozone precursor (nitrogen oxides [NOx] or volatile organic compounds [VOCs]) with emissions reduction credits (ERCs) obtained from a source within the nonattainment area. As allowed by many state agencies, sometimes permit applicants choose to offset one ozone precursor with another precursor for various reasons, primary due to the ERCs for one precursor being unavailable or too expensive. To support this inter-precursor trading, state agencies and the United States Environmental Protection Agency (US EPA) require a photochemical grid modeling analysis to demonstrate the inter-precursor trading will not adversely affect the area’s attainment demonstration.

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LDAR

Emerging Technologies in Leak Detection and Quantification

Stephen Conley, PhD. - Scientific Aviation

Description

With scientifically-outfitted airplanes, a drone-based quantification and LDAR platform, a mobile laboratory and continuous monitoring devices (in development), Scientific Aviation has become a trusted voice in emissions research and management. Come hear what we’ve learned in our years of global experience, including our in-situ quantification methods and our perspective on emerging technologies in emissions research.

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Chemical

Same Road; Different Trees

Daniel Boreman - Emission Monitoring Service, Inc. (EMSI)

Description

In an environment where so much emphasis is placed on safety, it is easy for workers to lose sight of who is truly responsible for individual safety. Complacency is arguably one of the biggest hazards faced by LDAR monitoring technicians in the field environment. This presentation highlights just how easy it is, even with the best intentions, to become complacent and offers some techniques to get workers re-focused and combat complacency.

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CEMS

Comprehensive CEMS Stack 102: Process Optimization

Dean Kotecki - Envea

Description

Continuous monitoring instruments for bag–house filter performance control, bag leak detectors, flue gas & solid flow moisture monitoring, level detection, reagent injection control, etc. allowing the optimization of your processes: raw material & energy savings, reduction of environmental impacts.

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Health and Safety

A New Way to Measure Toxic Gases in Upstream O&G with Wireless and IIoT

Marcio Donnangelo - Emerson Automation Solutions

Description

Toxic gases remain in the top issues facing the oil and gas industry from a safety perspective. Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) gas, Carbon Monoxide (CO), and Oxygen depletion (O2) are among the most common hazards in the process industries. The gases are extremely toxic and dangerous to personnel who work in these areas. These gases can accumulate in any area where oil or natural gas is processed, stored, or transported. Many cases of people sickened or killed by toxic or harmful fumes are reported throughout the world. Emerson provides a solution to keep end users safe with wireless technology

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Chemical

The Forecast for Your LDAR Program Looks Cloudy, and Why That’s a Good Thing

Christopher Tucker - InspectionLogic Corporation

Description

InspectionLogic has worked hard to move LDAR to a cloud based solution. We have learned a ton along the way and the benefits for everyone involved are huge! Come learn why moving your LDAR program to the cloud is a good thing and how it will benefit you, your facility, and your technicians. Topics will include data security, data accessibility, and what an “always connected” handset really means for LDAR technicians.

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Chemical

Flare Guardian Project

Clayton Francis - Zeeco

Description

Eliminate the inaccuracies and delayed results inherent to indirect flare monitoring. Directly monitors flare performance in real-time rather than determining compliance and combustion efficiency through a time-consuming, repetitive process of measuring inputs, assuming reactions and velocities, and arriving at an assumed operating status.

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Best Management Practices

International Cross-Party Efforts to Improve Valve Reliability

Dave Anderson - Score Valve

Description

Given the important role many automated valves have in reliably containing and manipulating process fluids flow where there are safety, environmental or efficiency implications, it is of critical importance to know that they are fit for purpose and capable of functioning correctly on demand. Furthermore, the control and automation of these operational valves must also have the best possible reliability to ensure zero in-service failures is achieved and maintained. For these reasons, big efforts are being put into developing guidelines, technical reports and recommended practices by a wide range of technical experts worldwide, from the manufacturing, services and operating communities to achieve these goals. This paper will highlight some of the ongoing work of the subject matter experts, technical standards committees and other collaborative working groups around the globe and what implications their work is likely to have on guiding the enhancement of automated valves reliability moving forward. An overview of the work on design for reliability and operational asset management for reliability models will focus delegates’ attention on what controls and practices they currently have in place in their own organizations for valve specification, selection and management and what they may want to additionally implement moving forward, from the latest international publications / thinking. New case studies from major oil and gas operating companies and the technical solutions they have deployed will be examined for effectiveness and compliance with the recommended best practices.

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Emerging Technology

LUMEN Terrain - Continuous Ground-Based Digital Methane Monitoring

Dan Johnson - Baker Hughes GE

Description

Coming soon.

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Emerging Technology

Methane Detection using Satellites

Stephanie Germain - GHGSat

Description

Coming soon.

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Drones

LUMEN Sky - Aerial Drone-Based Digital Methane Monitoring

Dan Johnson - Baker Hughes

Description

Coming soon.

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Legal

Oil & Gas Enforcement Update

Bryan Sinclair - TCEQ

Description

Description coming soon.

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Oil & Gas

Methane Emissions - Whatever you do… do something!

Scott Wallis - Score Valve

Description

Touching on the impact that methane emissions have on companies, acknowledge that they will have some form of strategy in place for managing their emissions on their assets, cover these broadly but highlight improvement opportunities, concluding with an empowering message around best "current" practices.

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Drones

Right of Way Using Drones

Peter Walper - Texas Energy Raters

Description

Coming soon.

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Emerging Technology

Airborne LIDAR Pipeline Inspection Systems

Tim Goolsby - Lasen

Description

Coming soon.

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Oil & Gas

Industry Programs Panel

Matt Todd - The Environmental Partnership, Richard Hyde - ONE Future -

Description

Description coming soon.

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Best Management Practices

Isn’t It Ironic? A Case Study On Dry Seal vs. Wet Seal Centrifugal Compressor Emissions

Brandon Mogan - Montrose

Description

The EPA has been pushing hard for the conversion from wet- to dry-seal centrifugal compressors for decades in an attempt to reduce emissions from the natural gas industry. Ironically, the opposite may have happened. Data from a recent study by Tora Consulting on centrifugal compressors most commonly found in the industry indicates that emissions from dry seal units are orders of magnitude higher than emissions from their wet seal counterparts. This presentation will provide the ultimate example of “missing the forest for the trees”.

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LDAR

Gas Mapping LiDAR (GML) Methane Emission Quantification & Operational Efficiency

Peter Roos - Bridger Photonics

Description

Coming soon.

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Chemical

“4G” Combustion Technology for Flares

Jason Voskuhl & Kurt Kraus - Honeywell UOP Callidus

Description

As flare regulations tighten there has been increased emphasis on monitoring and controlling flaring. While there have been advances in steam control systems and plume monitoring systems there has not been a fundamental change in flare combustion technology for decades. This presentation introduces “4G” combustion technology which changes the paradigm of currently available “3G” flare combustion technology, and sets the bar for the next generation of flare design.

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Best Management Practices

Boiler and Process Heater Tuning as a Best Management Practice

John Bacon - TRC Consulting

Description

While most facilities perceive 40 CFR 63 Subpart DDDDD (Boiler and Heater MACT, or MACT DDDDD) as costly regulation, four years of data compiled from the annually and biennially recurring tune-ups indicates the opposite is true. In fact, regular boiler and process heater tuning for natural gas fired sources can lead to considerable cost savings related to fuel use and a simple payback on the tune-ups services within months. The purpose of this presentation is intended to enlighten the audience on the benefits of boiler and process heater tuning, using data compiled from tune-ups performed on nearly 600 combustion sources, and conducted in accordance with the Boiler MACT work practice standard. Also, how a facility can further benefit from the regular performance of these services beyond the regulatory framework.

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Best Management Practices

Conforming to ASTM-D7036: Self-Declaration vs. Third-Party Accreditation

David Fricker - A2LA

Description

Confidence in test data is paramount to acceptance, and both users and customers want assurance of quality. In general, testing bodies that choose accreditation rather than self-declaration demand a higher quality of work to maintain that accreditation and strive to produce more reliable results. In turn, customers have greater confidence in the accuracy and validity of the data from these testing bodies. Accreditation also provides the industry with confidence that a testing body is subject to regular oversight as a motivator to continually improve their operations. The ongoing verification of compliance ensures that the testing body’s results are consistently dependable and defensible.

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CEMS

Live Demo: Improving Sample Probe, Chiller, and Filter Performance

Donny Klotz - M&C TechGroup North America

Description

Live demonstration to teach the audience about the many ways in which various Continuous Emissions Monitoring System components can be improved, optimized and properly specified for various applications. We'll discuss sample transport and conditioning considerations associated with extractive probe configurations, gas chiller options, filtration materials and temperature controls, and help end-users identify and overcome common CEMS challenges.

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Best Management Practices

Process Burner Flames: The Good, the Bad, and The Ugly

Doug Basquez, Charles Baukal - HollyFrontier Corporation, John Zink Co. LLC

Description

John Zink Hamworthy Combustion field personnel inspect thousands of burners each year. Too often those flames are not only bad but sometimes potentially dangerous. There are a number of conditions needed for good flames. Burners should be operating at or near their design conditions which includes the excess air and draft levels, and the design firing rate (fuel pressure) and fuel composition. The combustion air must be properly distributed, the fuel must be clean, and both the air and fuel must be properly controlled. The burner and its associated equipment (e.g., tile and pilot) must also be properly installed and maintained. There are some visual indicators that should be checked for proper burner operation. These include uniformity (all flames in a given heater should normally look about the same), proper flame color, no leaning between flames or into process tubes, no pronounced hot spots or dark spots on the burner tiles, no irregular flame movement (e.g., no pulsing), and no unusual sounds (e.g., flashback). Bad flames can lead to increased pollution emissions, reduced thermal efficiency, and unplanned shutdowns. Common reasons for bad flames include improper burner maintenance and operation. Dirty fuel is particularly problematic as it can cause fuel injectors to plug which can create multiple problems. Ugly flames can be dangerous and need to be corrected as soon as possible. Examples of these irregular flames include flame impingement, huffing or pulsing, or severely lifted flames. The purpose of this presentation is to discuss proper burner operation and what good flames look like and then to contrast that with lots of examples of improper burner operation including the causes and corrections. This information can be used in the risk-based inspection and performance monitoring processes. Typically, equipment has a function statement (primary/secondary) and performance objectives and ranges. The consequences when the function of the equipment has failed is documented in the earlier processes.

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Chemical

Meeting Flare Emissions Regulations with BTU Measurement

Tom Watson - AMETEK Process Instruments

Description

Learn how mass spectrometer technology can be used to meet emissions requirements by measuring BTU in the flare gas. This session will cover the methods of BTU determination, and will outline the advantages of a mass spectrometer analyzer - speed, accuracy, range, etc. - while discussing application specifics, and total cost of ownership and maintenance needs. There will also be a review of mass spectrometry technology, components, and functions.

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Chemical

Advanced Data Collection Technologies for Rugged Field Work

Craig O'Niell - Juniper Systems

Description

Coming soon.

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Emerging Technology

Advanced Technology for Real Time Fence-Line Perimeter Monitoring.

Gilad Shpitzer - Atmosfir Optics Ltd.

Description

Atmosfir Optics, Ltd., will present the D-fenceline System, an advanced software application, applied to classical FTIR, Open Path Technology, providing significant and unique improvement to remote sensing of fence-line boundaries. We will discuss how these unique algorithms have been applied in the field to drive detection limits down an order of magnitude, pinpoint emission sources with an advanced triangulation algorithm, and increase confidence in using real time data for rapid mitigation and alerts, with instantaneous, real time spectral validation against the NIST reference spectra.

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Chemical

Gilad Shpitzer

- Atmosfir Optics Ltd.

Description

Atmosfir Optics, Ltd, will discuss California’s South Coast’s Air Quality Measurement Division’s Rule 1180 fence-line monitoring requirements, how they came into existence, where they protect public health, and where there are inconsistencies as applied to known risk levels. We will discuss cost effective ways to apply advanced technology that can quickly adapt to potential upcoming requirements from other regulators that may use this rule as a model. Lessons learned from supporting a refinery’s response will be presented.

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Chemical

Optical Flow Sensors for Environmental Compliance and Process Control

Donn Williams - Optical Scientific

Description

OSI's Optical Flow Sensor (OFS) can help you comply with EPA’s Organic Liquids Distribution MACT, RSR and Ja regulations. Unaffected by temperature, pressure, density or gas concentration, OFS makes drift-free flow measurements on flare stacks, thermal oxidizers and a host of similar routine and extreme processes alike with no shutdown needed to install.

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Chemical

Measurement & Speciation Using Mass Spectroscopy Flare Gas Composition

Chuck deCarlo - Extrel Core Mass Spectrometers

Description

As refineries continue to optimize their approach RSR 63.670 compliance, new regulations for flare emissions are set to hit a broad range of industries over the next five years. The goal is to ensure the destruction of Hazardous Air Pollutants (HAPs) prior to release into the atmosphere, but drastic changes in vent gas composition make controlling that efficiency difficult. Getting the full composition of the vent gas quickly allows operations to apply corrections as soon as possible. Flare gas mass spectrometers measure hydrocarbons, carbon oxides, hydrogen, sulfurs, moisture and various volatile organics, and report concentrations and Net Heating Value (NHV) to the control system in seconds. Examples from recent ethylene flare gas regulations and MON sites will be covered in the discussion, along with data from oil refinery flare events.

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Chemical

Opening Up the Opportunities for Performance Verification and Reliability Enhancement of Valves

Dave Anderson - Score Valves

Description

Most fugitive emission reduction / elimination efforts in the industrial community, especially at chemical and refining facilities have been focused on component monitoring with the implementation of LDAR (Leak Detection and Repair) programs. USEPA studies have shown that the vast majority (between 80 and 90%) of fugitive emissions are associated with valve and connector leaks . While necessary, LDAR programs are, by definition, concerned with fixing leaks when they are encountered, not preventing them. Further, it could be argued that the greatest contribution to lowering fugitive emission rates from connectors and valves is through the use of consistent time-tested assembly and maintenance procedures, and the selection of the best available technology in terms of lowest emission valve packings, gaskets, torqueing equipment, and other equipment. An overview of best practices for achieving lowest fugitive emission rates for bolted flange connectors and valves including a fugitive emissions model for gasketed connectors will be presented.

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LDAR

The Path to Equivalency

Kristine Bennett - CSU METEC

Description

The Evaluation of Innovative Methane Detection Technologies summarizes the technical-regulatory guidance document of the same title published by the Interstate Technology & Regulatory Council (ITRC) in September 2018 (https://methane-1.itrcweb.org/). Over the last number of years, several state, national and international governments have passed or are considering methane emission regulations related to oil and natural gas production and distribution. Historically, gas detection technologies used to regulate fugitive emissions in the oil and gas sector had to comply with EPA’s Method 21 requirements. With the advent of optical gas imaging (OGI) technologies, EPA established an alternative work practice (AWP) to allow inclusion of manually operated infrared cameras for leak detection. EPA's amendments to the New Source Performance Standards (NSPS) on methane and volatile organic compounds (VOC) for oil and gas sources include Method 21 and OGI technologies as approved compliance methods, as well as the option for approving new leak detection technologies. Colorado and Pennsylvania allow similar options in their regulation of methane and VOC from oil and gas operations. In response, innovators are currently developing new technologies that go beyond Method 21 and OGI. However, there is no standard methodology or protocol to evaluate performance of new technologies like these as compared to Method 21 or OGI. The ITRC guidance document seeks to provide a framework for evaluating methane and VOC detection technologies for use in meeting existing and forthcoming leak regulations, assisting with inventory monitoring and reporting, and for enhancing safety. The document also identifies regulatory barriers and opportunities for new or innovative leak detection technologies. The guidance document does not purport to provide "the answer" on how to evaluate leak detection technologies, particularly in regard to determining equivalency of new technologies or methods with existing, approved technologies or methods. However, the document does provide a starting point in this ongoing challenge and discussion, which continues beyond the publication of the document and will be refined further over time, including through efforts such as the Path to Equivalency project being lead by the Methane Emissions Technology Evaluation Center (METEC) at Colorado State University, and the Canadian Environmental Protection Agency's Leak Detection Technology Equivalency framework currently under development.

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Chemical

Reduce Turnaround Duration By Eliminating Flare/Flare Gas Recover Using New Scrubber Technology

Jim Woodard - Vapor Point LLC

Description

The refining industry is challenged with the development of alternative technologies to control hazardous and regulated emissions such as Hydrogen Sulfide and Total VOC compounds.  FederalAgencies, through rule promulgation and Consent Decree, have emphasized a highlighted effort to minimize flare usage as a control device.  The current rule promulgation of NSPS subpart Ja, RefineryMACT, and the Refinery Technology Rule each will provide challenges to perform de-inventory and decontamination phases of turnarounds in a timely manner.  The direct impact of regulatory action is on the shoulders of those responsible for the planning, execution, and management of turnaround activities.  Vapor Point will present case histories on projects at multiple refineries and multiple process units requiring various control requirements.  Presentation will demonstrate very common challenges that refiners face under the new EPA regulations and solutions that have been successfully deployed in the field with the new scrubber technology package.

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Emerging Technology

Field Study Use Cases of FLIR and TDLAS Enabled Drones for Methane and VOC Leak Detection

Roy Massengale - EnRud

Description

Description coming soon.

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Emerging Technology

Autonomous Mobile Methane Monitoring

Brendan Smith - SeekOps

Description

Current emissions monitoring techniques and technologies are unable to meet growing demands for FME inspections in a cost-effective or efficient manner. SeekOps enables responsible energy production through rapid, efficient, and cost-effective FME monitoring.

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Best Management Practices

5 Reasons to Digitize your Oil & Gas Crews

Luke Carton - Parsable

Description

Giving O&G crews the digital tools to raise their performance is an overlooked opportunity of potentially immense proportions. You can generate incremental ROI with every job you digitize. Multiply that by all the complex nested jobs within your operations — and stretching across O&G value chains.

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LDAR

Handheld TDLAS for Quick, Safe Methane Leak Detection in Difficult to reach Areas

Jacob Melby - Sensit Technologies

Description

Description coming soon.

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Drones

Quadcopter Drones, Fixed Wing Drone, Helicopters, or Fixed Wing Plane?

David Furry - Leak Surveys Inc.

Description

Coming soon.

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Emerging Technology

MethaneSAT 2021 Satellite Methane Detection Coming Soon

Tom Ingersol - Environmental Defense Fund

Description

Coming soon.

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Emerging Technology

Satellite-based Hyperspectral Analysis for Emissions Detection, Integrity Monitoring and Compliance

Peter Weaver & Tushar Prabhakar - Orbital Sidekick

Description

Analysis of hyperspectral imagery (HSI), collected by micro-satellite, is poised to provide unparalleled global daily leak and emissions detection capability for the chemical, oil and gas industries. Space-based HSI offers an ability to directly find leaks, detect threatening construction activity, identify physical changes to soil and vegetation caused by leaked product, and even distinguish between specific hydrocarbon liquids or vapors. In this presentation, OSK will discuss the state-of-the-art for using HSI to detect fugitive emissions. It will provide examples of inspection findings using Spectral IntelligenceTM. And, it will provide insight on how HSI can improve the operator’s ability to cost-effectively understand the conditions at and around their assets.

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Chemical

Digital Camera Visible Emissions Method (Alternative Method 082) in lieu of Method 9 for Visible Emissions

Shawn Dolan - Virtual Technology, LLC

Description

ASTM D7520-16 and US EPA Alternative Method 082, have revolutionized Visible Emission Management practices over the last 7 years. Community Air Quality Awareness has become a litigation boiling pot, as smart phones, and low cost Particulate and Ozone monitors, have flooded the monitoring markets, making monitoring readily available to everybody everywhere. The exponential growth of the community monitoring market over the last two years will be reviewed and strategies to embrace community monitoring as a means of compliance assurance will be discussed in this presentation.

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LDAR

Laser Dispersion Spectroscopy – Large Area Fugitive Monitoring

Mohammed Belal - Mirico

Description

Coming soon.

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Chemical

Safety's Competitive Advantage and the Future of the Safety, Health, and Environmental Profession - Colin Brown - Board of Certified Safety Professionals

Colin Brown - Board of Certified Safety Professionals

Description

Compliance with state and federal regulations is the absolute minimum and does not ensure the safety and health of workers. Safety and health in today's dynamic industry space must no longer be defined as the absence of harm and death. How do you turn safety into a competitive advantage, and what does the future hold for the profession entrusted with employee and customer well-being? This presentation highlights how professional development through accredited certification can change organizational culture and drive results through SH&E leadership. Learning Objectives Upon completion, the participant will be able to: Describe why compliance is not enough to reduce injuries and loss in construction. Recognize at least three ways that safety makes a company competitive. Leverage training and certification to drive higher levels of safety and productivity. Show how H&S is important not only for workers but also for front-line supervisors and executives.

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Best Management Practices

ICI FLIR and TDLAS Enabled Drone Basics of Capabilities and Functionality

Gary Strahan - Gary Strahan

Description

Description coming soon.

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Chemical

Flare Instrumentation – Minimum “Expectations”

Derek Stuck - Spectrum Environmental Solutions, LLC

Description

As the U.S. EPA begins expanding the flare requirements first found in the Refinery Sector Rule to other industries, newly affected facilities need to begin planning the installation of new monitoring on covered flares. This potentially includes pilot monitoring, visible emissions monitoring, vent gas flow monitoring, assist gas flow monitoring, and net heating value and/or composition monitoring; all of which will be required to meet the new requirements. This presentation will summarize the monitoring required by the new flare requirements and describe some of the technologies which may be used to comply with the regulations’ requirements.

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Best Management Practices

I got 99 problems… now what? Best Practices for Addressing Audit Findings

Courtney Edge - Trinity Consultants

Description

Conducting a gap assessment or audit is a great starting point for getting your LDAR program into compliance – but that’s only the first of many steps. After findings, observations, and recommendations are identified, corrective actions must be developed and prioritized appropriately. Depending on the scope and number of identified issues, this can be a daunting task but there are ways to manage the stress and work load accordingly. This presentation will cover what to do after the completion of an audit or gap assessment of your LDAR program.

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Best Management Practices

Utilizing Vapor Lock Technology for Tank Degassing and Tank Vent Management versus Thermal Destruction or Activated Carbon

Jim Woodard, Jeff St. Amant - Vapor Point, LLC

Description

State and Local Agency actions have added emphasis to the management of emissions from large API 650 storage tanks, as a result of regulatory action and/or public engagement. In the US most API 650 storage tanks, which are in a service where there is a potential for VOC emissions, have been outfitted with internal floating roofs, which are considered by the EPA as BACT. Historically, tank owners have had requirements for controlling emissions from tanks when existing tank attachments have malfunctioned, or when the tank is being prepared for maintenance activities. Thermal destruction devices are the most commonly used control technologies for managing tank emissions, but they may not be the most efficient or effective. This presentation will review the development of a new Vapor Lock technology for the management of tank emissions during degassing and cleaning operations, demonstrating improved operational performance, while reducing cost impacts to clients.

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Best Management Practices

New Technology for the Removal of Sulfur Compounds from Hydrocarbon Products, Helping Combat Economic Strains Caused by Tier II and III Sulfur Credits

Jeff St. Amant - Vapor Point, LLC

Description

While technology focus in our industry has been centered on automation and monitoring capabilities, little new science has developed in meeting the challenges that high sulfur oil and gas production has brought with it. Vapor Point and its partnership with Baker Hughes has developed new mobile technologies focused on helping clients mitigate quality issues with hydrocarbon feedstocks and products. In addition to this new mobile deployment, Vapor Point has created new chemistries capable of extracting sulfur species such as butyl mercaptan, which cannot be managed with amines or other specialty chemical technologies. This presentation will discuss existing applications where Vapor Point has assisted clients with improving the quality of both feedstocks and saleable fuels by removing unwanted sulfur contamination such as Hydrogen Sulfide, Methyl Mercaptan, Ethyl Mercaptan, Propyl Mercaptan and Butyl Mercaptan.

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