Environmental Compliance Presentations for Refining, Chemical, Oil & Gas
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February 20th

Enhanced LDAR Training: An Unconventional Approach to Training LDAR Technicians

Todd Morrison - Insight Environmental

Description

Is your LDAR training up to date with modern technology? This presentation will detail the process of incorporating technology such as 3D modeling and virtual and augmented reality into your LDAR training.

Date

Thursday, February 20, 2020

Time

4:30PM

Location

Room 400

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February 20th

Back from the Future

Don Kinder - MarkWest, Jake Fournier - Marathon, and Deever Bradley - ERM -

Description

MarkWest migrated away from the AWP for LDAR compliance monitoring. We left where everyone is trying to go and reverted back to M21 monitoring for our LDAR programs. Will have some stats and such to show the difference in leak % with OGI vs M21.

Date

Thursday, February 20, 2020

Time

11:00AM

Location

Room 602

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February 20th

LDAR Case Study Comparison of Conventional Method 21 vs Alternative Work Practice

Terence Trefiak - Montrose Air Quality

Description

I am the Managing Director of Target Emission Services. We provide fugitive emission surveys for the natural gas industry (transmission, processing, storage and LNG). We specialize in using Optical Gas Imaging (OGI) to detect hydrocarbon leaks and vents for regulatory compliance (EPA Subpart W - Green House Gas). However, we have started to utilize OGI to meet our natural gas processing clients various LDAR requirements (EPA OOOO and KKK) by following the Method 21 Alternative Work Practice (AWP) which allows for the use of optical infrared hydrocarbon detection. This AWP was released to provide industry with an option to use Optical Gas Imaging to replace “conventional” TVA type LDAR equipment for Method 21 facility inspections. OGI uses a specialized filtered infrared camera to provide a real time video of hydrocarbon gas leaks that are invisible to the human eye. The camera can survey up to 1000-1500 components per hour (compared to only 50 components/hour with conventional equipment), surpassing both the efficiency and effectiveness of traditional hand held gas analyzers. In addition many components that are classified as difficult to monitor using conventional hand held equipment can be readily scanned at a distance with the camera. A video of each emission source can also be recorded to provide the exact location of the leak and helps to ensure that the correct repair actions are being made. The use of OGI is on average 10 – 20 times more efficient that conventional LDAR equipment presenting a significant cost savings.The main questions are, • Is the AWP approach as actually as effective as the conventional LDAR approach? • Why are most LDAR contractors not using the AWP approach?• What are the tangible benefits (cost, # and size of leaks detected, safety, etc.) of OGI vs Conventional?My presentation will attempt to answer these questions using actual case study data from 2 large gas processing facilities. The presentation will compare survey results from both OGI and conventional monitoring and show specific examples (survey cost/durations, leak videos, etc.)

Date

Thursday, February 20, 2020

Time

10:30AM

Location

Room 602

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Chemical

Turnaround LDAR Best Management Practices

Jeff Diehl - Think Environmental

Description

Description coming soon.

Date

Thursday, February 20, 2020

Time

11:30AM

Location

Room 400

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Chemical

Alternative Work Practice: How Revisions May Affect Refineries

Karen Marsh - US EPA

Description

On December 22, 2008, EPA published a voluntary alternative work practice for LDAR using optical gas imaging. Since promulgation, advancements have been made in leak detection technologies that warrant examination of revisions to the alternative work practice. EPA plans to propose revisions to the alternative work practice in 2020 which may impact how refineries would implement the alternative. This presentation will discuss key questions, related to refineries, that EPA is considering during development of this proposal.

Date

Thursday, February 20, 2020

Time

12:00PM

Location

Room 400

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Emerging Technology

Applications and Field Results for Quantitative Optical Gas Imaging

Jon Morris - Providence Photonics

Description

Optical Gas Imaging (OGI) is gaining traction as the best available Leak Detection and Repair technology(LDAR) for the detection of fugitive emissions. The NSPS OOOOa regulations, for the first time, have allowed for OGI as the primary LDAR technology. In addition, the emerging field of Quantitative Optical Gas imaging (QOGI) has opened up new applications and new possibilities for OGI. A recent QOGI method which allows operators to determine emission rates using a handheld optical gas imager. The technology has been tested and validated through various field studies and independent testing.This presentation will discuss applications and field testing results for QOGI in the upstream oil and gas industry. QOGI results are compared to known release rates and other quantitative methods. Applications for QOGI in both upstream and downstream oil and gas and petrochemical industries. Comparisons are made between available quantification technologies in the context of Leak Detection and Repair.

Date

Friday, February 21, 2020

Time

9:00AM

Location

Room 616B

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Chemical

Leveraging Digital Twin technology to reduce inspection-related defects and optimize your LDAR program

Boun Sananikone, David Tullos - Bureau Veritas

Description

LDAR programs are based upon accurate inspections, timely repair, and proper identification of required components which need to monitored. Without the aforementioned, components working in parallel, your program maybe missing critical inspection points. Learn how Bureau Veritas is improving internal quality and helping our clients develop world-class fugitive emissions programs through our methodology.

Date

Thursday, February 20, 2020

Time

2:30PM

Location

Room 400

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Chemical

The Forecast for Your LDAR Program Looks Cloudy, and Why That’s a Good Thing

Christopher Tucker - InspectionLogic Corporation

Description

InspectionLogic has worked hard to move LDAR to a cloud based solution. We have learned a ton along the way and the benefits for everyone involved are huge! Come learn why moving your LDAR program to the cloud is a good thing and how it will benefit you, your facility, and your technicians. Topics will include data security, data accessibility, and what an “always connected” handset really means for LDAR technicians.

Date

Thursday, February 20, 2020

Time

1:30PM

Location

Room 400

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February 21st

Holistic Asset Management Using Methane Data & Analytics

Aaron Van Pelt - Picarro

Description

Advances in mobile methane detection technology and analytics allow natural gas emissions data to be collected at a speed and scale not previously possible. Concurrent advances in “Big Data” Analytics allow better-informed conclusions to be drawn from that data and action taken. Such data-driven decisions are showing substantial financial benefits in pipe replacement, risk reduction, leak survey and emissions reduction. Methane data can be collected across a natural gas network and then used for multiple applications – an example being annual patrols to find and repair the highest-emitting leaks wherein secondary uses of the same data might be for improved prioritization of pipeline replacement projects and for risk-based leak survey. This revolution in the rapid, wide-scale collection and use of methane data is driving gas operators to use it in all aspects of how they manage their assets.

Date

Friday, February 21, 2020

Time

9:30AM

Location

Room 616B

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February 21st

Advances in Airborne Gas Leak Detection

Peter Roos - Bridger Photonics

Description

This presentation will describe, in simple terms, the three types of airborne gas leak detection solutions. The presentation will then highlight how recent technology advances are reducing operational leak monitoring costs by 60% to 90%. The presentation will answer the questions “What is Gas Mapping LiDAR”.

Date

Friday, February 21, 2020

Time

11:30AM

Location

Room 616B

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February 20th

A New Way to Measure Toxic Gases with Wireless and IIoT

Josh Hernandez - Emerson Automation Solutions

Description

Toxic gases remain in the top issues facing the oil and gas industry from a safety perspective. Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) gas, Carbon Monoxide (CO), and Oxygen depletion (O2) are among the most common hazards in the process industries. The gases are extremely toxic and dangerous to personnel who work in these areas. These gases can accumulate in any area where oil or natural gas is processed, stored, or transported. Many cases of people sickened or killed by toxic or harmful fumes are reported throughout the world. Emerson provides a solution to keep end users safe with wireless technology

Date

Thursday, February 20, 2020

Time

2:30PM

Location

Room 417B

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Chemical

Advantages of Hot-Filter Cooled OGI technology for Leak Detection and Quantification

Ram Hashmonay - Opgal

Description

The ability to manually replace or automatically swap filters in an OGI camera provide many advantages for various OGI applications. This presentation reviews several OGI applications, where swapping the filter provides better detection sensitivity, longer range, compounds' classification, and more accurate quantification.

Date

Thursday, February 20, 2020

Time

11:00AM

Location

Room 400

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Chemical

The Transformation of LDAR: Predictive Leak Management Software

Brian Whitley - Emission Monitoring Service, Inc. (EMSI)

Description

Description coming soon.

Date

Thursday, February 20, 2020

Time

2:00PM

Location

Room 400

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February 20th

ZEVAC® - Reducing gas released during routine operations & maintenance

Brad Sando - TPE Midstream

Description

Intentional release of natural gas during routine operations and maintenance has been identified by the US House Pipeline Safety Bill as an area to implement best-available technology for capturing released gas. Make ZEVAC® your BAT/BACT for reducing or eliminating release activity, as it was designed specifically to handle high frequency, low volume events keeping the gas safely in the piping system. Look to ZEVAC® to reduce or eliminate emissions throughout the value chain, whether you’re upstream, gathering, transmission, storage or distribution. For NGL operators, ZEVAC® Q is an industry first compressor technology capable of handling both liquid and vapor phase. Q is a safe alternative to thermal controls and flaring.

Date

Thursday, February 20, 2020

Time

10:30AM

Location

Room 617

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Best Management Practices

Barr will demonstrate its free Microsoft Excel spreadsheet tools for storage tank emissions, LDAR program review and compliance reporting, and MACT CC flare NHVcz standards

Corey Mead - Barr Engineering

Description

Description coming soon

Date

Thursday, February 20, 2020

Time

11:30AM

Location

Room 417A

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February 21st

Emerging Technologies in Leak Detection and Quantification

Stephen Conley, PhD. - Scientific Aviation

Description

With scientifically-outfitted airplanes, a drone-based quantification and LDAR platform, a mobile laboratory and continuous monitoring devices (in development), Scientific Aviation has become a trusted voice in emissions research and management. Come hear what we’ve learned in our years of global experience, including our in-situ quantification methods and our perspective on emerging technologies in emissions research.

Date

Friday, February 21, 2020

Time

1:30PM

Location

Room 616B

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Best Management Practices

Integrating Speciation Data For Chemical Plants and Refineries

John Beath - JBE

Description

A surprising number of reports rely on chemical speciation data for purchased chemicals, feedstocks, intermediate streams and products. Recent experience with an EPA NEIC inspection underscored the value in centralizing this data for consistency. Calculations related to quantities present onsite (Tier Two), release reporting and threshold determinations (EPCRA/SARA), emissions calculations (EI/TRI), TSCA Manufacturing Inventory (coming in 2020), RMP (Maximum Intended Inventory), PSM (operator process information), OSHA Hazard Communication, and permit applications could benefit from a carefully orchestrated process. Imagine if the system you develop internally could answer simple questions for emergency situations like what’s the composition of the material in that drum, or that heat exchanger; and imagine if a process was in place to keep all of the content revised as process changes occur.

Date

Thursday, February 20, 2020

Time

11:00AM

Location

Room 417A

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Best Management Practices

Methane Emissions - Adopting a find it, fix it mentality!

Scott Wallis - Score Valves

Description

When companies detect a fugitive emission on their asset, it usually gets added to a leak register for repair at the next convenient opportunity. Because so many "weeps" can exist at any one time, if the repair program is not efficient and weeps are not repaired in a timely manner, this not only costs the asset money and affects performance, it becomes a serious safety and environmental issue. If just one leak was to escalate and shut the plant down, this has a huge financial cost and knock on impact. The message - It can be avoided if we find and repair our weeps regularly.

Date

Friday, February 21, 2020

Time

10:30AM

Location

Room 617

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Best Management Practices

Realtime PRV Leak Detection and Process Data Analysis for Environmental, Occupational and Process Safety Management

Marcelo Dultra & Marcio Donnangelo - Emerson Automation Solutions

Description

20% of PRVs in a typical operation are potentially leaking. Undetected and therefore not reported PRV releases occur more often than operators realize and are one of the major causes to compromise valve sealing integrity. PRVs are the last line of defense against process overpressure and it is critical that all releases be reported and recorded for process safety root cause analysis, including near miss safety events. Join this session with Anderson Greenwood Crosby PRV team to discuss wireless monitoring solutions that enable operators to correlate real time PRV information with process data and maintenance records to improve environmental, occupational and process safety management.

Date

Thursday, February 20, 2020

Time

3:00PM

Location

Room 406

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Best Management Practices

International Cross-Party Efforts to Improve Valve Reliability

Dave Anderson - Score Valve

Description

Given the important role many automated valves have in reliably containing and manipulating process fluids flow where there are safety, environmental or efficiency implications, it is of critical importance to know that they are fit for purpose and capable of functioning correctly on demand. Furthermore, the control and automation of these operational valves must also have the best possible reliability to ensure zero in-service failures is achieved and maintained. For these reasons, big efforts are being put into developing guidelines, technical reports and recommended practices by a wide range of technical experts worldwide, from the manufacturing, services and operating communities to achieve these goals. This paper will highlight some of the ongoing work of the subject matter experts, technical standards committees and other collaborative working groups around the globe and what implications their work is likely to have on guiding the enhancement of automated valves reliability moving forward. An overview of the work on design for reliability and operational asset management for reliability models will focus delegates’ attention on what controls and practices they currently have in place in their own organizations for valve specification, selection and management and what they may want to additionally implement moving forward, from the latest international publications / thinking. New case studies from major oil and gas operating companies and the technical solutions they have deployed will be examined for effectiveness and compliance with the recommended best practices.

Date

Thursday, February 20, 2020

Time

10:30AM

Location

Room 616A

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EHS Technology for O&G/Petrochemicals

Lightweight, Modular OOOOa Certified OGI Camera Core for Handheld, UAV, or Fixed Mount CMS

Jeff Leake - Sierra Olympic Technologies, Inc.

Description

The Ventus (OGI) camera core features a 640 x 512, 15-micron pixel-pitch, "Hot" midwave-infrared (MWIR) detector array providing unmatched thermal sensitivity and weighs only 580 grams (1.28 lbs.), with lens. Designed to optimize the detection and visualization of hydrocarbon gas leaks, such as methane, propane, butane, and 20 others. The “Hot-MWIR” Ventus OGI is a lightweight, low-power, camera core that can be integrated into gimbals/enclosures for manned or unmanned aerial system platforms or for fixed mounted continuous monitoring systems. Sierra-Olympic’s compact (146.6 mm x 70.9 mm x 73.1 mm/5.77 in x 2.70 in. x 2.88 in.) OGI camera features a special narrow bandpass cold filter in a miniature, long-life, closed-cycle Stirling cooler with an f/1.5 cold shield and an optimized, light weight, f/1.5, 25mm lens. State-of-the-art components including the detector, cooler, and lens design, combine with a selection of digital and analog inputs/outputs (Camera Link, H.264 IP Video, NTSC/PAL video plus RS-232/RS-422 serial camera control) to make this camera core an ideal optical gas imaging solution for integrators, OEMs and end users. Additional features include: a 32GB SD storage card, Contrast Limited Adaptive Histogram Equalization (CLAHE), Local Area Processing (LAP), Automatic Gain Control (AGC), Sharpening, DeNoise, Gas Enhancement Mode (GEM) and Electronic Image Stabilization (EIS). Optional items will include Target Tracking, Telemetry, NMEA and GPS i/o.

Date

Friday, February 21, 2020

Time

1:00PM

Location

Room 616B

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February 21st

Passive Ultrasonic Imaging: a novel LDAR tool for gas leak detection and quantification

Florian Perrodin - Distran Ltd

Description

Ultrasound as a leak detection method in Oil & Gas has been used with little success in the past due to its time consuming nature, and the heavy training requirements. Instead of using a single microphone, novel devices such as Distran Ultra Pro have a microphone array that produces acoustic pictures instead of playing sound like previous devices. Overlaid with an optical image in real-time, the user is able to instantly pinpoints the leaks in a radius of 30 feet. The technique allows additionally to quantify leakages rate in real-time. Advantages and limits of the technique will be presented.

Date

Friday, February 21, 2020

Time

2:00PM

Location

Room 616A

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Chemical

Opening Up the Opportunities for Performance Verification and Reliability Enhancement of Valves

Dave Anderson - Score Valves

Description

Most fugitive emission reduction / elimination efforts in the industrial community, especially at chemical and refining facilities have been focused on component monitoring with the implementation of LDAR (Leak Detection and Repair) programs. USEPA studies have shown that the vast majority (between 80 and 90%) of fugitive emissions are associated with valve and connector leaks . While necessary, LDAR programs are, by definition, concerned with fixing leaks when they are encountered, not preventing them. Further, it could be argued that the greatest contribution to lowering fugitive emission rates from connectors and valves is through the use of consistent time-tested assembly and maintenance procedures, and the selection of the best available technology in terms of lowest emission valve packings, gaskets, torqueing equipment, and other equipment. An overview of best practices for achieving lowest fugitive emission rates for bolted flange connectors and valves including a fugitive emissions model for gasketed connectors will be presented.

Date

Thursday, February 20, 2020

Time

3:30PM

Location

Room 400

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February 20th

The Path to Equivalency

Kristine Bennett - CSU METEC

Description

The Evaluation of Innovative Methane Detection Technologies summarizes the technical-regulatory guidance document of the same title published by the Interstate Technology & Regulatory Council (ITRC) in September 2018 (https://methane-1.itrcweb.org/). Over the last number of years, several state, national and international governments have passed or are considering methane emission regulations related to oil and natural gas production and distribution. Historically, gas detection technologies used to regulate fugitive emissions in the oil and gas sector had to comply with EPA’s Method 21 requirements. With the advent of optical gas imaging (OGI) technologies, EPA established an alternative work practice (AWP) to allow inclusion of manually operated infrared cameras for leak detection. EPA's amendments to the New Source Performance Standards (NSPS) on methane and volatile organic compounds (VOC) for oil and gas sources include Method 21 and OGI technologies as approved compliance methods, as well as the option for approving new leak detection technologies. Colorado and Pennsylvania allow similar options in their regulation of methane and VOC from oil and gas operations. In response, innovators are currently developing new technologies that go beyond Method 21 and OGI. However, there is no standard methodology or protocol to evaluate performance of new technologies like these as compared to Method 21 or OGI. The ITRC guidance document seeks to provide a framework for evaluating methane and VOC detection technologies for use in meeting existing and forthcoming leak regulations, assisting with inventory monitoring and reporting, and for enhancing safety. The document also identifies regulatory barriers and opportunities for new or innovative leak detection technologies. The guidance document does not purport to provide "the answer" on how to evaluate leak detection technologies, particularly in regard to determining equivalency of new technologies or methods with existing, approved technologies or methods. However, the document does provide a starting point in this ongoing challenge and discussion, which continues beyond the publication of the document and will be refined further over time, including through efforts such as the Path to Equivalency project being lead by the Methane Emissions Technology Evaluation Center (METEC) at Colorado State University, and the Canadian Environmental Protection Agency's Leak Detection Technology Equivalency framework currently under development.

Date

Thursday, February 20, 2020

Time

10:00AM

Location

Room 602

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February 20th

Large Area Fugitive Emission Monitoring in All Conditions - Laser Dispersion Spectroscopy

Dr. Sophie Purser - MIRICO

Description

MIRICO’s technology is designed to continuously and autonomously measure total facility methane emission rates, as well as detect, localise and quantify fugitive emissions. We will present data exemplifying the use of the technology in adverse weather conditions with no reduction in performance. It is the use of the novel laser dispersion spectroscopy technique which allows the instrument to output such accurate, precise and reliable measurements, even in rain, snow, or fog.

Date

Thursday, February 20, 2020

Time

4:00PM

Location

Room 417B

Register Now →

February 20th

The Evolution of Optical Gas Imaging

Craig O’Neill & Rob Raymer - FLIR Systems

Description

From its inception nearly 15 years ago, Optical Gas Imaging (OGI) has steadily evolved from being classified as a little-known emerging technology to now being a well-understood and accepted fugitive emission solution. OGI has advanced beyond the classification of “alternative” regulatory technology to being widely accepted and regarded as one of the most cost-effective approaches for leak detection. OGI is even listed as a Best System for Emissions Reduction (BSER) in the 2016 NSPS OOOOa regulation. True cost-effectiveness has been shown in OGI’s ability to safely inspect difficult to monitor components, which have historically added to inspection man-hours and equipment expense, such as those required to build scaffolding or use personnel lift equipment. OGI has also been shown to reduce costs by allowing more components to be inspected in a shorter amount of time, effectively helping to find the larger (long-tail) leaks faster. Once known only as a qualitative leak detection technique, OGI can now quantify leaks via Quantitative Optical Gas Imaging (qOGI) analysis which further simplifies the visualization and measurement of gas emissions. Newer, lower-cost OGI detectors now allow for cost-effective continuous, autonomous leak detection complete with alarming and recording capabilities. Other advancements in OGI detectors have reduced power requirements which allow them to be used in UAV payloads where miles of pipe or other difficult to monitor components and equipment can be quickly and safely inspected. This paper will give more detail and insight into the progression and evolution of this exciting technology.

Date

Thursday, February 20, 2020

Time

10:30AM

Location

Room 400

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February 20th

A New Era of LDAR in Texas: Industries Can Now Use OGI in Lieu of Method 21 to Meet “28” Series LDAR Requirements

Brandon Morgan - Tora Consulting

Description

Last year, Tora Consulting, LLC (Tora) obtained the first ever approval in Texas for the use of optical gas imaging (OGI) technology as an alternative to the Method 21 monitoring requirements of TCEQ’s “28” series boilerplate leak detection and repair (LDAR) programs (e.g., 28MID, 28VHP, etc.). The approval was a milestone, paving the way for others in Texas to implement a more efficient, effective, and economical OGI-based LDAR program. The presentation will discuss Tora’s approach for negotiating the approval, summarize the OGI-based LDAR program, and provide an overview of important permitting considerations for those interested in making the change.

Date

Thursday, February 20, 2020

Time

4:00PM

Location

Room 400

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February 21st

Green Gas & Emissions Intensity

Roy Hartstein - RES Solutions

Date

Friday, February 21, 2020

Time

9:00AM

Location

Room 616A

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February 21st

Large Area Fugitive Emission Monitoring in All Conditions - Laser Dispersion Spectroscopy

Dr. Sophie Purser - Mirico

Description

MIRICO’s technology is designed to continuously and autonomously measure total facility methane emission rates, as well as detect, localise and quantify fugitive emissions. We will present data exemplifying the use of the technology in adverse weather conditions with no reduction in performance. It is the use of the novel laser dispersion spectroscopy technique which allows the instrument to output such accurate, precise and reliable measurements, even in rain, snow, or fog.

Date

Friday, February 21, 2020

Time

11:00AM

Location

Room 616B

Register Now →

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