Environmental Compliance Presentations for Refining, Chemical, Oil & Gas
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Chemical

Eliminating H2S & SO2 Emissions at SRU, Coker and Other Sulfur Handling Units of Refineries

Jim Woodard, Sean Kirkpatrick - Vapor Point, LLC

Description

The Federal Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and state enforcement agencies have placed greater attention on the use of flares, and have in recent years placed new stringent regulations in place to directly impact flare operations (NSPS Subpart Ja), but are also imposing new National Ambient Emissions Standards Vapor Point applies high efficiency liquid scrubbing systems to eliminate Hydrogen Sulfide (H2S), Sulphur Dioxide (SO2) other Sulfur Species as well as other Hazardous Air Pollutants (HAPs) and Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs). Specially designed temporary vessels for liquid and vapor phase product management have also been developed and are key elements in some applications. These control system concepts and resulting proven processes were developed with input from refining personnel who needed alternative technologies that would offer operational flexibility eliminating the various sulfur contaminates. The vapor phase emission control systems and specially designed process vessels have met the needs of the refining industry with numerous field implementations. This paper/presentation will be focused on how the deployment of mobile technologies eliminates H2S & SO2 emissions resulting in improved worker safety while eliminating concerns with Ja regulations.

Date

Thursday, February 20, 2020

Time

11:00AM

Location

Room 406

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February 20th

Back from the Future

Don Kinder - MarkWest, Jake Fournier - Marathon, and Deever Bradley - ERM -

Description

MarkWest migrated away from the AWP for LDAR compliance monitoring. We left where everyone is trying to go and reverted back to M21 monitoring for our LDAR programs. Will have some stats and such to show the difference in leak % with OGI vs M21.

Date

Thursday, February 20, 2020

Time

11:00AM

Location

Room 602

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February 20th

“4G” Combustion Technology for Flares

Jason Voskuhl & Kurt Kraus - Honeywell UOP Callidus

Description

As flare regulations tighten there has been increased emphasis on monitoring and controlling flaring. While there have been advances in steam control systems and plume monitoring systems there has not been a fundamental change in flare combustion technology for decades. This presentation introduces “4G” combustion technology which changes the paradigm of currently available “3G” flare combustion technology, and sets the bar for the next generation of flare design.

Date

Thursday, February 20, 2020

Time

12:00PM

Location

Room 406

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Chemical

Ultra-Low Steam Consumption, High Capacity Smokeless Flare

Clayton Francis - Zeeco

Description

This paper will introduce the technology behind, test data for, and industry challenges addressed by a new Ultra-Low Steam Consumption, High Capacity Smokeless Flare design developed by Zeeco, Inc. This flare technology is designed to further improve flaring efficiency and reduce steam consumption while continuing to meet the EPA Code of Federal Regulations, Chapter 1, Subchapter C, Part 63, Subpart CC requirements. We will focus on how the design addresses known industry challenges in high capacity, low steam consumption flaring, such as needing the ability to operate at low flare gas pressure since many applications have a maximum flare gas pressure at the flare tip of 3 psig. The paper will detail how this new design can achieve as low as 0.17 lbs. steam / lbs. flare gas at 20% of maximum flow rate, with the maximum flow rate achieved at a flare gas pressure of 3 psig. The above data is based upon a 5 mph wind with less than Ringlemann 1 opacity and a flare gas that is 100% propylene. For smokeless operation with propylene, other current steam assisted flare designs require approximately 0.5 lbs. steam / lbs. flare gas and / or a much higher flare gas pressure at maximum flaring capacity. Ultra-Low Consumption Steam Assisted Flaring is very important since any reduction in the required steam flow rate saves not only money, but also reduces the emissions produced from the production of the required higher steam flows. A key feature of this technology is that the air and steam mixture leave the flare at the same elevation as the flare tip exit, meaning no pre-mixing of air into the flare stream. Other current industry designs mix the air and steam with the flare gas prior to exiting the flare tip, negatively impacting the NHVcz according to the new calculation parameters required by MACT CC. Zeeco’s design more efficiently mixes the steam and air together and then mixes the resulting stream with the flare gas, creating a final mixture with a significantly increased volume of air. When the resulting mixture interacts with the flare gas at the tip exit, the increased air volume is readily available for combustion, meaning the flare is less likely to smoke. Since the design more efficiently mixes the air and steam together, less steam is required to achieve smokeless operation. Furthermore, the inherent efficiency of the mixing delivers a design less dependent upon using flare gas pressure to achieve smokeless operation. The flare can successfully operate at lower gas pressures at maximum flow rate.

Date

Thursday, February 20, 2020

Time

2:00PM

Location

Room 406

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Chemical

Flare System Control and Optimization at Refineries and Chemical Plants

Lei Sui - Baker Hughes

Description

The new Refinery Sector Rule (RSR), passed by the EPA in December 2015, extends and strengthens the regulations governing stationary emission sources, specifically flares in refineries. It calls for the control and monitoring of flare systems, including, for example, meeting the specific requirements of Net Heating Value in combustion zone gas ( NHVcz), smokeless combustion and actual flare tip velocity(Vtip) for steam assist flare systems and additional Net Heating Value dilution parameter(NHVdil) for air assist flare systems. A flare control design, which takes live input of speed of sound from flare meters, was implemented to achieve real-time control using measurement of average molecular weight of an unknown hydrocarbon mixture from the sound of speed. This information can be used by the control system to determine the net heating value of vent gas as well as provide a dynamic ratio control for steam, this provides for a more efficient and responsive control scheme. Combined with the requirement of vent gas NHV imposed by Vtip, a continuous, efficient flare operation of supplemental gas will be demonstrated. By utilizing real time control via the speed of sound measurement provided by the flare meter, the risk of having a block of non-compliance is mitigated. Flare control systems using other schemes, such as controls based on feedbacks from Gas Chromatograph (GC) or calorimeters, were discussed in the paper. Practical implementation of this methodology and data are also discussed in this paper.

Date

Thursday, February 20, 2020

Time

1:30PM

Location

Room 408

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Chemical

Closed Loop Flare Operations and Remote Measurement of Flare Gas Flow Rate

Yousheng Zeng - Providence Photonics

Description

A Video Imaging Spectral Radiometry (VISR) device is integrated into a flare control system to automatically adjust steam assist based on the smoke level of the flare. The VISR device is also used to remotely measure flare gas flow rate. The results of these new features and applications will be presented.

Date

Thursday, February 20, 2020

Time

3:30PM

Location

Room 408

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Chemical

Flare Gas Measurement Lessons Learned from Refineries & Future of Chemical Plants

Arnold Griswold - Fluenta Inc.

Description

EPA’s Refinery Sector Rule is about to come online. The new rule will cover all aspects of combustion efficiency to ensure the flare operation is done in a manner that is safe for the environment and safe for the operation of the facility. Refineries will undoubtedly need to take some actions irrespective of whether they use steam or air assisted flares in order to ensure heating values of at least 300 BTU/scft of gas at the flare. This can be done by monitoring gas composition, steam/air flow and flare gas flow rate.As flow rate is part of the calculation supplied to meet the requirements put forward by the EPA, a gas flow meter will need to be used to provide that piece of the puzzle. This presentation will discuss how ultrasonic flow meters have been used to determine the flowrates in refineries and other facilities. A discussion will follow focused on how this technology helps the facility operator comply with the existing and new EPA regulations, and on how much more can be done from the metering perspective to help the implementation of the new EPA rule.

Date

Thursday, February 20, 2020

Time

3:30PM

Location

Room 416A

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Best Management Practices

Converting Your Emissions to Electricity and More

Mark Lancaster - Baker Hughes

Description

Baker Hughes is at the forefront of the next wave of smart and efficient energy technologies that help operators discover and produce oil and gas. Technology enabling the electrification of surface facilities and pressure pumping equipment offering significant potential for operational and efficiency gains.

Date

Friday, February 21, 2020

Time

8:00AM

Location

Room 617

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Chemical

“4G” Combustion Technology for Flares

Jason Voskuhl & Kurt Kraus - Honeywell UOP Callidus

Description

As flare regulations tighten there has been increased emphasis on monitoring and controlling flaring. While there have been advances in steam control systems and plume monitoring systems there has not been a fundamental change in flare combustion technology for decades. This presentation introduces “4G” combustion technology which changes the paradigm of currently available “3G” flare combustion technology, and sets the bar for the next generation of flare design.

Register Now →

Chemical

Meeting Flare Emissions Regulations with BTU Measurement

Tom Watson - AMETEK Process Instruments

Description

Learn how mass spectrometer technology can be used to meet emissions requirements by measuring BTU in the flare gas. This session will cover the methods of BTU determination, and will outline the advantages of a mass spectrometer analyzer - speed, accuracy, range, etc. - while discussing application specifics, and total cost of ownership and maintenance needs. There will also be a review of mass spectrometry technology, components, and functions.

Date

Thursday, February 20, 2020

Time

11:30AM

Location

Room 408

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Chemical

Measurement & Speciation Using Mass Spectroscopy Flare Gas Composition

Chuck deCarlo - Extrel Core Mass Spectrometers

Description

As refineries continue to optimize their approach RSR 63.670 compliance, new regulations for flare emissions are set to hit a broad range of industries over the next five years. The goal is to ensure the destruction of Hazardous Air Pollutants (HAPs) prior to release into the atmosphere, but drastic changes in vent gas composition make controlling that efficiency difficult. Getting the full composition of the vent gas quickly allows operations to apply corrections as soon as possible. Flare gas mass spectrometers measure hydrocarbons, carbon oxides, hydrogen, sulfurs, moisture and various volatile organics, and report concentrations and Net Heating Value (NHV) to the control system in seconds. Examples from recent ethylene flare gas regulations and MON sites will be covered in the discussion, along with data from oil refinery flare events.

Date

Thursday, February 20, 2020

Time

2:00PM

Location

Room 408

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Chemical

Flare Instrumentation – Minimum "Expectations"

Derek Stuck - Spectrum Environmental Solutions, LLC

Description

As the U.S. EPA begins expanding the flare requirements first found in the Refinery Sector Rule to other industries, newly affected facilities need to begin planning the installation of new monitoring on covered flares. This potentially includes pilot monitoring, visible emissions monitoring, vent gas flow monitoring, assist gas flow monitoring, and net heating value and/or composition monitoring; all of which will be required to meet the new requirements. This presentation will summarize the monitoring required by the new flare requirements and describe some of the technologies which may be used to comply with the regulations’ requirements.

Date

Thursday, February 20, 2020

Time

10:30AM

Location

Room 408

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Chemical

New Flare Requirements within the Ethylene, MON, and OLD MACTs

Herman Holm - Spectrum Environmental Solutions, LLC

Description

Regulations requiring improved monitoring and control of flares at petroleum refineries are starting to be passed along to other manufacturing sectors. In October 2019, the U.S. EPA proposed amendments to the Generic Maximum Achievable Control Technology Standards for Ethylene Production (EMACT). Among those amendments are new monitoring and operational requirements related to flares at ethylene production facilities. Also, in recent months, the U.S. EPA has published draft rules affecting organic liquid distribution (OLD) operations and portions of the chemical sector. These requirements are found in what are commonly referred to as the OLD MACT and Miscellaneous Organic NESHAP (MON). This presentation will summarize the new flare requirements and will draw heavily on the lessons learned from implementing the similar flare requirements in the refining sector.

Date

Thursday, February 20, 2020

Time

10:30AM

Location

Room 406

Register Now →

February 20th

Satisfying RSR at Turndown - Clayton Francis - Zeeco, Inc.

Clayton Francis - Zeeco, Inc.

Description

Nothing in plants must turn down like a flare. Lots of equipment achieve turndown rates 10:1, sophisticated transmitters might reach 1,000:1, yet a refinery flare can turn down 100,000:1. With the new rules applied, operators are experiencing unacceptable flame quality in this low range. Join a discussion on how those shortcomings were overcome.

Date

Thursday, February 20, 2020

Time

1:30PM

Location

Room 406

Register Now →

February 20th

Looking Down the Road: The Future of Ground Flares and AMELs

Troy Boley - Spectrum Environmental Solutions, LLC

Description

Facilities using pressure-assisted multi-point ground flares have requested Alternative Means of Emissions Limitations (AMELs) from the U.S. EPA to operate above the limits on exit velocity found in the General Provisions and Refinery Sector Rule. On October 9, 2019, the U.S. EPA proposed amendments to the Ethylene Maximum Achievable Control Technology (MACT) standards. These proposed changes include a new set of compliance requirements for ground flares without the need to request an AMEL. This presentation will review the new requirements for ground flares found in the Ethylene MACT draft rule. The presentation will also discuss how these proposed changes could affect ground flares in other sectors and the future of the AMEL process.

Date

Thursday, February 20, 2020

Time

3:30PM

Location

Room 406

Register Now →

February 20th

Flare CD Updates

Troy Boley - Spectrum Environmental Solutions

Description

Coming soon.

Date

Thursday, February 20, 2020

Time

2:00PM

Location

Room 416B

Register Now →

Chemical

“Hot Mic” Flare Panel – Moderated by Extrel and Spectrum Environmental Solutions

Multiple -

Description

An interactive panel focusing on regulatory compliance for flares.

Date

Thursday, February 20, 2020

Time

4:00PM

Location

Room 408

Register Now →

February 20th

“Hot Mic” Flare Panel – Moderated by Extrel and Spectrum Environmental Solutions

Multiple Speakers - Extrel and Spectrum Environmental Solutions

Description

Flare hot-topics discussed by multiple industry vendors.

Date

Thursday, February 20, 2020

Time

4:00PM

Location

Room 406

Register Now →

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