Environmental Compliance Presentations for Refining, Chemical, Oil & Gas
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Chemical

Eliminating H2S & SO2 Emissions at SRU, Coker and Other Sulfur Handling Units of Refineries

Jim Woodard, Sean Kirkpatrick - Vapor Point, LLC

Description

The Federal Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and state enforcement agencies have placed greater attention on the use of flares, and have in recent years placed new stringent regulations in place to directly impact flare operations (NSPS Subpart Ja), but are also imposing new National Ambient Emissions Standards Vapor Point applies high efficiency liquid scrubbing systems to eliminate Hydrogen Sulfide (H2S), Sulphur Dioxide (SO2) other Sulfur Species as well as other Hazardous Air Pollutants (HAPs) and Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs). Specially designed temporary vessels for liquid and vapor phase product management have also been developed and are key elements in some applications. These control system concepts and resulting proven processes were developed with input from refining personnel who needed alternative technologies that would offer operational flexibility eliminating the various sulfur contaminates. The vapor phase emission control systems and specially designed process vessels have met the needs of the refining industry with numerous field implementations. This paper/presentation will be focused on how the deployment of mobile technologies eliminates H2S & SO2 emissions resulting in improved worker safety while eliminating concerns with Ja regulations.

Date

Thursday

Time

11:00AM

Location

Room 406

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BWON

Downstream Confirmation of Benzene Loading

Kati Petersburg - Trinity Consultants

Description

Downstream flow rates and concentrations can reflect the characteristics of the total wastewater throughput managed at the facility, where all sewered wastewaters have come together into one stream. Experience indicates that downstream characterization can provide the most accurate values for facility wastewaters. However, the BWON citations emphasize the need to characterize wastes upstream, at the points of generation (POGs), because the rule-writers were concerned that benzene could volatilize from the waste as it flowed through the waste management system. Thus, the TAB quantification must be based on the upstream POG characterizations. It is valuable to assess the accuracy of POG results by comparing the downstream values with the sum of upstream POG values in the sewered streams. Although benzene is dynamic in a refinery sewer system—potentially volatilizing or transferring between the oil and water phases—it is reasonable to expect downstream loadings to be similar to the values derived from summing POG numbers. Agreement in the upstream-downstream evaluation lends confidence to the TAB quantification, the 6BQ or 2-Mg quantification (if needed), and the overall claim of the facility that the BWON wastes were properly identified.

Date

Thursday

Time

2:00PM

Location

Room 402

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Chemical

Autonomous Real-Time VOC Analyzer & Passive Fenceline Tubes – Data Comparison of New Technology to Method 325

Jason Robles - CAMSCO

Description

In accordance with Method 325, passive sorbent tubes are currently deployed and continuously sampling at refineries across the US & Canada. The method is also applied in a number of new applications including the Proposed Organic Liquids Distribution (OLD) rule, Consent Decrees, State Enforcement & Community Monitoring. With the popularity Method 325 is gaining, and the need to investigate elevated readings, there is a growing demand for real-time data. Camsco conducted a study comparing data generated from one of the latest real-time VOC analyzers and passive tubes. In this presentation, we will review comparison study results and discuss steps taken to bridge the gap between the analyzers real-time data & passive tubes analyzed via TD/GC/MS.

Date

Thursday

Time

11:00AM

Location

Room 415B

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2020

BWON Compliance Post-Consent Decree Era

Kati Petersburg - Trinity Consultants

Description

The refinery Consent Decrees added “enhanced provisions” to the BWON. Refineries complied by doing more than the BWON citations required, with the enhanced provisions sometimes dominating compliance demonstration. So what will happen as the Consent Decrees are terminated? Will all those enhanced provisions become a thing of the past? Or will it perhaps be advisable to retain some of them with as much attention as ever? The speaker brings decades of BWON compliance experience to a strategic analysis of what to do in the post-CD era.

Date

Thursday

Time

3:30PM

Location

Room 402

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Best Management Practices

How Do You Feel About Storing Your Emissions Data in the Cloud?

Matthew Radigan - REGS, LLC

Description

Cloud computing means storing and accessing data and programs over the Internet instead of your computer's hard drive. In order to implement a cloud solution, you need some basic tools to connect your data source(s) to the Internet. Connection to the cloud storage needs to be secure, reliable and accessible. Turn on any new WiFi enable device, click through some prompts and you are connected. Technology made it so easy that it doesn’t even require a conscious thought to participate. Will the same environment that drives my social life translate to my workplace and more importantly, help me successful manage my critical air emissions compliance data. Required tools, feasibility and practicality of using cloud computing for compliance applications will be covered during the presentation.

Date

Thursday

Time

12:00PM

Location

Room 417A

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CEMS

Common CEMS Program Audit Findings

Eric Wiley - VIM Technologies

Description

Issues of non-compliance and poor system performance are frequently discovered during CEMS program audits. The presentation will also focus on best practice implementation that can assist facilities in ensuring that their CEMS programs are compliant with applicable regulatory requirements and help utilize limited resources as efficiently as possible. Real world examples of CEMS audit findings will be outlined and ways to avoid such issues will be discussed.

Date

Thursday

Time

1:30PM

Location

Room 404

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Chemical

Federal, State and Local Enforcement

James Smith - Crain, Caton, & James

Description

The presentation will highlight recent federal environmental enforcement trends and update state and local enforcement developments.

Date

Thursday

Time

1:30PM

Location

Room 416B

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BWON

On-Going BWON Compliance Concerns

Ken Garing - Ken Garing & Associates

Description

Compliance issues with the BWON requirements have evolved since the regulation was introduced in the 90’s. In the early 2000’s, numerous deficiencies, ranging from the identification of regulated waste streams to the proper operation of control equipment, resulted in enhanced BWON requirements being included in the refinery global consent decrees. Since that time, a tremendous amount of work has been directed to this effort and the refining sector has made great strides in improving compliance with the BWON regulation. Mr. Garing will present his thoughts on where current efforts could be focused to further improve compliance.

Date

Thursday

Time

10:30AM

Location

Room 402

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2020

Calculating Project Increases

Johnny Vermillion - Spirit Environmental

Description

Do you find Major New Source Review applicability confusing? Have you noticed that even the initial step of trying to figure out project increases (much less the rest of the program) already starts to descend into a confusing mess? When it comes to calculating project increases these days, the “devil is in the details”. This presentation will provide background and suggested approaches on the new the EPA guidelines along with insight on some states’ decision on implementation.

Date

Thursday

Time

11:30AM

Location

Room 412

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CEMS

Common CEMS RATA Failures and Risks

Paula Metz - Alliance Source Testing

Description

This presentation will focus on thing that may cause a CEMS RATA to fail and what can be done on the facility side and by the stack tester to reduce the potential for failures.

Date

Thursday

Time

11:00AM

Location

Room 404

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Chemical

How Digital Transformation Can Impact Compliance for Environmental and Safety Regulation

Marcelo Carugo, Marcio Donnangelo, & Steve Probst - Emerson Automation Solutions

Description

This presentation will give you an overview of how Digital Transformation is eliminating layers of complexity to bring pre–interpreted field data directly to those who need to make decisions and take action. Two examples will be highlighted: Environmental reporting involves flow measurements which must be verified to be accurate. Discovery of an inaccurate measurement can be costly for operators as they may pay fines from the last date they can prove accurate measurement. Meter verification tools make it simple and convenient to prove accuracy over time. Operators will be notified of problems immediately to avoid misreporting and allowing for immediate corrective action. PRVs are no longer isolated mechanical devices that rely on manual rounds as part of a preventive maintenance program. Release and leakage alerts can be wirelessly monitored, and then integrated into reporting and analytical systems. Powerful tools are now available to interpret these patterns and predict future releases before they occur.

Date

Thursday

Time

10:30AM

Location

Room 417B

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CEMS

Particulate Testing: Modern Solutions to Modern Limits

Justin Sullivan - Alliance Source Testing

Description

Particulate matter (PM) with diameters less than 10 and 2.5 micrometers pose a significant health risk to local communities. Because of this, regulations regarding PM 10 and PM 2.5 are ever increasing. The methodology used to test for PM is advancing to meet the needs of modern standards. Other Test Method (OTM) 37 offers a superior approach to PM testing as compared to traditional sampling techniques. This discussion will take an in depth look at several side by side comparisons of data from OTM 37 and traditional sampling methods. Topics discussed will include reduced test time, greater analytical sensitivity, and decreased bias from interferents.

Date

Thursday

Time

3:00PM

Location

Room 404

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Chemical

Turnaround LDAR Best Management Practices

Jeff Diehl - Think Environmental

Description

Description coming soon.

Date

Thursday

Time

11:30AM

Location

Room 400

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Chemical

Alternative Work Practice: How Revisions May Affect Refineries

Karen Marsh - US EPA

Description

On December 22, 2008, EPA published a voluntary alternative work practice for LDAR using optical gas imaging. Since promulgation, advancements have been made in leak detection technologies that warrant examination of revisions to the alternative work practice. EPA plans to propose revisions to the alternative work practice in 2020 which may impact how refineries would implement the alternative. This presentation will discuss key questions, related to refineries, that EPA is considering during development of this proposal.

Date

Thursday

Time

12:00PM

Location

Room 400

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Chemical

Are You Ready? Contingency Planning for the RMP Amendments and Litigation

Justin Savage, Simone Jones - Sidley Austin, LLP

Description

The RMP Amendments impose several burdensome obligations, including reporting up to the Board of Directors. EPA’s attempt to repeal or narrow the amendments will likely be tied up in litigation in the DC Circuit, but in the meantime, compliance deadlines are soon approaching. In the midst of this uncertainty, this session will discuss the DC Circuit litigation, enforcement trends, and planning for the amendments.

Date

Thursday

Time

11:00AM

Location

Room 416B

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Best Management Practices

Boiler and Process Heater Tuning as a Best Management Practice

John Bacon - TRC Consulting

Description

While most facilities perceive 40 CFR 63 Subpart DDDDD (Boiler and Heater MACT, or MACT DDDDD) as costly regulation, four years of data compiled from the annually and biennially recurring tune-ups indicates the opposite is true. In fact, regular boiler and process heater tuning for natural gas fired sources can lead to considerable cost savings related to fuel use and a simple payback on the tune-ups services within months. The purpose of this presentation is intended to enlighten the audience on the benefits of boiler and process heater tuning, using data compiled from tune-ups performed on nearly 600 combustion sources, and conducted in accordance with the Boiler MACT work practice standard. Also, how a facility can further benefit from the regular performance of these services beyond the regulatory framework.

Date

Thursday

Time

4:00PM

Location

Room 417A

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Chemical

Leveraging Digital Twin technology to reduce inspection-related defects and optimize your LDAR program

Boun Sananikone, David Tullos - Bureau Veritas

Description

LDAR programs are based upon accurate inspections, timely repair, and proper identification of required components which need to monitored. Without the aforementioned, components working in parallel, your program maybe missing critical inspection points. Learn how Bureau Veritas is improving internal quality and helping our clients develop world-class fugitive emissions programs through our methodology.

Date

Thursday

Time

2:30PM

Location

Room 400

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Chemical

The Forecast for Your LDAR Program Looks Cloudy, and Why That’s a Good Thing

Christopher Tucker - InspectionLogic Corporation

Description

InspectionLogic has worked hard to move LDAR to a cloud based solution. We have learned a ton along the way and the benefits for everyone involved are huge! Come learn why moving your LDAR program to the cloud is a good thing and how it will benefit you, your facility, and your technicians. Topics will include data security, data accessibility, and what an “always connected” handset really means for LDAR technicians.

Date

Thursday

Time

1:30PM

Location

Room 400

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BWON

Vapor Lock Scrubber Technology Reducing Carbon Usage for BWON Compliance

Jim Woodard, Jeff St. Amant - Vapor Point, LLC

Description

Vapor Point has been contracted by many refining clients, who have been challenged with the proper design of BWON related controls, to determine the most effective control system when considering cost and efficiency. The challenge with many BWON applications is the significant variability in contaminate concentrations which poses challenges in designing the vapor control system. Predominately, activated carbon is considered a BACT for BWON applications, while thermal oxidizers/combustors are also considered BACT, but not as widely utilized. Changing emissions characteristics of a refinery waste system, can render a well-conceived design selection ineffective. This discussion will focus on carbon absorption systems and how incorporating the VaporLockTM under the correct circumstances improves the system design providing improved margins through direct (activated carbon changeouts), and indirect costs savings (unaccounted for man hours for carbon changeouts/exchanges, and environmental management associated with monitoring and NESHAP requirements for new and spent carbon canisters). We’d like to further highlight, that over the past nine years, we have encountered several clients that elected to utilize a combustion device due to the peak loading during high emission events, ultimately recognizing increased costs due to propane/fuel consumption and maintenance downtime due to the operating conditions of the combustion device. This presentation will review a specific application where Vapor Point was enlisted by a Major Gulf Coast Refinery to investigate the ability to decrease carbon usage at a sump emissions control point which was part of the facilities BWON program. Vapor phase carbon is required per the site’s consent decree as the primary control device at various control points across the facility. The client selected one area where a significant increase in carbon consumption had occurred over a period of time. This sump emissions control point was selected as the pilot project for the installation of Vapor Point’s proprietary liquid scrubber system to decrease the loading of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and specifically the benzene on the primary control device, vapor phase carbon.

Date

Thursday

Time

3:00PM

Location

Room 402

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Chemical

Ultra-Low Steam Consumption, High Capacity Smokeless Flare

Clayton Francis - Zeeco

Description

This paper will introduce the technology behind, test data for, and industry challenges addressed by a new Ultra-Low Steam Consumption, High Capacity Smokeless Flare design developed by Zeeco, Inc. This flare technology is designed to further improve flaring efficiency and reduce steam consumption while continuing to meet the EPA Code of Federal Regulations, Chapter 1, Subchapter C, Part 63, Subpart CC requirements. We will focus on how the design addresses known industry challenges in high capacity, low steam consumption flaring, such as needing the ability to operate at low flare gas pressure since many applications have a maximum flare gas pressure at the flare tip of 3 psig. The paper will detail how this new design can achieve as low as 0.17 lbs. steam / lbs. flare gas at 20% of maximum flow rate, with the maximum flow rate achieved at a flare gas pressure of 3 psig. The above data is based upon a 5 mph wind with less than Ringlemann 1 opacity and a flare gas that is 100% propylene. For smokeless operation with propylene, other current steam assisted flare designs require approximately 0.5 lbs. steam / lbs. flare gas and / or a much higher flare gas pressure at maximum flaring capacity. Ultra-Low Consumption Steam Assisted Flaring is very important since any reduction in the required steam flow rate saves not only money, but also reduces the emissions produced from the production of the required higher steam flows. A key feature of this technology is that the air and steam mixture leave the flare at the same elevation as the flare tip exit, meaning no pre-mixing of air into the flare stream. Other current industry designs mix the air and steam with the flare gas prior to exiting the flare tip, negatively impacting the NHVcz according to the new calculation parameters required by MACT CC. Zeeco’s design more efficiently mixes the steam and air together and then mixes the resulting stream with the flare gas, creating a final mixture with a significantly increased volume of air. When the resulting mixture interacts with the flare gas at the tip exit, the increased air volume is readily available for combustion, meaning the flare is less likely to smoke. Since the design more efficiently mixes the air and steam together, less steam is required to achieve smokeless operation. Furthermore, the inherent efficiency of the mixing delivers a design less dependent upon using flare gas pressure to achieve smokeless operation. The flare can successfully operate at lower gas pressures at maximum flow rate.

Date

Thursday

Time

2:00PM

Location

Room 406

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Chemical

It's Not Dead, It's Mostly Dead - CD Termination

Suzanne Murray - HaynesBoone

Description

What is the process for terminating a consent decree with EPA and the Department of Justice? Is the process improved in this Administration or are terminations still stalled by disagreements over terms and what does "done" mean? This presentation will walk through the current overview of PRI CDs that have been terminated and lessons learned for those still open and for future agreements.

Date

Thursday

Time

10:30AM

Location

Room 416B

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Air Permitting

New Building Downwash Options in AERMOD

Sergio Guerra - GHD Services

Description

The presentation will cover the new building downwash options included in the August 2019 version of AERMOD. The current Plume Rise Model Enhancements (PRIME) formulation in AERMOD has a number of theoretical flaws that have been documented on the treatment of downwash in AERMOD. A renewed interest and scrutiny of these downwash shortcomings fueled a parallel, yet complementary, effort led by industry and EPA. These efforts led to the new experimental Alpha options available in the new version of AERMOD. These Alpha options were developed by the PRIME2 committee and EPA’s Office of Research and Development The current presentation will cover the new Alpha options developed along with the implications of this new process to add new science to the regulatory model.

Date

Thursday

Time

3:00PM

Location

Room 412

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Chemical

Safety Showers and Location Awareness - Improving Safety with Wireless Monitoring

Marcio Donnangelo - Emerson Automation Solutions

Description

Think you’re covered? Radios aren’t always enough. Find out how to improve safety by monitoring safety shower and eye–wash stations, as well as comply with OSHA without incurring complex installation and deployment costs. A safety shower system integration using wireless technology is not only cost–effective but can provide instant alerts and quick and effective response time.

Date

Thursday

Time

1:00PM

Location

Room 417B

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Chemical

New and Emerging Fenceline Monitoring Technologies: Current vs Emerging Technology Strategies for Sampling and Quantitation of HRVOC and OHAP in Ambient and Emission Sources

Peter Zemek - Montrose Environmental

Description

Various types of sampling and analysis strategies have been developed and implemented for the identification and quantitation of HRVOC and other OHAP. This presentation will present the advantages and disadvantages of the current testing methods, and compare and contrast them to emerging technologies that are currently in development for the field and laboratory. Discussion will focus on sampling and analysis techniques including gas chromatography via USEPA Method 18, USEPA Method 320 for organics, optically enhanced FTIR for low level detection of specific organic analytes, and quantitation of various ultra-low detection limit concentrations of HRVOC and OHAP using real-time Proton Transfer Time of Flight Mass Spectroscopy (PTR) and GC Interfaced PTR compliance testing by EPA Method 18. Emphasis will be placed on the emerging technologies utilized by PTR mass spectrometry instrumentation.

Date

Thursday

Time

1:30PM

Location

Room 415B

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Chemical

Flare System Control and Optimization at Refineries and Chemical Plants

Lei Sui - Baker Hughes

Description

The new Refinery Sector Rule (RSR), passed by the EPA in December 2015, extends and strengthens the regulations governing stationary emission sources, specifically flares in refineries. It calls for the control and monitoring of flare systems, including, for example, meeting the specific requirements of Net Heating Value in combustion zone gas ( NHVcz), smokeless combustion and actual flare tip velocity(Vtip) for steam assist flare systems and additional Net Heating Value dilution parameter(NHVdil) for air assist flare systems. A flare control design, which takes live input of speed of sound from flare meters, was implemented to achieve real-time control using measurement of average molecular weight of an unknown hydrocarbon mixture from the sound of speed. This information can be used by the control system to determine the net heating value of vent gas as well as provide a dynamic ratio control for steam, this provides for a more efficient and responsive control scheme. Combined with the requirement of vent gas NHV imposed by Vtip, a continuous, efficient flare operation of supplemental gas will be demonstrated. By utilizing real time control via the speed of sound measurement provided by the flare meter, the risk of having a block of non-compliance is mitigated. Flare control systems using other schemes, such as controls based on feedbacks from Gas Chromatograph (GC) or calorimeters, were discussed in the paper. Practical implementation of this methodology and data are also discussed in this paper.

Date

Thursday

Time

1:30PM

Location

Room 408

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Air Permitting

Upcoming MACT Residual Risk and Technology Reviews - What to Expect and Lessons Learned from the Refinery Sector Rule (RSR)

Rose E. Waypa - Barr Engineering

Description

EPA has proposed multiple updates to rules following a residual risk and technology review (RTR) that will incorporate 2015 Refinery Sector Rule (RSR) requirements into rules affecting the chemical and petrochemical industries, including facilities subject to the National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAP) for Miscellaneous Organic Chemical Manufacturing (MON), Organic Liquids Distribution (OLD), and Ethylene Production. Proposed rule updates include incorporating new work practice standards (i.e., pressure relief devices and maintenance vents), developing innovative outside-the-unit monitoring techniques (i.e., fenceline monitoring), establishing comprehensive control device operating requirements (i.e., flares), addressing startup and shutdown operations against continuous emissions limits, and modernizing reporting and recordkeeping requirements (i.e.,CEDRI and ERT), all consistent with the final RSR updates. This presentation will focus on lessons learned from the implementation and the first year of compliance with the final RSR updates, and how those lessons learned can be applied to the industries affected by the latest RTRs. The presentation will include a step-wise approach to identifying compliance gaps, developing a work plan, and implementing new monitoring equipment and compliance procedures.

Date

Thursday

Time

11:00AM

Location

Room 412

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Chemical

Advantages of Hot-Filter Cooled OGI technology for Leak Detection and Quantification

Ram Hashmonay - Opgal

Description

The ability to manually replace or automatically swap filters in an OGI camera provide many advantages for various OGI applications. This presentation reviews several OGI applications, where swapping the filter provides better detection sensitivity, longer range, compounds' classification, and more accurate quantification.

Date

Thursday

Time

11:00AM

Location

Room 400

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Chemical

The Transformation of LDAR: Predictive Leak Management Software

Brian Whitley - Emission Monitoring Service, Inc. (EMSI)

Description

Description coming soon.

Date

Thursday

Time

2:00PM

Location

Room 400

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Best Management Practices

Barr will demonstrate its free Microsoft Excel spreadsheet tools for storage tank emissions, LDAR program review and compliance reporting, and MACT CC flare NHVcz standards

Corey Mead - Barr Engineering

Description

Description coming soon

Date

Thursday

Time

11:30AM

Location

Room 417A

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Chemical

Same Road; Different Trees

Daniel Boreman - Emission Monitoring Service, Inc. (EMSI)

Description

In an environment where so much emphasis is placed on safety, it is easy for workers to lose sight of who is truly responsible for individual safety. Complacency is arguably one of the biggest hazards faced by LDAR monitoring technicians in the field environment. This presentation highlights just how easy it is, even with the best intentions, to become complacent and offers some techniques to get workers re-focused and combat complacency.

Date

Thursday

Time

12:30PM

Location

Room 410

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Air Permitting

Texas Ozone Nonattainment Area Reclassification & Potential Implications on Your Operations

Kristin Gordon - ALL4 Inc.

Description

In ALL4’s presentation, we will discuss the September 23, 2019 USEPA reclassification of the Houston-Galveston-Brazoria (HGB) and Dallas-Fort Worth (DFW) nonattainment areas to serious nonattainment for the 2008 eight-hour ozone NAAQS. We will share the potential impacts on facilities located in the HGB and DFW areas including but not limited to: - Updates to major source nitrogen oxides (NOx) and volatile organic compounds (VOC) potential to emit (PTE) thresholds; - Construction and operating permits implications (New Source Review and Title V Operating Permits); - Permit by Rule (PBR) and Standard Permit authorization registration and/or certification of emissions via E-permitting mechanism; and - Timeline for demonstrating compliance.

Date

Thursday

Time

1:00PM

Location

Room 412

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BWON

A Wastewater Solution for an Air Pollution Problem

Todd Lusk - SLR Consulting

Description

The regulatory requirements for managing benzene- and VOC-laden streams from wastewater treatment units require refineries to implement vapor control technologies that are often expensive to implement and/or operate. This session presents another option – the VOC BioTreatTM process, an alternative control technology that utilizes unit operations already in place at most wastewater treatment facilities and can substantially reduce the costs associated with BWON compliance. The presentation will provide information on the necessary steps to evaluate, model, test, and implement the VOC BioTreatTM process, and will describe case studies to support the economic and environmental benefits.

Date

Thursday

Time

11:00AM

Location

Room 402

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Chemical

Closed Loop Flare Operations and Remote Measurement of Flare Gas Flow Rate

Yousheng Zeng - Providence Photonics

Description

A Video Imaging Spectral Radiometry (VISR) device is integrated into a flare control system to automatically adjust steam assist based on the smoke level of the flare. The VISR device is also used to remotely measure flare gas flow rate. The results of these new features and applications will be presented.

Date

Thursday

Time

3:30PM

Location

Room 408

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Air Permitting

Photochemical Modeling for Ozone Inter-Precursor Trading

Qi Zhang - GHD Services

Description

In a typical ozone Nonattainment New Source Review (NNSR) project, one requirement is to offset the project emissions of the ozone precursor (nitrogen oxides [NOx] or volatile organic compounds [VOCs]) with emissions reduction credits (ERCs) obtained from a source within the nonattainment area. As allowed by many state agencies, sometimes permit applicants choose to offset one ozone precursor with another precursor for various reasons, primary due to the ERCs for one precursor being unavailable or too expensive. To support this inter-precursor trading, state agencies and the United States Environmental Protection Agency (US EPA) require a photochemical grid modeling analysis to demonstrate the inter-precursor trading will not adversely affect the area’s attainment demonstration.

Date

Thursday

Time

2:30PM

Location

Room 412

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Air Permitting

Air Quality Tools for the 21st Century

Robert Opiela - NaviKnow

Description

The air quality permitting process is a data-driven process. Federal permit applicability (do you trigger PSD?), netting calculations, rule applicability, emission calculations, etc. require input data. A permit application cannot be prepared or reviewed without access to the necessary information required by the rules and regulations. Finding, retrieving, and manipulating the dozens of available data sets adds days, even weeks to the processes to prepare and review the permit application. Do you really want to expedite the air quality permit process? NaviKnow Solutions has developed 21st century tools where you can easily locate, access, and download the information needed to complete or review air quality permit applications ALL in one location. We have also developed tools to significantly automate the application review. See how a significant amount of time can be shaved off the air quality permit application process without having to pay for an "expedited" permit application review.

Date

Thursday

Time

1:30PM

Location

Room 412

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BWON

BWON Auditing

Bart Leininger - Ashworth Leininger Group

Description

The National Emission Standard for Benzene Waste Operations (BWON or Subpart FF) is a complex regulation that is difficult to assess in the context of a due diligence assessment. These assessments are conducted within compressed schedules, essential documentation is typically limited or unavailable, and the liabilities for non-compliance are significant. Given the complexity of the BWON regulation, even a seasoned practitioner can miss a significant compliance issue, which could result in a costly corrective actions and potential enforcement exposure for a new owner. Further complicating the due diligence are Subpart FF enhanced requirements mandated in Consent Decrees. Assessing compliance with these enhanced requirements is just as important as compliance with the regulation itself. Given this complex backdrop, Subpart FF assessment during a due diligence must have a laser focus on those requirements of most importance for the acquisition. This presentation draws upon the presenter’s experience in performing detailed Subpart FF assessments in the context of a due diligence and from litigation related to BWON compliance. The presentation uses case study examples to illustrate key areas of inquiry that should be part of the assessment, and provides helpful and practical recommendations for evaluating key aspects of a Subpart FF compliance program. This presentation will also be of interest to BWON professionals with ongoing operations as it provides a “mental checklist” of areas of potential exposure in their BWON compliance program.

Date

Thursday

Time

11:30AM

Location

Room 402

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Chemical

Avoiding Under-Reporting and Over-Reporting of Fenceline Plant Emissions

James Shinkle - Optical Scientific

Description

Using a point measurement wind sensor for fenceline applications will result in under or over-estimating large body wind movement from your plant. OSI’s Long-baseline Optical Anemometer provides path-averaged wind data to give you an honest and accurate picture of plant emissions and can be a valuable tool in the case of an accidental release.

Date

Thursday

Time

11:30AM

Location

Room 415B

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Chemical

Flare Gas Measurement Lessons Learned from Refineries & Future of Chemical Plants

Arnold Griswold - Fluenta Inc.

Description

EPA’s Refinery Sector Rule is about to come online. The new rule will cover all aspects of combustion efficiency to ensure the flare operation is done in a manner that is safe for the environment and safe for the operation of the facility. Refineries will undoubtedly need to take some actions irrespective of whether they use steam or air assisted flares in order to ensure heating values of at least 300 BTU/scft of gas at the flare. This can be done by monitoring gas composition, steam/air flow and flare gas flow rate.As flow rate is part of the calculation supplied to meet the requirements put forward by the EPA, a gas flow meter will need to be used to provide that piece of the puzzle. This presentation will discuss how ultrasonic flow meters have been used to determine the flowrates in refineries and other facilities. A discussion will follow focused on how this technology helps the facility operator comply with the existing and new EPA regulations, and on how much more can be done from the metering perspective to help the implementation of the new EPA rule.

Date

Thursday

Time

3:30PM

Location

Room 416A

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Best Management Practices

Integrating Speciation Data For Chemical Plants and Refineries

John Beath - JBE

Description

A surprising number of reports rely on chemical speciation data for purchased chemicals, feedstocks, intermediate streams and products. Recent experience with an EPA NEIC inspection underscored the value in centralizing this data for consistency. Calculations related to quantities present onsite (Tier Two), release reporting and threshold determinations (EPCRA/SARA), emissions calculations (EI/TRI), TSCA Manufacturing Inventory (coming in 2020), RMP (Maximum Intended Inventory), PSM (operator process information), OSHA Hazard Communication, and permit applications could benefit from a carefully orchestrated process. Imagine if the system you develop internally could answer simple questions for emergency situations like what’s the composition of the material in that drum, or that heat exchanger; and imagine if a process was in place to keep all of the content revised as process changes occur.

Date

Thursday

Time

11:00AM

Location

Room 417A

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Best Management Practices

MPV, PRD & MSS Best Management Practices at Refineries & Opportunities for Chemical Plants

Troy Knuston & Meg Sloan - Sinclair Oil & Sage ATC

Description

Sinclair Wyoming Refining Company (SWRC) and Sage ATC will lead a diverse panel discussion examining the practical and technical challenges presented by implementing the Refinery Sector Rule miscellaneous process vent (MPV) and maintenance vent documentation requirements into everyday compliance. On the practical side, SWRC will discuss unique challenges faced at the refinery level, including MPV group classification, monitoring and documenting maintenance activities, and helping operators understand and adjust to the new requirements. On the technical side, Sage ATC will discuss broader industry perspectives including efficient approaches to tracking and monitoring maintenance activities, a deep dive to MPV monitoring and compliance management, and strategic considerations when developing and implementing MPV procedures and practices. The panel discussion will be interactive and adaptive. Members of the audience will be polled to determine the practical, technical, and legal issues that the audience members are facing, and the presentation will be adapted to focus on the issues of greatest interest. Members of the audience will also be polled to submit questions, e.g., technical and legal questions or concerns that they may not be comfortable having attributed to their companies.

Date

Thursday

Time

1:30PM

Location

Room 416A

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Chemical

Assessing the Human Health Risks to Fugitive Airborne Ethylene Oxide Emissions

Benjamin Chandler - GHD Services

Description

A recent study by the US EPA Integrated Risk Information System indicated and increased carcinogenic potential for community exposures to airborne Ethylene oxide (EtO) around facilities using EtO. The resulting changes to the EtO risk criteria by the US EPA have increased public scrutiny for EtO users to reduce emissions and ensure healthy conditions within neighboring communities. This presentation will focus on strategies for measuring ambient levels of EtO in outside air for the purpose of determining potential human health risks. Integrated air sampling methodologies will be discussed along with predictive air dispersion modeling capabilities and emission control solutions. A brief history of the EPA rule changes for Texas will also be presented as the basis for regulatory compliance.

Date

Thursday

Time

11:30AM

Location

Room 416A

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Chemical

“4G” Combustion Technology for Flares

Jason Voskuhl & Kurt Kraus - Honeywell UOP Callidus

Description

As flare regulations tighten there has been increased emphasis on monitoring and controlling flaring. While there have been advances in steam control systems and plume monitoring systems there has not been a fundamental change in flare combustion technology for decades. This presentation introduces “4G” combustion technology which changes the paradigm of currently available “3G” flare combustion technology, and sets the bar for the next generation of flare design.

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Chemical

Safety's Competitive Advantage and the Future of the Safety, Health, and Environmental Profession - Colin Brown - Board of Certified Safety Professionals

Colin Brown - Board of Certified Safety Professionals

Description

Compliance with state and federal regulations is the absolute minimum and does not ensure the safety and health of workers. Safety and health in today's dynamic industry space must no longer be defined as the absence of harm and death. How do you turn safety into a competitive advantage, and what does the future hold for the profession entrusted with employee and customer well-being? This presentation highlights how professional development through accredited certification can change organizational culture and drive results through SH&E leadership. Learning Objectives Upon completion, the participant will be able to: Describe why compliance is not enough to reduce injuries and loss in construction. Recognize at least three ways that safety makes a company competitive. Leverage training and certification to drive higher levels of safety and productivity. Show how H&S is important not only for workers but also for front-line supervisors and executives.

Date

Thursday

Time

1:30PM

Location

Room 410

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Chemical

Flare Instrumentation – Minimum "Expectations"

Derek Stuck - Spectrum Environmental Solutions, LLC

Description

As the U.S. EPA begins expanding the flare requirements first found in the Refinery Sector Rule to other industries, newly affected facilities need to begin planning the installation of new monitoring on covered flares. This potentially includes pilot monitoring, visible emissions monitoring, vent gas flow monitoring, assist gas flow monitoring, and net heating value and/or composition monitoring; all of which will be required to meet the new requirements. This presentation will summarize the monitoring required by the new flare requirements and describe some of the technologies which may be used to comply with the regulations’ requirements.

Date

Thursday

Time

10:30AM

Location

Room 408

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Best Management Practices

Process Burner Flames: The Good, the Bad, and The Ugly

Charles Baukal, Bill Weimer, & John McGuire - John Zink Co. LLC

Description

John Zink Hamworthy Combustion field personnel inspect thousands of burners each year. Too often those flames are not only bad but sometimes potentially dangerous. There are a number of conditions needed for good flames. Burners should be operating at or near their design conditions which includes the excess air and draft levels, and the design firing rate (fuel pressure) and fuel composition. The combustion air must be properly distributed, the fuel must be clean, and both the air and fuel must be properly controlled. The burner and its associated equipment (e.g., tile and pilot) must also be properly installed and maintained. There are some visual indicators that should be checked for proper burner operation. These include uniformity (all flames in a given heater should normally look about the same), proper flame color, no leaning between flames or into process tubes, no pronounced hot spots or dark spots on the burner tiles, no irregular flame movement (e.g., no pulsing), and no unusual sounds (e.g., flashback). Bad flames can lead to increased pollution emissions, reduced thermal efficiency, and unplanned shutdowns. Common reasons for bad flames include improper burner maintenance and operation. Dirty fuel is particularly problematic as it can cause fuel injectors to plug which can create multiple problems. Ugly flames can be dangerous and need to be corrected as soon as possible. Examples of these irregular flames include flame impingement, huffing or pulsing, or severely lifted flames. The purpose of this presentation is to discuss proper burner operation and what good flames look like and then to contrast that with lots of examples of improper burner operation including the causes and corrections. This information can be used in the risk-based inspection and performance monitoring processes. Typically, equipment has a function statement (primary/secondary) and performance objectives and ranges. The consequences when the function of the equipment has failed is documented in the earlier processes.

Date

Thursday

Time

10:30AM

Location

Room 417A

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BWON

BWON Masterclass

Steve Probst - 4C Marketplace and Conference

Description

Coming soon.

Date

Thursday

Time

12:00PM

Location

Room 402

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Chemical

Meeting Flare Emissions Regulations with BTU Measurement

Tom Watson - AMETEK Process Instruments

Description

Learn how mass spectrometer technology can be used to meet emissions requirements by measuring BTU in the flare gas. This session will cover the methods of BTU determination, and will outline the advantages of a mass spectrometer analyzer - speed, accuracy, range, etc. - while discussing application specifics, and total cost of ownership and maintenance needs. There will also be a review of mass spectrometry technology, components, and functions.

Date

Thursday

Time

11:30AM

Location

Room 408

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Chemical

Portable GC for Fenceline Monitoring

Chris Schepcoff - SGS Galson

Description

Coming soon.

Date

Thursday

Time

3:00PM

Location

Room 415B

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Chemical

Optical Flow Sensors for Environmental Compliance and Process Control

Donn Williams - Optical Scientific

Description

OSI's Optical Flow Sensor (OFS) can help you comply with EPA’s Organic Liquids Distribution MACT, RSR and Ja regulations. Unaffected by temperature, pressure, density or gas concentration, OFS makes drift-free flow measurements on flare stacks, thermal oxidizers and a host of similar routine and extreme processes alike with no shutdown needed to install.

Date

Thursday

Time

12:00PM

Location

Room 408

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Chemical

Measurement & Speciation Using Mass Spectroscopy Flare Gas Composition

Chuck deCarlo - Extrel Core Mass Spectrometers

Description

As refineries continue to optimize their approach RSR 63.670 compliance, new regulations for flare emissions are set to hit a broad range of industries over the next five years. The goal is to ensure the destruction of Hazardous Air Pollutants (HAPs) prior to release into the atmosphere, but drastic changes in vent gas composition make controlling that efficiency difficult. Getting the full composition of the vent gas quickly allows operations to apply corrections as soon as possible. Flare gas mass spectrometers measure hydrocarbons, carbon oxides, hydrogen, sulfurs, moisture and various volatile organics, and report concentrations and Net Heating Value (NHV) to the control system in seconds. Examples from recent ethylene flare gas regulations and MON sites will be covered in the discussion, along with data from oil refinery flare events.

Date

Thursday

Time

2:00PM

Location

Room 408

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Chemical

SPOD: Continuous VOC Monitoring for Targeted Grab Sample Acquisition

Jacob Melby - SENSIT Technologies

Description

The SENSIT® SPOD is solar-powered fenceline monitoring system for VOCs. This low-powered, easily deployable system combines wind and VOC measurements to identify and locate emission sources in real-time. When combined with the highly configurable sample acquisition system, the SENSIT SPOD can enable targeted grab sampling using evacuated canisters or sorption tubes for later laboratory VOC analysis.

Date

Thursday

Time

2:00PM

Location

Room 415B

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CEMS

Comprehensive CEMS Stack 102: Process Optimization

Dean Kotecki - Envea

Description

Continuous monitoring instruments for bag–house filter performance control, bag leak detectors, flue gas & solid flow moisture monitoring, level detection, reagent injection control, etc. allowing the optimization of your processes: raw material & energy savings, reduction of environmental impacts.

Date

Thursday

Time

3:30PM

Location

Room 404

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Chemical

Opening Up the Opportunities for Performance Verification and Reliability Enhancement of Valves

Dave Anderson - Score Valves

Description

Most fugitive emission reduction / elimination efforts in the industrial community, especially at chemical and refining facilities have been focused on component monitoring with the implementation of LDAR (Leak Detection and Repair) programs. USEPA studies have shown that the vast majority (between 80 and 90%) of fugitive emissions are associated with valve and connector leaks . While necessary, LDAR programs are, by definition, concerned with fixing leaks when they are encountered, not preventing them. Further, it could be argued that the greatest contribution to lowering fugitive emission rates from connectors and valves is through the use of consistent time-tested assembly and maintenance procedures, and the selection of the best available technology in terms of lowest emission valve packings, gaskets, torqueing equipment, and other equipment. An overview of best practices for achieving lowest fugitive emission rates for bolted flange connectors and valves including a fugitive emissions model for gasketed connectors will be presented.

Date

Thursday

Time

3:30PM

Location

Room 400

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Chemical

California Rule 1180 Fence Line Monitoring Regulation: Lessons Learned and planning for Regulatory Compliance

Gilad Shpitzer - Atmosfir Optics Ltd.

Description

Atmosfir Optics, Ltd, will discuss California’s South Coast’s Air Quality Measurement Division’s Rule 1180 fence-line monitoring requirements, how they came into existence, where they protect public health, and where there are inconsistencies as applied to known risk levels. We will discuss cost effective ways to apply advanced technology that can quickly adapt to potential upcoming requirements from other regulators that may use this rule as a model. Lessons learned from supporting a refinery’s response will be presented.

Date

Thursday

Time

1:00PM

Location

Room 415B

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Chemical

New Absorption Technology for VOC Capture

Ray Ozdemir and Jeff St. Amant - Framergy Inc. & Vapor Point, LLC

Description

"While technology focus in our industry has been centered on automation and monitoring capabilities, little new science has been developed. Vapor Point working with its partner framergy, Inc have begun exploring the industrial usability of a new material science known as Metal Organic Frameworks. Through this partnership, we’ve performed lab and pilot scale testing of various technologies important to our industry including absorption of light hydrocarbons from atmospheric emissions, separation of light hydrocarbons, capture of H2S from vapor and aqueous phase sources and absorption of contaminates in waste waters. This presentation will review the developments of this new material science for the absorption and reuse of captured VOCs from otherwise atmospheric emissions. We will review our current progress as part of our current EPA SBIR Grant, focused on absorption of light VOCs not easily managed with Activated Carbon. "

Date

Thursday

Time

1:30PM

Location

Room 417B

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Chemical

New Flare Requirements within the Ethylene, MON, and OLD MACTs

Herman Holm - Spectrum Environmental Solutions, LLC

Description

Regulations requiring improved monitoring and control of flares at petroleum refineries are starting to be passed along to other manufacturing sectors. In October 2019, the U.S. EPA proposed amendments to the Generic Maximum Achievable Control Technology Standards for Ethylene Production (EMACT). Among those amendments are new monitoring and operational requirements related to flares at ethylene production facilities. Also, in recent months, the U.S. EPA has published draft rules affecting organic liquid distribution (OLD) operations and portions of the chemical sector. These requirements are found in what are commonly referred to as the OLD MACT and Miscellaneous Organic NESHAP (MON). This presentation will summarize the new flare requirements and will draw heavily on the lessons learned from implementing the similar flare requirements in the refining sector.

Date

Thursday

Time

10:30AM

Location

Room 406

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Best Management Practices

Utilizing Vapor Lock Technology for Tank Degassing and Tank Vent Management versus Thermal Destruction or Activated Carbon

Jim Woodard, Jeff St. Amant - Vapor Point, LLC

Description

State and Local Agency actions have added emphasis to the management of emissions from large API 650 storage tanks, as a result of regulatory action and/or public engagement. In the US most API 650 storage tanks, which are in a service where there is a potential for VOC emissions, have been outfitted with internal floating roofs, which are considered by the EPA as BACT. Historically, tank owners have had requirements for controlling emissions from tanks when existing tank attachments have malfunctioned, or when the tank is being prepared for maintenance activities. Thermal destruction devices are the most commonly used control technologies for managing tank emissions, but they may not be the most efficient or effective. This presentation will review the development of a new Vapor Lock technology for the management of tank emissions during degassing and cleaning operations, demonstrating improved operational performance, while reducing cost impacts to clients.

Date

Thursday

Time

2:00PM

Location

Room 417A

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Chemical

Intro to EMACT, OLD, HON, and MON Compliance Gases- Take-aways from RSR Experience

Andy Shurtleff - Airgas

Description

Safety Councils work for petrochemical plants and their contractors to facilitate innovative ways to reduce incident rates resulting in a 95% reduction in recordable accidents. 2018 marked an evolution in deliverables, slowly migrating away from training to develop new workforce compliance and risk management processes. Working within the industry we developed several internationally recognized Best Practices for contractor compliance, risk management, labor cost management. The petrochemical industry consortium, ISTC, made up of downstream and midstream operators, collaborated with contractors bringing years of quantitative data to identify problems that are developing or have occurred in the workplace and formulating solutions, cost structures and most importantly compliance management to combat future issues. The presentation, outlines several of the best practices in contractor compliance and provides insight toward the direction of future efforts associated with hiring, compliance, auditing, accident response and even Department of Homeland Security, CFATS inspections. Specific industry incidents and actual cases are highlighted to demonstrate the reasoning behind the emerging trends and seeks input from audience members on the potential impact to their business operations. Recently adopted across a variety of global operational excellence teams, Emerging Trends in Workforce Compliance is designed to serve as a barometer of future downstream, and midstream compliance requirements.

Date

Thursday

Time

2:00PM

Location

Room 416A

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February 20th

Utilizing Temporary Control Systems to Meet Recent EPA MACT Subpart CC and to Eliminate Flare Gas Recovery Bottlenecks During Maintenance and Turn-Around Activities

Jim Woodard, Sean Kirkpatrick - Vapor Point, LLC

Description

The implementation of Refinery RTR is creating significant concern to operations, in how they approach equipment deinventory. New MACT standards restricts refiners’ ability to openly purge process equipment to the atmosphere, eliminating the SSM exemption, while placing significant constraints on when units can be opened to the atmosphere. This has resulted in FGR becoming a bottleneck to operators’ ability to deinventory and decontaminate units for maintenance activities, resulting in additional costs in meeting these new standards. Vapor Point has successfully implemented temporary liquid and vapor phase management systems to minimize these impacts, helping operators maintain schedule while reducing cost impacts. This paper/presentation will be focused on how the deployment of mobile technologies can help operators reduce and potentially improve operational execution/efficiency, if implemented correctly.

Date

Thursday

Time

3:30PM

Location

Room 417A

Register Now →

CEMS

Ethylene Oxide CEMS

Steve Hall - Spectrum Environmental Solutions, LLC

Description

Reducing emissions of ethylene oxide has recently become a focus of U.S. EPA following revised risk assessments for the compound. On November 11, 2019, the U.S. EPA released a pre-publication version of proposed amendments to the Miscellaneous Organic NESHAP (MON). The MON amendments include new monitoring and testing requirements for control devices used to control ethylene oxide emissions. Part of these new requirements include continuous monitoring of ethylene oxide concentrations using Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) Continuous Emissions Monitoring System (CEMS) for control devices other than a flare. This presentation will describe how FTIR can be used to monitor ethylene oxide and elaborate on the continuous ethylene oxide monitoring requirements found in the MON.

Date

Thursday

Time

12:00PM

Location

Room 416A

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Chemical

Digital Camera Visible Emissions Method (Alternative Method 082) in lieu of Method 9 for Visible Emissions

Shawn Dolan - Virtual Technology, LLC

Description

ASTM D7520-16 and US EPA Alternative Method 082, have revolutionized Visible Emission Management practices over the last 7 years. Community Air Quality Awareness has become a litigation boiling pot, as smart phones, and low cost Particulate and Ozone monitors, have flooded the monitoring markets, making monitoring readily available to everybody everywhere. The exponential growth of the community monitoring market over the last two years will be reviewed and strategies to embrace community monitoring as a means of compliance assurance will be discussed in this presentation.

Date

Thursday

Time

2:00PM

Location

Room 417B

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Best Management Practices

Conforming to ASTM-D7036: Self-Declaration vs. Third-Party Accreditation

David Fricker - A2LA

Description

Confidence in test data is paramount to acceptance, and both users and customers want assurance of quality. In general, testing bodies that choose accreditation rather than self-declaration demand a higher quality of work to maintain that accreditation and strive to produce more reliable results. In turn, customers have greater confidence in the accuracy and validity of the data from these testing bodies. Accreditation also provides the industry with confidence that a testing body is subject to regular oversight as a motivator to continually improve their operations. The ongoing verification of compliance ensures that the testing body’s results are consistently dependable and defensible.

Date

Thursday

Time

2:30PM

Location

Room 417A

Register Now →

CEMS

Live Demo: Improving Sample Probe, Chiller, and Filter Performance

Donny Klotz - M&C TechGroup North America

Description

Live demonstration to teach the audience about the many ways in which various Continuous Emissions Monitoring System components can be improved, optimized and properly specified for various applications. We'll discuss sample transport and conditioning considerations associated with extractive probe configurations, gas chiller options, filtration materials and temperature controls, and help end-users identify and overcome common CEMS challenges.

Date

Thursday

Time

10:30AM

Location

Room 404

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Chemical

“Hot Mic” Flare Panel – Moderated by Extrel and Spectrum Environmental Solutions

Multiple -

Description

An interactive panel focusing on regulatory compliance for flares.

Date

Thursday

Time

4:00PM

Location

Room 408

Register Now →

BWON

BWON Compliance Sampling

Chad Vogele - Think Environmental

Description

Description coming soon.

Date

Thursday

Time

1:30PM

Location

Room 402

Register Now →

Best Management Practices

I got 99 problems… now what? Best Practices for Addressing Audit Findings

Courtney Edge - Trinity Consultants

Description

Conducting a gap assessment or audit is a great starting point for getting your LDAR program into compliance – but that’s only the first of many steps. After findings, observations, and recommendations are identified, corrective actions must be developed and prioritized appropriately. Depending on the scope and number of identified issues, this can be a daunting task but there are ways to manage the stress and work load accordingly. This presentation will cover what to do after the completion of an audit or gap assessment of your LDAR program.

Date

Thursday

Time

1:30PM

Location

Room 417A

Register Now →

February 20th

EPA’s New Accident Prevention Program Implementation and Other Regulatory Reforms to Expect Before the Election

Shannon Broome - Hunton, Andrews, Kurth

Description

One of the hallmarks of the Trump Administration’s regulatory reform efforts has been its partial reversal and reconsideration of the US EPA’s chemical accident prevention provisions, which were finalized in December 2019. EPA has also recently reformed several aspects of Clean Air Act permitting that are vitally important to petroleum, chemical, and other manufacturing companies. What does the future hold for these reforms and how have they delivered on the promise of a win/win situation for the regulated community and environmental benefits?

Date

Thursday

Time

8:30AM

Location

Room 6th Floor Ballroom

Register Now →

Chemical

CFATS 101 Panel Discussion

Steven Shedd, Shawn Perceful, Ann Ratliff - Department of Homeland Security

Description

CFATS 101 - CFATS is the Nation’s first regulatory program focused specifically on security at high-risk chemical facilities. The Cybersecurity and Infrastructure Security Agency (CISA) manages the CFATS program by working with facilities to ensure they have security measures in place to reduce the risks associated with certain hazardous chemicals, and prevent them from being exploited in a terrorist attack

Date

Thursday

Time

4:00PM

Location

Room 615

Register Now →

Chemical

RTR Update

Steve Smith - LyondellBassell

Description

EPA is proposing multiple Risk and Technology (RTR) rules in 2019 that will affect the chemical and petrochemical industries, including the National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAP) for Miscellaneous Organic Chemical Manufacturing (MON), Organic Liquids Distribution (OLD), Ethylene Production, and Stationary Combustion Turbines. This presentation will review changes EPA is proposing to make to various NESHAP as a result of their risk reviews, technology reviews, or in response to past court decisions. These changes affect startup and shutdown, stringency of the standards, maintenance procedures, monitoring, and reporting. We will highlight proposed changes that are similar to the Refinery Sector Rule, changes that increase stringency of standards for ethylene oxide emission sources, and where various chemical and petrochemical sector rules will now have slightly different requirements. The presentation will also discuss industry comments submitted to EPA on the major proposed changes.

Date

Thursday

Time

11:00AM

Location

Room 416A

Register Now →

Chemical

Vista Analytical Lab

Martha Maier - Vista Analytical Labs

Description

Coming soon.

Date

Thursday

Time

1:30PM

Location

Room 416A

Register Now →

Chemical

Combustion Turbines: Regulatory and Analyzer Update for EPA’s New Formaldehyde Emissions Limit

Troy Boley - Spectrum Environmental Solutions, LLC

Description

Recent Spectrum laboratory results using only the standard MCT detector have yielded the conclusion that a 5 m cell could NOT provide low enough detection to meet the EPA reporting limit (data concentration >= 3X standard deviation of data collection). However, all of FTIR manufacturer B systems are 5 m cell systems and further, Manufacturer B does not have the option for using an alternative detector. Spectrum provided a 10 and 29 m cell, and data indicates no difficulty meeting a reporting limit below the regulatory threshold, even below ~15 ppbvd concentrations. Recent data resulting from the alternative detector on FTIR A devices pushed the standard deviation low enough that Spectrum could detect and report data < 27 ppb (at <3*S.D.) in a small 5 m cell. With this short cell, Spectrum demonstrated detection of formaldehyde concentrations of 12 ppbvd with a SD of 4 ppb. This early data set was taken at 3-minute time averages. Future studies will be increased to 5-minute averaging that should take the 0.004 SD to sqrt(3/5)*0.004 = 0.003 ppb. Future field validations may be performed with EPRI to demonstrate even lower detection limits using Spectrum’s standard 10 m cell and its new detector arrangement. Spectrum anticipates these future results to demonstrate a DL less than 5 ppbvd, and these results will be shared shortly.

Date

Thursday

Time

2:30PM

Location

Room 416A

Register Now →

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