2018 Presentations - 4C Conference



2018 Breakout Presentations

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On April 3, 2018, hundreds of environmental professionals gathered to attend
breakout presentation sessions covering cover tons of health, safety, and environmental topics.

The presentations given at the 2018 conference have been compiled and made available for download. Check the list of presentations below to download the presentations you were most interested in.


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Download 2018 Presentations by Track

Click the buttons below to download presentations by track, or download the entire collection of 2018 breakout presentations.

“4G” Combustion Technology for Flares

Jason Voskuhl & Kurt Kraus - , Honeywell UOP Callidus

Description

As flare regulations tighten there has been increased emphasis on monitoring and controlling flaring. While there have been advances in steam control systems and plume monitoring systems there has not been a fundamental change in flare combustion technology for decades. This presentation introduces “4G” combustion technology which changes the paradigm of currently available “3G” flare combustion technology, and sets the bar for the next generation of flare design.

“4G” Combustion Technology for Flares

Jason Voskuhl & Kurt Kraus - , Honeywell UOP Callidus

Description

As flare regulations tighten there has been increased emphasis on monitoring and controlling flaring. While there have been advances in steam control systems and plume monitoring systems there has not been a fundamental change in flare combustion technology for decades. This presentation introduces “4G” combustion technology which changes the paradigm of currently available “3G” flare combustion technology, and sets the bar for the next generation of flare design.

“Hot Mic” Flare Panel – Moderated by Extrel and Spectrum Environmental Solutions

Description

An interactive panel focusing on regulatory compliance for flares.

“Hot Mic” Flare Panel – Moderated by Extrel and Spectrum Environmental Solutions

Multiple Speakers - , Extrel and Spectrum Environmental Solutions

Description

Flare hot-topics discussed by multiple industry vendors.

A New Era of LDAR in Texas: Industries Can Now Use OGI in Lieu of Method 21 to Meet “28” Series LDAR Requirements

Brandon Morgan - , Tora Consulting

Description

Last year, Tora Consulting, LLC (Tora) obtained the first ever approval in Texas for the use of optical gas imaging (OGI) technology as an alternative to the Method 21 monitoring requirements of TCEQ’s “28” series boilerplate leak detection and repair (LDAR) programs (e.g., 28MID, 28VHP, etc.). The approval was a milestone, paving the way for others in Texas to implement a more efficient, effective, and economical OGI-based LDAR program. The presentation will discuss Tora’s approach for negotiating the approval, summarize the OGI-based LDAR program, and provide an overview of important permitting considerations for those interested in making the change.

A New Way to Measure Toxic Gases with Wireless and IIoT

Josh Hernandez - , Emerson Automation Solutions

Description

Toxic gases remain in the top issues facing the oil and gas industry from a safety perspective. Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) gas, Carbon Monoxide (CO), and Oxygen depletion (O2) are among the most common hazards in the process industries. The gases are extremely toxic and dangerous to personnel who work in these areas. These gases can accumulate in any area where oil or natural gas is processed, stored, or transported. Many cases of people sickened or killed by toxic or harmful fumes are reported throughout the world. Emerson provides a solution to keep end users safe with wireless technology

A Practitioner’s Guide to PFAS – Lessons learned and best practices to ensure project efficiency and desired outcomes

Tiffany Thomas - Senior Project Manager/Chief Chemist, EnSafe

Description

Coming soon.

A Wastewater Solution for an Air Pollution Problem

Todd Lusk - Senior Engineer, SLR Consulting

Description

The regulatory requirements for managing benzene- and VOC-laden streams from wastewater treatment units require refineries to implement vapor control technologies that are often expensive to implement and/or operate. This session presents another option – the VOC BioTreatTM process, an alternative control technology that utilizes unit operations already in place at most wastewater treatment facilities and can substantially reduce the costs associated with BWON compliance. The presentation will provide information on the necessary steps to evaluate, model, test, and implement the VOC BioTreatTM process, and will describe case studies to support the economic and environmental benefits.

Achieve SCR Level NOx Performance with ClearSign Core Burners

Stephen Sock - , ClearSign Combustion Corporation

Acoustic Condensate Stabilization

Stephen Saint Vincent - CTO/Member, Saint & Tiller Technologies

Description

Acoustic Condensate Stabilization is a novel technique that is proving to be highly effective and efficient. The stabilization process is driven by dynamic pressure of an acoustic field, causing mass transport of high volatile species into gas phase. The process is non thermal, making it a much safer alternative. The overall process equipment is much simpler and less costly to operate.

Advanced Technology for Real Time Fence-Line Perimeter Monitoring

Gilad Shpitzer - , Atmosfir Optics Ltd.

Description

Atmosfir Optics, Ltd., will present the D-fenceline System, an advanced software application, applied to classical FTIR, Open Path Technology, providing significant and unique improvement to remote sensing of fence-line boundaries. We will discuss how these unique algorithms have been applied in the field to drive detection limits down an order of magnitude, pinpoint emission sources with an advanced triangulation algorithm, and increase confidence in using real time data for rapid mitigation and alerts, with instantaneous, real time spectral validation against the NIST reference spectra.

Advances in Airborne Gas Leak Detection

Peter Roos - , Bridger Photonics

Description

This presentation will describe, in simple terms, the three types of airborne gas leak detection solutions. The presentation will then highlight how recent technology advances are reducing operational leak monitoring costs by 60% to 90%. The presentation will answer the questions “What is Gas Mapping LiDAR”.

Advantages of Hot-Filter Cooled OGI technology for Leak Detection and Quantification

Ram Hashmonay - , Opgal

Description

The ability to manually replace or automatically swap filters in an OGI camera provide many advantages for various OGI applications. This presentation reviews several OGI applications, where swapping the filter provides better detection sensitivity, longer range, compounds' classification, and more accurate quantification.

AFPM Security – UAS Toolkit, Regulatory Advocacy Updates

Air Quality Tools for the 21st Century

Robert Opiela - CEO/Co-Founder, NaviKnow

Description

The air quality permitting process is a data-driven process. Federal permit applicability (do you trigger PSD?), netting calculations, rule applicability, emission calculations, etc. require input data. A permit application cannot be prepared or reviewed without access to the necessary information required by the rules and regulations. Finding, retrieving, and manipulating the dozens of available data sets adds days, even weeks to the processes to prepare and review the permit application. Do you really want to expedite the air quality permit process? NaviKnow Solutions has developed 21st century tools where you can easily locate, access, and download the information needed to complete or review air quality permit applications ALL in one location. We have also developed tools to significantly automate the application review. See how a significant amount of time can be shaved off the air quality permit application process without having to pay for an "expedited" permit application review.

Alternative Work Practice: How Revisions May Affect Refineries

Karen Marsh - , US EPA

Description

On December 22, 2008, EPA published a voluntary alternative work practice for LDAR using optical gas imaging. Since promulgation, advancements have been made in leak detection technologies that warrant examination of revisions to the alternative work practice. EPA plans to propose revisions to the alternative work practice in 2020 which may impact how refineries would implement the alternative. This presentation will discuss key questions, related to refineries, that EPA is considering during development of this proposal.

An Operator's Perspective: In-House Tools and UAS for Initial Response (Inland Pipeline Response)

John Wickersham - , Colonial Pipeline

Applications and Field Results for Quantitative Optical Gas Imaging

Jon Morris - , Providence Photonics

Description

Optical Gas Imaging (OGI) is gaining traction as the best available Leak Detection and Repair technology(LDAR) for the detection of fugitive emissions. The NSPS OOOOa regulations, for the first time, have allowed for OGI as the primary LDAR technology. In addition, the emerging field of Quantitative Optical Gas imaging (QOGI) has opened up new applications and new possibilities for OGI. A recent QOGI method which allows operators to determine emission rates using a handheld optical gas imager. The technology has been tested and validated through various field studies and independent testing.This presentation will discuss applications and field testing results for QOGI in the upstream oil and gas industry. QOGI results are compared to known release rates and other quantitative methods. Applications for QOGI in both upstream and downstream oil and gas and petrochemical industries. Comparisons are made between available quantification technologies in the context of Leak Detection and Repair.

Are You Ready? Contingency Planning for the RMP Amendments and Litigation

Justin Savage, Simone Jones - , Sidley Austin, LLP

Description

The RMP Amendments impose several burdensome obligations, including reporting up to the Board of Directors. EPA’s attempt to repeal or narrow the amendments will likely be tied up in litigation in the DC Circuit, but in the meantime, compliance deadlines are soon approaching. In the midst of this uncertainty, this session will discuss the DC Circuit litigation, enforcement trends, and planning for the amendments.

Assessing the Human Health Risks to Fugitive Airborne Ethylene Oxide Emissions

Benjamin Chandler - , GHD Services

Description

A recent study by the US EPA Integrated Risk Information System indicated and increased carcinogenic potential for community exposures to airborne Ethylene oxide (EtO) around facilities using EtO. The resulting changes to the EtO risk criteria by the US EPA have increased public scrutiny for EtO users to reduce emissions and ensure healthy conditions within neighboring communities. This presentation will focus on strategies for measuring ambient levels of EtO in outside air for the purpose of determining potential human health risks. Integrated air sampling methodologies will be discussed along with predictive air dispersion modeling capabilities and emission control solutions. A brief history of the EPA rule changes for Texas will also be presented as the basis for regulatory compliance.

Auditing in the New Decade: Creating Value by Reducing Environmental Liabilities and Risks

Tim Wilkins & Eric Hodek - , Bracewell LLP & Ramboll

Description

Environmental liabilities pose significant risks in mergers, acquisitions, and ongoing concerns. Our presenters will discuss practical strategies for stakeholders, owners, or operators to leverage audit protections to strengthen their financial position.

Autonomous Mobile Methane Monitoring

Brendan Smith - , SeekOps

Description

Current emissions monitoring techniques and technologies are unable to meet growing demands for FME inspections in a cost-effective or efficient manner. SeekOps enables responsible energy production through rapid, efficient, and cost-effective FME monitoring.

Autonomous Real-Time VOC Analyzer & Passive Fenceline Tubes – Data Comparison of New Technology to Method 325

Jason Robles - President, CAMSCO

Description

In accordance with Method 325, passive sorbent tubes are currently deployed and continuously sampling at refineries across the US & Canada. The method is also applied in a number of new applications including the Proposed Organic Liquids Distribution (OLD) rule, Consent Decrees, State Enforcement & Community Monitoring. With the popularity Method 325 is gaining, and the need to investigate elevated readings, there is a growing demand for real-time data. Camsco conducted a study comparing data generated from one of the latest real-time VOC analyzers and passive tubes. In this presentation, we will review comparison study results and discuss steps taken to bridge the gap between the analyzers real-time data & passive tubes analyzed via TD/GC/MS.

Autonomous Security Programs: Building Autonomous Infrastructure and Use Cases for Automation

Description

The Crawl, Walk, Run progression from zero to Autonomous UAVs flying around your facility: People Training and Certifications Programs Assigning Roles and Responsibilities Policy Interfacing with the FAA Use Case for Automation An introduction into Autonomous Security Design, and the potential Environmental benefits of Autonomous Infrastructure. Use Cases to be discussed are as follows: Security Emergency Management Environmental Industrial Hygiene and Liability Mitigation

Avitas - LUMEN Sky - Aerial Drone-based Digital Methane Monitoring

Myalee Muller - Global Product Line Leader, Baker Hughes

Description

Launched in 2017, Avitas Systems is a Baker Hughes company focused on improving safety, protecting the environment, reducing asset downtime and decreasing overall inspection time and cost over traditional manual methods. To do so, Avitas Systems uses automated robotics and its suite of Artificial Intelligence software to accelerate inspections and provide applied intelligence to its customers, so that they can act on it rapidly, by accessing Avitas’s SaaS platform and optimizing their maintenance & repairs plans. In the Permian, Avitas Systems uses drones to accelerate such well sites inspections data gathering, then processes images and videos with its AI-based Computer Vision algorithm to create useful risk-based reports to Oil & Gas operators. Our goal is to inspect hundreds of Permian well sites in one day, and report to each operators the next morning for their 7 am operation meeting, so they can not only better plan and prioritize their daily routes, but also take the necessary parts and tools required to maintain or repair identified equipment issues or failure. Some of the critical inspection points are liquid or gas leaks, such as Fugitive Methane Emissions (“FME”), flares status and efficiency, advanced corrosion damage, overall equipment status (heaters, separators, scrubbers, pumps), tank volumetric, hazardous material, proper signage, solar panel position and overall well site operating conditions.

Avoiding Under-Reporting and Over-Reporting of Fenceline Plant Emissions

James Shinkle - , Optical Scientific

Description

Using a point measurement wind sensor for fenceline applications will result in under or over-estimating large body wind movement from your plant. OSI’s Long-baseline Optical Anemometer provides path-averaged wind data to give you an honest and accurate picture of plant emissions and can be a valuable tool in the case of an accidental release.

Back from the Future

Description

MarkWest migrated away from the AWP for LDAR compliance monitoring. We left where everyone is trying to go and reverted back to M21 monitoring for our LDAR programs. Will have some stats and such to show the difference in leak % with OGI vs M21.

Barr will demonstrate its free Microsoft Excel spreadsheet tools for storage tank emissions, LDAR program review and compliance reporting, and MACT CC flare NHVcz standards

Corey Mead - , Barr Engineering

Description

Description coming soon

Benzene Fence-line Emissions at Refineries: What Legal Standard Applies?

Description

With refinery fence-line data now publicly available, EPA, states and private parties appear to be aggressively mining the data to determine whether any concerns exist. In particular, EPA appears to be taking the position that 9 mg/yr standard is only the starting point for analysis and that other agencies’ legal standards should inform risk and compliance. What standard should refineries aim to hit with benzene emissions?

Boiler and Process Heater Tuning as a Best Management Practice

John Bacon - , TRC Consulting

Description

While most facilities perceive 40 CFR 63 Subpart DDDDD (Boiler and Heater MACT, or MACT DDDDD) as costly regulation, four years of data compiled from the annually and biennially recurring tune-ups indicates the opposite is true. In fact, regular boiler and process heater tuning for natural gas fired sources can lead to considerable cost savings related to fuel use and a simple payback on the tune-ups services within months. The purpose of this presentation is intended to enlighten the audience on the benefits of boiler and process heater tuning, using data compiled from tune-ups performed on nearly 600 combustion sources, and conducted in accordance with the Boiler MACT work practice standard. Also, how a facility can further benefit from the regular performance of these services beyond the regulatory framework.

BWON Auditing

Bart Leininger - Principal, Ashworth Leininger Group

Description

The National Emission Standard for Benzene Waste Operations (BWON or Subpart FF) is a complex regulation that is difficult to assess in the context of a due diligence assessment. These assessments are conducted within compressed schedules, essential documentation is typically limited or unavailable, and the liabilities for non-compliance are significant. Given the complexity of the BWON regulation, even a seasoned practitioner can miss a significant compliance issue, which could result in a costly corrective actions and potential enforcement exposure for a new owner. Further complicating the due diligence are Subpart FF enhanced requirements mandated in Consent Decrees. Assessing compliance with these enhanced requirements is just as important as compliance with the regulation itself. Given this complex backdrop, Subpart FF assessment during a due diligence must have a laser focus on those requirements of most importance for the acquisition. This presentation draws upon the presenter’s experience in performing detailed Subpart FF assessments in the context of a due diligence and from litigation related to BWON compliance. The presentation uses case study examples to illustrate key areas of inquiry that should be part of the assessment, and provides helpful and practical recommendations for evaluating key aspects of a Subpart FF compliance program. This presentation will also be of interest to BWON professionals with ongoing operations as it provides a “mental checklist” of areas of potential exposure in their BWON compliance program.

BWON Compliance Post-Consent Decree Era

Kati Petersburg - Principal Consultant, Trinity Consultants

Description

The refinery Consent Decrees added “enhanced provisions” to the BWON. Refineries complied by doing more than the BWON citations required, with the enhanced provisions sometimes dominating compliance demonstration. So what will happen as the Consent Decrees are terminated? Will all those enhanced provisions become a thing of the past? Or will it perhaps be advisable to retain some of them with as much attention as ever? The speaker brings decades of BWON compliance experience to a strategic analysis of what to do in the post-CD era.

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BWON Compliance Sampling

Chad Vogele - , Think Environmental

Description

Description coming soon.

BWON Masterclass

Steve Probst - CEO/Founder, 4C Marketplace and Conference

Description

Coming soon.

Calculating Project Increases

Johnny Vermillion - Program Manager, Air Quality, Spirit Environmental

Description

Do you find Major New Source Review applicability confusing? Have you noticed that even the initial step of trying to figure out project increases (much less the rest of the program) already starts to descend into a confusing mess? When it comes to calculating project increases these days, the “devil is in the details”. This presentation will provide background and suggested approaches on the new the EPA guidelines along with insight on some states’ decision on implementation.

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California Rule 1180 Fence Line Monitoring Regulation: Lessons Learned and planning for Regulatory Compliance

Gilad Shpitzer - , Atmosfir Optics Ltd.

Description

Atmosfir Optics, Ltd, will discuss California’s South Coast’s Air Quality Measurement Division’s Rule 1180 fence-line monitoring requirements, how they came into existence, where they protect public health, and where there are inconsistencies as applied to known risk levels. We will discuss cost effective ways to apply advanced technology that can quickly adapt to potential upcoming requirements from other regulators that may use this rule as a model. Lessons learned from supporting a refinery’s response will be presented.

CFATS 101 Panel Discussion

Steven Shedd, Shawn Perceful, Ann Ratliff - , Department of Homeland Security

Description

CFATS 101 - CFATS is the Nation’s first regulatory program focused specifically on security at high-risk chemical facilities. The Cybersecurity and Infrastructure Security Agency (CISA) manages the CFATS program by working with facilities to ensure they have security measures in place to reduce the risks associated with certain hazardous chemicals, and prevent them from being exploited in a terrorist attack

Closed Loop Flare Operations and Remote Measurement of Flare Gas Flow Rate

Yousheng Zeng - , Providence Photonics

Description

A Video Imaging Spectral Radiometry (VISR) device is integrated into a flare control system to automatically adjust steam assist based on the smoke level of the flare. The VISR device is also used to remotely measure flare gas flow rate. The results of these new features and applications will be presented.

Combustion Turbines: Regulatory and Analyzer Update for EPA’s New Formaldehyde Emissions Limit

Troy Boley - , Spectrum Environmental Solutions, LLC

Description

Recent Spectrum laboratory results using only the standard MCT detector have yielded the conclusion that a 5 m cell could NOT provide low enough detection to meet the EPA reporting limit (data concentration >= 3X standard deviation of data collection). However, all of FTIR manufacturer B systems are 5 m cell systems and further, Manufacturer B does not have the option for using an alternative detector. Spectrum provided a 10 and 29 m cell, and data indicates no difficulty meeting a reporting limit below the regulatory threshold, even below ~15 ppbvd concentrations. Recent data resulting from the alternative detector on FTIR A devices pushed the standard deviation low enough that Spectrum could detect and report data < 27 ppb (at <3*S.D.) in a small 5 m cell. With this short cell, Spectrum demonstrated detection of formaldehyde concentrations of 12 ppbvd with a SD of 4 ppb. This early data set was taken at 3-minute time averages. Future studies will be increased to 5-minute averaging that should take the 0.004 SD to sqrt(3/5)*0.004 = 0.003 ppb. Future field validations may be performed with EPRI to demonstrate even lower detection limits using Spectrum’s standard 10 m cell and its new detector arrangement. Spectrum anticipates these future results to demonstrate a DL less than 5 ppbvd, and these results will be shared shortly.

Common CEMS Program Audit Findings

Eric Wiley - , VIM Technologies

Description

Issues of non-compliance and poor system performance are frequently discovered during CEMS program audits. The presentation will also focus on best practice implementation that can assist facilities in ensuring that their CEMS programs are compliant with applicable regulatory requirements and help utilize limited resources as efficiently as possible. Real world examples of CEMS audit findings will be outlined and ways to avoid such issues will be discussed.

Common CEMS RATA Failures and Risks

Paula Metz - Technical Services Assistant Manager, Alliance Source Testing

Description

This presentation will focus on thing that may cause a CEMS RATA to fail and what can be done on the facility side and by the stack tester to reduce the potential for failures.

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Community Outreach in Emergency Response

CISA Region 6 - , DHS CISA Region 6

Description

Description coming soon.

Comprehensive CEMS Stack 102: Process Optimization

Dean Kotecki - , Envea

Description

Continuous monitoring instruments for bag–house filter performance control, bag leak detectors, flue gas & solid flow moisture monitoring, level detection, reagent injection control, etc. allowing the optimization of your processes: raw material & energy savings, reduction of environmental impacts.

Conducting a Threat Assessment of Your Facility’s Airspace

Uzkar Ibrahim - VP of Business Development, Sage EHS International, 4C Marketplace

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Conforming to ASTM-D7036: Self-Declaration vs. Third-Party Accreditation

David Fricker - Life Sciences Accreditation Officer II, A2LA

Description

Confidence in test data is paramount to acceptance, and both users and customers want assurance of quality. In general, testing bodies that choose accreditation rather than self-declaration demand a higher quality of work to maintain that accreditation and strive to produce more reliable results. In turn, customers have greater confidence in the accuracy and validity of the data from these testing bodies. Accreditation also provides the industry with confidence that a testing body is subject to regular oversight as a motivator to continually improve their operations. The ongoing verification of compliance ensures that the testing body’s results are consistently dependable and defensible.

Converting Your Emissions to Electricity and More

Mark Lancaster - , Baker Hughes

Description

Baker Hughes is at the forefront of the next wave of smart and efficient energy technologies that help operators discover and produce oil and gas. Technology enabling the electrification of surface facilities and pressure pumping equipment offering significant potential for operational and efficiency gains.

Counter UAS Strategies: Prevention, Detection, Reponse

Description

A roundtable giving an overview of Counter UAS, Regulatory Framework, Presentation/Response Planning and a Primer on Radar and Radio Frequency Detection Systems Strategies Counter UAS Discussion An introduction into what Counter UAS means, the different components of it as well as the difference between detection and mitigation Prevention: Doing a Threat Assessment of your Facility’s Airspace Detection: Various Systems and how to use them Observation Without Limits An introduction in Ground and Aerial Radars Aerial Armor and the Benefits An introduction in RF Based Detection

Crisis Response vs. Incident Management

Scott McHugh - , LyondellBassell

Cybersecurity – Protecting Critical Infrastructure

George Reeves - , DHS CISA Region 6

Description

Cyber threats collectively now exceed the danger of physical attacks against us. This is a major sea change for my department and for our country’s security.

Detecting Natural Pipeline Threats and Changes Using Satellite Data

Sean Donegan - , Satelytics

Description

Coming soon.

Detection Limits for Optical Gas Imaging

Jon Morris - CTO, Providence Photonics

Description

Optical Gas Imaging (OGI) is an effective tool for equipment leak detection. Despite the fact that OGI has been used for leak detection for over a decade, its detection limit is an elusive performance metric. There is a persistent tendency to compare the OGI detection limit to the leak definition in the Leak Detection And Repair (LDAR) programs (e.g., 10,000 ppm, 2,000 ppm, 500 ppm, etc.). A substantial body of research has been performed that has shed some light on the OGI detection limits, the factors that dictate the detection limits, and the relationship between the OGI detection limits and the LDAR leak definition. These findings should help better define the capabilities and limitations of OGI as a leak detection method, and advance the OGI technology to the next level of adoption as a primary leak detection method.

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Developing Unified Command

CISA Region 6 - , DHS CISA Region 6

Description

Description coming soon.

Development of a Wall-Sticking Drone for Non-Destructive Ultrasonic and Corrosion Testing

Rami Mattar - NPD Director , AMERAPEX CORPORATION

Description

Refinery structures require frequent inspection, maintenance to maintain structural health, and safe work practices; however, accessing structures is getting harder and harder due to their enormous height and size. In order to deal with this problem, many researchers have developed several robots for wall crawling, yet there is much progress beyond this that is needed. One of the primary reasons that existing wall crawling robots haven’t been used more widely in the field are risks associated with accidental fall of the equipment due to operational failure from the harsh environment like strong winds and the unpredictability of rough surface conditions. Therefore, we tried to develop a wall-sticking aerial robot platform that can approach any area on the structure by flying to and sticking on the target. The robot is equipped with electro-magnetic hold/mount elements to “stick” the sensor probe on the ferro-magnetic surface of the structure. This paper covers installing the wall-sticking mechanism on the aerial robot.

Development of an Elevated Flare Tip to Ease 40 CFR 63.670 Compliance

Matt Martin - Senior Product Line Manager , Callidus-Honeywell

Description

The new flare related provisions in 40 CFR 63.670 and the potential for increased enforcement give rise to the opportunity for new technology to ease compliance for operators. The impetus and results from a research and development program for a new high efficiency elevated flare tip is presented. Realistic industrial scale testing was used to validate the flare design.

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DHS CISA Stakeholder Engagement Strategy – Regional Service Delivery Model

Michael Dailey - , Department of Homeland Security

Description

Regional Offices could identify organizations that have not traditionally served as members of CISA-led sectors to further inform risk mitigation solutions by focusing on sector-specific regional issues. The resulting regional-level networks would directly expand CISA's reach into multiple stakeholder segments. Creating a “one-stop shop” at the regional level for issues associated with CISA-led sectors would significantly enhance customer experience. Regional-level collaboration mechanisms (discussion forums, roundtables, and workshops) would enhance knowledge transfer among public and private sector stakeholders through discussions tailored to the regional landscape.

Difficult CEMS Applications at Refineries and Chemical Plants

Tim Kuiken - National Sales Manager, M&C TechGroup

Description

Coming soon.

Digital Camera Visible Emissions Method (Alternative Method 082) in lieu of Method 9 for Visible Emissions

Shawn Dolan - President, Virtual Technology, LLC

Description

ASTM D7520-16 and US EPA Alternative Method 082, have revolutionized Visible Emission Management practices over the last 7 years. Community Air Quality Awareness has become a litigation boiling pot, as smart phones, and low cost Particulate and Ozone monitors, have flooded the monitoring markets, making monitoring readily available to everybody everywhere. The exponential growth of the community monitoring market over the last two years will be reviewed and strategies to embrace community monitoring as a means of compliance assurance will be discussed in this presentation.

Digital Transformation in the HSE World

Steve Probst - , 4C Conference and Marketplace

Description

What is digital transformation? Digital transformation allows the use of data on a daily basis to reduce emissions, improve safety, reduce cost and increase mechanical availability. An everyday example is tire pressure. 5 years ago we checked the air pressure in our tires once a month. Now there is a tire pressure indicator that displays the pressure of each tire when we start the car. Properly inflated tires increase gas mileage (reduce cost and reduce emissions), have fewer blow-outs (improve safety) and increase the life of the tire (increase mechanical availability). Similarly, flare flow was not measured 5 to 10 years ago. Most facilities now measure the flow, concentration, supplemental fuel and steam (or air for air assisted flares). This results in operators scrambling to find the source of flow when the measured flow or concentration goes outside a constraint (sulfur, Btu, opacity, etc.). The digital transformation for flares is the use of Emerson’s non-intrusive transmitter based flow detection enabled with Mesh Technology, Score Valves Midas meters (surveys and installations), BH FLareIQ, and Extrel’s Mass Spectrometry to identify in real time the source and impact of flare flow, composition and control. These technologies constitute the digital transformation of flare operation. The identification of the source of the gas on a real time basis is the manifestation of the digital transformation to reduce cost, reduce emissions, improve safety and increase mechanical availability. The oil and gas industry faces a similar digital transformation in the coming years. Satellites will detect emissions each day. Annual, Semi-annual or Quarterly monitoring of valves, pumps, and flanges do not produce the same result as a daily check from a satellite or a canary in the community. The satellite does not have the resolution to see small leaks. However any of the larger leaks will be visible from satellites and will be corrected in a manner of days or

Ditching Your Major Source MACT Requirements

Nicholas Petrich - Chemical Engineer, Barr Engineering

Description

The U.S. EPA issued a new guidance memorandum that repealed the “once in, always in” (OIAI) policy, allowing reclassification of a major source of hazardous air pollutants (HAPs) to an area source. The new guidance concluded that the OIAI policy was contrary to Section 112 of the Clean Air Act (CAA) and that the U.S. EPA did not have the authority to restrict a source from becoming an area source after the first compliance date of the applicable MACT standards. Therefore, a major source that obtains federally enforceable limits on its HAP potential-to-emit (PTE) below the major source thresholds can become an area source. Industrial facilities have the opportunity to consider whether they could operate as area sources of HAPs. This presentation will provide guidance on how and why a facility can become an area source, including the benefits and challenges. A regulatory overview will be provided including the common major source standards that would no longer apply, the potentially applicable area source requirements, and why some requirements won’t go away even though the specific MACT standards may no longer apply. A technical review will also include the critical factors for calculating site-specific HAP emissions from key sources such as process fugitive equipment leaks, wastewater treatment, process combustion, and storage tanks. Lastly, key aspects of implementing federally enforceable emission limits and transition from major source standards will be discussed. Attendees will leave the presentation with an understanding of the advantages of becoming an area source and whether they should sharpen the pencil on their HAP emission calculations.

Diversity & Leadership Panel

Moderated by Angela Zivkovich - , Occidental Petroleum

Description

Crestwood Midstream LP – Victoria Wagner HollyFrontier – Sucheta Gokhale Colorado Research Collabrotory – Maury Dobbie 4C – Uzi Ibrahim

Do you have the Right Tank? Thief Hatch?

James Van Horne - Storage Tank Control System Design Expert, SLR International Corporation

Description

Coming soon.

Does My MOC Affect Relief or Flare System Design

Achilles Arnaez - Senior Process Consultant, Smith & Burgess

Description

Coming soon.

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DOT Control Room Management Risk-Based Alarm Management

Trish Thomason - , Integrity Solutions

Description

Coming Soon.

Downstream Confirmation of Benzene Loading

Kati Petersburg - , Trinity Consultants

Description

Downstream flow rates and concentrations can reflect the characteristics of the total wastewater throughput managed at the facility, where all sewered wastewaters have come together into one stream. Experience indicates that downstream characterization can provide the most accurate values for facility wastewaters. However, the BWON citations emphasize the need to characterize wastes upstream, at the points of generation (POGs), because the rule-writers were concerned that benzene could volatilize from the waste as it flowed through the waste management system. Thus, the TAB quantification must be based on the upstream POG characterizations. It is valuable to assess the accuracy of POG results by comparing the downstream values with the sum of upstream POG values in the sewered streams. Although benzene is dynamic in a refinery sewer system—potentially volatilizing or transferring between the oil and water phases—it is reasonable to expect downstream loadings to be similar to the values derived from summing POG numbers. Agreement in the upstream-downstream evaluation lends confidence to the TAB quantification, the 6BQ or 2-Mg quantification (if needed), and the overall claim of the facility that the BWON wastes were properly identified.

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Downstream Environmental Enforcement Updates

Patrick Traylor - , Vinson & Elkins

Description

This presentation will provide an overview of recent environmental enforcement developments in the Trump administration. The presentation will review EPA's new National Compliance Initiatives, regulatory changes under the Clean Air Act, and other pending changes under Acting Administrator Wheeler's EPA. The presentation also will focus on technological developments and how they are changing compliance and enforcement.

Drone Based OGI OOOOa (Quadcopter Drone)

Efficacy of Moving Bed Biological Reactor (MBBR) for Water Reuse and Distributed Treatment Systems: Industrial and Municipal Applications

Paul Gallego - Process Engineer, Headworks International

Description

Water is a precious resource to sustain both our societal and industrial needs. However, availability of usable water is severely depleting globally. Reuse of treated wastewater has been gaining ground globally to preserve water resources. MBBR is an attached growth treatment process where the biomass is attached to the surface of media as fixed films while the media itself are in continuous motion in the bioreactor by aeration. It offers multiple advantages over suspended growth processes as described in the following. MBBR is a very compact system that occupies a limited space. It is a modular system that can be designed keeping future expansions in mind. An existing treatment system can be easily retrofitted as MBBR with minimal civil works required to accommodate larger load and flow conditions. It is very stable and adjusts automatically to varying load and flow conditions while withstanding shock and toxic loads. During low periods, MBBR can be kept running without much difficulty. This system also does not require any recycling of the sludge and hence no need to maintain MLSS. The chemical consumption is much less compared to a similar advanced technology like MBR. All key internal components for MBBR are very reliable and last a long time with no need for maintenance for several years. It does not require continuous monitoring and highly skilled operators making it suitable for remote operation as needed. These attributes make MBBR very suitable for localized applications in distributed treatment mode. This paper will present the typical treatment trains for: industrial reuse of flowback and produced water in hydrofracturing applications; indirect reuse for landscaping and agricultural applications; and direct, indirect and de-facto potable water reuse. Principles of each of the above three applications will be presented with the help of case studies.

Eliminating H2S & SO2 Emissions at SRU, Coker and Other Sulfur Handling Units of Refineries

Jim Woodard, Sean Kirkpatrick - National Sales Account Executive, Vapor Point, LLC

Description

The Federal Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and state enforcement agencies have placed greater attention on the use of flares, and have in recent years placed new stringent regulations in place to directly impact flare operations (NSPS Subpart Ja), but are also imposing new National Ambient Emissions Standards Vapor Point applies high efficiency liquid scrubbing systems to eliminate Hydrogen Sulfide (H2S), Sulphur Dioxide (SO2) other Sulfur Species as well as other Hazardous Air Pollutants (HAPs) and Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs). Specially designed temporary vessels for liquid and vapor phase product management have also been developed and are key elements in some applications. These control system concepts and resulting proven processes were developed with input from refining personnel who needed alternative technologies that would offer operational flexibility eliminating the various sulfur contaminates. The vapor phase emission control systems and specially designed process vessels have met the needs of the refining industry with numerous field implementations. This paper/presentation will be focused on how the deployment of mobile technologies eliminates H2S & SO2 emissions resulting in improved worker safety while eliminating concerns with Ja regulations.

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Emerging analyzer technologies for CEMS

Ty Smith - President, Cemtek Environmental

Description

CEMTEK KVB-Enertec is a System Integrator and full service organization that builds & supports continuous emissions monitoring systems (CEMS) to meet EPA 40 CFR Part 60, 64, & 75 regulatory requirements and process control monitoring systems on a variety of applications and sources including chemical, cement, glass, refinery, power, biomass, paper, and many others. In this paper we will discuss lessons learned when testing, purchasing and deploying new monitoring technologies to measure NOx, SO2, CO, HCl, NH3, H2S, HF, HCN using lasers & DOAS compared to conventional technologies ranging from Dry Extractive, Dilution, Hot Wet, and In-situ for compliance and process monitoring.

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Emerging Technologies in Leak Detection and Quantification

Stephen Conley, PhD. - CEO and founder, Scientific Aviation, Scientific Aviation

Description

With scientifically-outfitted airplanes, a drone-based quantification and LDAR platform, a mobile laboratory and continuous monitoring devices (in development), Scientific Aviation has become a trusted voice in emissions research and management. Come hear what we’ve learned in our years of global experience, including our in-situ quantification methods and our perspective on emerging technologies in emissions research.

Emissions Reduction Warehousing Analysis: Positioning Your Plant for Growth

Blake Soyars - Department Manager, Air Quality & Noise Services, Burns & McDonnell

Description

Competitive site selection evaluations are standard for strategic projects. An emission reduction warehousing analysis provides competitive advantages for existing major source facilities wanting to host the next big project. A warehousing analysis identifies emissions reduction projects across the facility, estimates total installed cost and timeline for each project, and quantifies available emissions reductions. Emission reductions projects are ranked to determine the lowest cost options for avoiding or minimizing air permitting delays and costs. Without a warehousing analysis, site selection committees may apply worst-case assumptions for federal Prevention of Significant Deterioration and Nonattainment New Source Review air permits, including longer permit timelines and higher costs for emission offsets and emission control technologies. This presentation will start with an overview of federal nonattainment designation actions under the current EPA administration. Then we will outline the steps for conducting a warehousing analysis and the competitive advantages for facilities, especially those located in designated nonattainment areas.

Emissions Reduction Warehousing Analysis: Positioning Your Plant for Growth

Blake Soyers - Department Manager, Air Quality & Noise Services, Burns & McDonnell

Description

Competitive site selection evaluations are standard for strategic projects. An emission reduction warehousing analysis provides competitive advantages for existing major source facilities wanting to host the next big project. A warehousing analysis identifies emissions reduction projects across the facility, estimates total installed cost and timeline for each project, and quantifies available emissions reductions. Emission reductions projects are ranked to determine the lowest cost options for avoiding or minimizing air permitting delays and costs. Without a warehousing analysis, site selection committees may apply worst-case assumptions for federal Prevention of Significant Deterioration and Nonattainment New Source Review air permits, including longer permit timelines and higher costs for emission offsets and emission control technologies. This presentation will start with an overview of federal nonattainment designation actions under the current EPA administration. Then we will outline the steps for conducting a warehousing analysis and the competitive advantages for facilities, especially those located in designated nonattainment areas.

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Enabling Distributed Environmental Compliance Management

Brent Allred - Program Manager, Northrop Grumman Technology Services

Description

Assuring compliance with new and evolving local, state, federal, and even foreign environmental regulations across dispersed enterprises such as the military and many commercial entities is a daunting endeavor for environmental managers at all tiers of the enterprise. It is challenging to maintain compliance risk at an acceptable level while faced with budgetary and manpower constraints in a climate of ever increasing and constantly evolving regulations. To keep pace, many Air Force and Army installations have implemented strategies and tools aimed at distributing the compliance and associated data management workload in order to drive efficiencies in meeting compliance demonstration, recordkeeping and regulatory reporting requirements. This strategy has been largely enabled by the successful implementation and institutionalization of modern information management solutions such as the Air Force’s Air Program Information Management System (APIMS) and the commercially-hosted equivalent, Environmental Program Information Management System (EPIMS). Proper implementation of these systems has been proven to reduce the manpower required to demonstrate compliance and satisfy reporting requirements, while reducing compliance risk. APIMS is a web-based information management system owned by the Air Force. It is hosted at the Defense Information Systems Agency (DISA) and is available to Air Force users worldwide. EPIMS shares the exact same software baseline, is commercially hosted on Amazon Web Services (AWS), and is used by other federal and commercial users under a software as a service (SaaS) subscription model. These proven solutions are being rapidly adopted, with a current user base of over 5,000 regular users and over 150,000 transient users at over 200 installations worldwide. The system was designed to provide all tiers of the enterprise, from the shop level to headquarters level, the tools required to effectively manage compliance risk and to satisfy recordkeeping and reporting requirements. Key compliance activities where APIMS/EPIMS support the distribution of compliance management and drive automation include: generation of air emissions inventories; multi-media compliance assessment management; refrigerant compliance management; RICE NESHAP compliance, storage tank compliance management, and Clean Air Act section 118(d) vehicle inspection and maintenance compliance. APIMS is a proven compliance automation solution that has saved its users countless man-hours, when compared to historical compliance methods. This presentation will highlight specific real world examples of how automation and the distribution of compliance management strategies has helped system users reduce compliance risk and reduce the manpower required to effectively manage environmental compliance in today’s regulatory climate.

End Users Views on Flange Sealing – Using Market Research to Direct Meaningful Product Development

Richard Tym - OEM Market Manager – North America, Garlock Sealing Technologies

Description

Gaskets are meant to solve problems, not make new ones. Facilities are often required to stock multiple thicknesses to account for misaligned or worn flanges. Unfortunately, the two biggest tradeoffs of using thicker gaskets is reduced pressure resistance and reduced sealability characteristics. In fact, 28% of engineers surveyed said that their biggest struggle with gasket installation was ensuring the correct bolt torque and installation practices are used. One of the common misconceptions is that thicker gaskets are better. However, thicker gaskets do not have the blowout or pressure resistance of thinner gaskets. This presentation will illuminate findings from interviews with plant personnel that show the biggest sources of frustration and what is considered the gasket ideal. The presentation also investigates the effects of a introducing a new design feature, a raised surface profiles, on conventional PTFE gasketing and its effects on the performance.

Enforcement: The State and Local Perspective

James Smith - Shareholder, Crain, Caton & James

Description

A perception that the Trump EPA is less than fully committed to enforcing the environmental laws can affect enforcement at the state and local levels, especially in "red state/blue city" communities. This presentation will discuss developing trends and give suggestions for those responsible for facilities where state or local enforcement could be a concern.

Enhanced LDAR Training: An Unconventional Approach to Training LDAR Technicians

Todd Morrison - CEO, Insight Environmental

Description

Is your LDAR training up to date with modern technology? This presentation will detail the process of incorporating technology such as 3D modeling and virtual and augmented reality into your LDAR training.

Environmental Enforcement Update

Carrick Brooke-Davidson - Counsel, Vinson & Elkins

Description

Under the Trump administration, EPA and DOJ have issued several new policies and directives which affect environmental enforcement. This presentation will discuss these new developments, including the, EPA’s new policy on national compliance initiatives, EPA's new policy on referrals to DOJ, DOJ's statement on environmental enforcement policy and principals, and the DOJ policy on use of agency guidance in enforcement. The new DOJ policies are especially significant as they apply to all DOJ enforcement litigation, not just EPA.

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EPA’s Amendments to the RMP Rule – What Are Company Compliance Obligations Under the New Rules and the Old Ones?

Dan Gruzca - Counsel, Hunton, Andrews, Kurth LLP

Description

On January 13, 2017, EPA finalized numerous changes to the existing RMP regulations on accident prevention program elements, emergency preparedness requirements and provisions related to sharing information with the public and local emergency planners/responders. The RMP Amendments were to take effect as of March 14, 2017 but were delayed by EPA until February 19, 2019. However, The RMP Amendments became immediately effective on September 21, 2018 when the delay rule was vacated by the U.S. Court of Appeals for the D.C. Circuit. On December 3, 2018, EPA published a final rule that will incorporate the RMP Amendments into the Code of Federal Regulations. This now raises a series of issues related to compliance obligations for facilities under several provisions for the 2017 RMP Amendments. Interpreting the new language may also be informed by the fact that on May 30, 2018, EPA proposed to revise the provisions of the 2017 RMP Amendments, proposing to rescind amendments relating to safer technology and alternatives analyses, third-party audits, incident investigations, information availability and several other minor regulatory changes This presentation will sort out compliance obligations for facilities under the new rules and the old ones.

EPA’s New Accident Prevention Program Implementation and Other Regulatory Reforms to Expect Before the Election

Shannon Broome - , Hunton, Andrews, Kurth

Description

One of the hallmarks of the Trump Administration’s regulatory reform efforts has been its partial reversal and reconsideration of the US EPA’s chemical accident prevention provisions, which were finalized in December 2019. EPA has also recently reformed several aspects of Clean Air Act permitting that are vitally important to petroleum, chemical, and other manufacturing companies. What does the future hold for these reforms and how have they delivered on the promise of a win/win situation for the regulated community and environmental benefits?

EPA’s Regulatory Reform Agenda One Year In

Leann Johnson-Koch - Partner, Perkins and Coie LLP

Description

In the short time that the new administration has been in place, the effective date of the RMP amendments has been extended while the rule is being reconsidered, the MACT “Once In, Always In” policy has been revoked, and changes to the New Source Review program are imminent. My presentation will discuss, what has been accomplished to date, what reforms are still expected, and the mechanics of how the reform will be accomplished to prevent backsliding by a new administration. I will also examine Department of Justice policy changes that will impact the enforcement of environmental laws, including limiting enforcement to violations of the law and not guidance, and not using settlement to accomplish rulemaking objectives.

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Ethical and Legal Considertations for Environmental Professionals

James Payne - Shareholder, Guida, Slavich & Flores

Description

The title of my presentation is “Ethical and Legal Considerations for Environmental Professionals.”  It is intended to provide ethics credit for professional engineers and geoscientists.  The presentation covers various issues encountered by environmental professionals in their practices including the ethics rules pertaining to engineers and geoscientists, risk shifting provisions in contracts, what constitutes the unauthorized practice of law, and the disciplinary process pertaining to Texas engineers and geoscientists.

Ethylene Oxide CEMS

Steve Hall - , Spectrum Environmental Solutions, LLC

Description

Reducing emissions of ethylene oxide has recently become a focus of U.S. EPA following revised risk assessments for the compound. On November 11, 2019, the U.S. EPA released a pre-publication version of proposed amendments to the Miscellaneous Organic NESHAP (MON). The MON amendments include new monitoring and testing requirements for control devices used to control ethylene oxide emissions. Part of these new requirements include continuous monitoring of ethylene oxide concentrations using Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) Continuous Emissions Monitoring System (CEMS) for control devices other than a flare. This presentation will describe how FTIR can be used to monitor ethylene oxide and elaborate on the continuous ethylene oxide monitoring requirements found in the MON.

Ethylene RTR, What’s the Outlook?

Eric Swisher - , ALL4 Inc.

Description

Per the court-mandated timeline, the EPA is currently working through the statutorily-required risk and technology review (RTR) for the ethylene NESHAP (40 CFR Part 63, Subpart XX and Subpart YY). Industry trade groups have been engaged in meetings with EPA as this process has moved forward. It is anticipated the proposed rule, late this fall, will impact current ethylene operations. It is anticipated the rule will mirror certain aspects of the refinery rule, such as the flare and PRD language and likely will address furnace stack emissions and decoke emissions (both decoke to the fire box and decoke to an atmospheric pot) and potentially waste water emissions. This presentation will discuss the possible proposed rules and the potential impact on the ethylene facilities.

Evolution of EPA Rules from Obama to Trump and Beyond

Suzanne Murray - Partner, HaynesBoone

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Experience with Continuous Emission Monitoring Systems; A Love, Hate Relationship

Richard Lambert - Sr. Environmental Technology Engineer, Eli Lilly, Retired

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Experiences with UAV Inspections and Data-Analytics

Shailendra Singh - Director, Business Development, Honeywell Aerospace

Description

UAV’s are being used extensively in the oil-gas industry to increase safety and quality of data. Honeywell has combined its aerospace and oil-gas expertise to offer oil-gas companies UAV based inspections and data-analytics services. Honeywell will share its experiences in the UAV inspections and data-analytics to increase safety and efficiencies.

Federal, State and Local Enforcement

James Smith - Shareholder, Crain, Caton, & James

Description

The presentation will highlight recent federal environmental enforcement trends and update state and local enforcement developments.

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Fenceline Monitoring for Benzene: What Does a Year's Worth of Data Say?

Nicole Bryson - Experienced Sales/Account Manager, Customer Service, ALS

Description

Major source refineries in the United States were required to begin fenceline monitoring of benzene in January 2018 via passive sampling technology in order to comply with the Refinery Sector Rule. Ten months in, what does the data look like? Is benzene frequently being detected at fencelines of refineries, and if so, at what concentrations? Can any conclusions be drawn, or generalizations made? Is this monitoring necessary? As a laboratory analyzing thousands of samples a month from refineries around the country, ALS Environmental will have a broad, robust data set to examine for trends, in advance of the Compliance and Emissions Data Reporting Interface (CEDRI) which will not be available until Spring 2019. The data set will be analyzed for trends and variability with regard to seasonality and geography, as well as any other factors that may come to light over the course of the year.

Flare BTU Analysis

Robert Paddison - , ThermoFisher Scientific

Description

Why Process Mass Spectrometry is an increasingly popular option for EPA BTU monitoring compliance. Reasons include speciation, high reliability and excellent linearity without needing carrier gas.

Flare CD Updates

Troy Boley - , Spectrum Environmental Solutions

Description

Coming soon.

Flare Gas Composition Analysis and QA/QC & Best Management Practices

Herman Holm - Director, Environmental Services, Spectrum Environmental Solutions, LLC

Description

The now infamous “Table 13” of the Refinery Sector Rule in 40 CFR 63.670 will be presented and discussed along with a review of the historical approach to the flare gas composition analyzer’s Quality Assurance (QA) requirements. The experts at Spectrum Environmental Solutions, LLC (Spectrum) have been involved with a wide variety of industrial flare related issues within the petroleum and petrochemical related industry sectors including detailed instrumentation support. The presentation will provide an understanding of the periodic analyzer QA requirements as generally provided in EPA Performance Specification 9 for GC’s highlighting the shortcomings of the Table 13 RSR requirements, and some recent Flare consent decrees, to provide possible solutions for a reliable flare gas composition analyzer’s quality assurance demonstration.

Flare Gas Measurement Lessons Learned from Refineries & Future of Chemical Plants

Arnold Griswold - , Fluenta Inc.

Description

EPA’s Refinery Sector Rule is about to come online. The new rule will cover all aspects of combustion efficiency to ensure the flare operation is done in a manner that is safe for the environment and safe for the operation of the facility. Refineries will undoubtedly need to take some actions irrespective of whether they use steam or air assisted flares in order to ensure heating values of at least 300 BTU/scft of gas at the flare. This can be done by monitoring gas composition, steam/air flow and flare gas flow rate.As flow rate is part of the calculation supplied to meet the requirements put forward by the EPA, a gas flow meter will need to be used to provide that piece of the puzzle. This presentation will discuss how ultrasonic flow meters have been used to determine the flowrates in refineries and other facilities. A discussion will follow focused on how this technology helps the facility operator comply with the existing and new EPA regulations, and on how much more can be done from the metering perspective to help the implementation of the new EPA rule.

Flare Instrumentation – Minimum "Expectations"

Derek Stuck - , Spectrum Environmental Solutions, LLC

Description

As the U.S. EPA begins expanding the flare requirements first found in the Refinery Sector Rule to other industries, newly affected facilities need to begin planning the installation of new monitoring on covered flares. This potentially includes pilot monitoring, visible emissions monitoring, vent gas flow monitoring, assist gas flow monitoring, and net heating value and/or composition monitoring; all of which will be required to meet the new requirements. This presentation will summarize the monitoring required by the new flare requirements and describe some of the technologies which may be used to comply with the regulations’ requirements.

Flare System Control and Optimization at Refineries and Chemical Plants

Lei Sui - , Baker Hughes

Description

The new Refinery Sector Rule (RSR), passed by the EPA in December 2015, extends and strengthens the regulations governing stationary emission sources, specifically flares in refineries. It calls for the control and monitoring of flare systems, including, for example, meeting the specific requirements of Net Heating Value in combustion zone gas ( NHVcz), smokeless combustion and actual flare tip velocity(Vtip) for steam assist flare systems and additional Net Heating Value dilution parameter(NHVdil) for air assist flare systems. A flare control design, which takes live input of speed of sound from flare meters, was implemented to achieve real-time control using measurement of average molecular weight of an unknown hydrocarbon mixture from the sound of speed. This information can be used by the control system to determine the net heating value of vent gas as well as provide a dynamic ratio control for steam, this provides for a more efficient and responsive control scheme. Combined with the requirement of vent gas NHV imposed by Vtip, a continuous, efficient flare operation of supplemental gas will be demonstrated. By utilizing real time control via the speed of sound measurement provided by the flare meter, the risk of having a block of non-compliance is mitigated. Flare control systems using other schemes, such as controls based on feedbacks from Gas Chromatograph (GC) or calorimeters, were discussed in the paper. Practical implementation of this methodology and data are also discussed in this paper.

Flare System Control and Optimization for MACT CC RSR 63.670

Dan Johnson - Sr. Product Manager, Baker Hughes, A GE Company

Description

The new Refinery Sector Rule (RSR), passed by the EPA in December 2015, extends and strengthens the regulations governing stationary emission sources, specifically flares in refineries. It calls for the control and monitoring of flare systems, including, for example, meeting the specific requirements of Net Heating Value in combustion zone gas ( NHVcz), smokeless combustion and actual flare tip velocity(Vtip) for steam assist flare systems and additional Net Heating Value dilution parameter(NHVdil) for air assist flare systems. A flare control design, which takes live input of speed of sound from flare meters, was implemented to achieve real-time control using measurement of average molecular weight of an unknown hydrocarbon mixture from the sound of speed. This information can be used by the control system to determine the net heating value of vent gas as well as provide a dynamic ratio control for steam, this provides for a more efficient and responsive control scheme. Combined with the requirement of vent gas NHV imposed by Vtip, a continuous, efficient flare operation of supplemental gas will be demonstrated. By utilizing real time control via the speed of sound measurement provided by the flare meter, the risk of having a block of non-compliance is mitigated. Flare control systems using other schemes, such as controls based on feedbacks from Gas Chromatograph (GC) or calorimeters, were discussed in the paper. Practical implementation of this methodology and data are also discussed in this paper.

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Forget About the Feds, States are Moving on Expanded PSM/RMP Rules – Is it California Dreamin’ or a Glimpse into the Future of PSM/RMP Rulemaking?

Daniel Grucza - Senior Attorney, Hunton & Williams, LLP

Description

While the federal arena of regulation on Process Safety Management and Risk Management Plan rules is in a state of limbo, states like California are moving forward. California has recently adopted new PSM and RMP regulations and other states are also beginning regulatory processes to adopt similar changes. These new regulations present challenges for those operating in those states but also threaten to impact interpretation and application of the federal rules and other state rules that are not being changed. This session will review the state of play on the various state rules and will highlight aspects of the new California rules, including the practical challenges to comply with them. It will also cover how these new rules can affect agency interpretation of existing PSM/RMP rules and how companies can review and optimize their PSM/RMP programs to be in position for complying with and defending against citations under some of the key new provisions, such as employee representative participation, hierarchy of controls analysis, human factors, culture assessments and management of organizational changes.

Fugitive Emissions Standards and Laboratory Test Methods for Valves

Greg Johnson - President, United Valve

Description

The last 10 years have seen a surge in concern over fugitive emissions from valves. To meet that concern, both the American Petroleum Institute (API) and the International Organization for Standardization (ISO) have created test methods and acceptance criteria for in-shop valve qualification testing. This presentation will focus on the various test methods and how the tests are performed on all types of valves. Additionally, problems associated with the testing as well as failure modes will be discussed. The presentation will provide a good general overview for those unfamiliar with laboratory valve fugitive emissions testing protocol.

Future of Flare Compliance and Flare Forecast

Troy Boley - Vice President, Spectrum Environmental Solutions, LLC

Description

A decade-plus focus on flares has resulted in several final flare rules, and more are likely on the way! Confidence in efficient combustion is the clear objective. A review of the various flare monitoring systems as required under NSPS Ja and MACT CC has served the refinery sector, but all may not be so simple as we look ahead to other industry sectors. Opportunities for improvement with respect to waste gas flow management, more minimization and continuous process improvement, and data management and documentation are plentiful. In addition, the era of widespread refinery flare projects will soon be behind us, and facilities must look towards the incorporation of the flare rules and their selected approaches into their Title V permit provisions. Soon, many will be tasked with discerning whether the new flare data suggest that there are possible permit deviations or even violations. A look back and look ahead into the expanding issues of flaring will be presented.

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Green Gas & Emissions Intensity

Roy Hartstein - , RES Solutions

Ground Flares, Air Quality Approvals and Requirements

Blake Soyars - Department Manager, Air Quality & Noise Services, Burns & McDonnell

Description

Pressure-assisted multi-point ground flare systems are used to control organic vapor emissions for a growing number of chemical manufacturing facilities. Ground flares serve the same purpose as conventional elevated flares, but current air quality regulations and approval processes are more complicated for ground flares. We will present key steps and challenges in the ground flare approval process, including the TCEQ Alternate Method of Control (AMOC) process and EPA Alternative Means of Emission Limitation (AMEL) process. We will discuss key compliance and permitting implications specific to ground flares at Texas chemical facilities. We will share actual permitting and approval timelines for example Texas ground flare projects.

Growing Regulatory Concerns for $1,000 - Man-made Chemicals widely used in Fire-Fighting Foam: "What are PFAS?"

Tiffany Thomas - , EnSafe

Description

Description coming soon.

H2S Monitor & Safety Shower Technology

Marcio Donnangelo - Global Business Development Manager, Emerson Process Management

Description

Think you’re covered? Radios aren’t always enough. Find out how to improve safety by monitoring safety shower and eye-wash stations, as well as comply with OSHA without incurring complex installation and deployment costs. A safety shower system integration using wireless technology is not only cost-effective, but can provide instant alerts and quick and effective response time.

Handheld and Small-UAV Laser Sensors for Natural Gas Leak Imaging and Quantification

Michael B. Frish, Paul Wehnert & Milton Heath III - , Physical Sciences & Heath Consultants

Description

We present lightweight handheld and aerial natural gas leak survey tools that cost-effectively locate, visualize, and directly quantify emissions from small infrastructure sources, e.g. valves, meters, etc. These tools adapt our widely-used laser sensors (the RMLD®) to platforms that spatially scan the laser beam to create images of emission plumes with high sensitivity, spatial resolution, and temporal resolution. Early prototypes have been deployed aboard small (24”) semi-autonomous unmanned aerial and in a man-portable configuration.

Heated Sample Lines... "Don't judge a sample line by it's jacket - it's much more!"

Otto Hirsch - Global Product Manager, Thermon Inc.

Description

Heated sample lines are the transport between the extraction source (the probe) to the final and critical analyzing monitor. The sample will only be as good and accurate as what the monitor receives. Therefore, it is imperative that the specification, design, manufacturing, installation and maintenance of the sample line be taken into consideration before, during and after. All heated sample lines are not the same and each component plays an intricate part, including – the type and size of tube used, the type of heater, the insulation, the sensor, sensor placement, how the line is constructed, and the outer jacket - as well as the design, the installation and the maintenance. Heated sample lines are preinsulated/pretraced/ and jacketed and therefore all the components and the construction are not visible. There is an old saying: “Don’t judge a book by its cover”. The same can be said for heated sample lines: “Don’t judge a heated sample line by its jacket”. So, whats inside? This presentation/discussion will cover what a heated sample is, the components - tubing types, type of electrical heaters available, outer jacket options, control options, and construction, as well as accessories, installation and maintenance. In addition, can all sample lines be repaired or adjusted in the field and what to do when its time to replace the line. It’s not just a sample line, it’s a custom integral component to complete a total system solution!

Holistic Asset Management Using Methane Data & Analytics

Aaron Van Pelt - , Picarro

Description

Advances in mobile methane detection technology and analytics allow natural gas emissions data to be collected at a speed and scale not previously possible. Concurrent advances in “Big Data” Analytics allow better-informed conclusions to be drawn from that data and action taken. Such data-driven decisions are showing substantial financial benefits in pipe replacement, risk reduction, leak survey and emissions reduction. Methane data can be collected across a natural gas network and then used for multiple applications – an example being annual patrols to find and repair the highest-emitting leaks wherein secondary uses of the same data might be for improved prioritization of pipeline replacement projects and for risk-based leak survey. This revolution in the rapid, wide-scale collection and use of methane data is driving gas operators to use it in all aspects of how they manage their assets.

How a Six Sigma Methodology Can Reduce Your Fugitive Emissions

Dale Rice - Corporate Environmental Engineer , VSP Technologies

Description

Flange and valve leaks account for up to 90% of the fugitive emissions for a typical chemical plant or refinery. A Six Sigma process can be used to effectively address this by optimizing a plant’s fluid sealing management program. Based on practical experience, a successful program integrates a series of eight sequential steps in the gasket / valve packing use process. However, achieving sustained quality improvement requires a clear commitment to employee training and making decisions based on established standards, not assumptions or guesswork. The elements of this Six Sigma process will be presented and discussed.

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How Digital Transformation Can Impact Compliance for Environmental and Safety Regulation

Description

This presentation will give you an overview of how Digital Transformation is eliminating layers of complexity to bring pre–interpreted field data directly to those who need to make decisions and take action. Two examples will be highlighted: Environmental reporting involves flow measurements which must be verified to be accurate. Discovery of an inaccurate measurement can be costly for operators as they may pay fines from the last date they can prove accurate measurement. Meter verification tools make it simple and convenient to prove accuracy over time. Operators will be notified of problems immediately to avoid misreporting and allowing for immediate corrective action. PRVs are no longer isolated mechanical devices that rely on manual rounds as part of a preventive maintenance program. Release and leakage alerts can be wirelessly monitored, and then integrated into reporting and analytical systems. Powerful tools are now available to interpret these patterns and predict future releases before they occur.

How Do You Feel About Storing Your Emissions Data in the Cloud?

Matthew Radigan - , REGS, LLC

Description

Cloud computing means storing and accessing data and programs over the Internet instead of your computer's hard drive. In order to implement a cloud solution, you need some basic tools to connect your data source(s) to the Internet. Connection to the cloud storage needs to be secure, reliable and accessible. Turn on any new WiFi enable device, click through some prompts and you are connected. Technology made it so easy that it doesn’t even require a conscious thought to participate. Will the same environment that drives my social life translate to my workplace and more importantly, help me successful manage my critical air emissions compliance data. Required tools, feasibility and practicality of using cloud computing for compliance applications will be covered during the presentation.

How to Control Flares to Comply with RSR-63.670 Rules

George Cheng - CTO, CyboSoft

Description

Oil refineries must comply with EPA RSR-63.670 rules and chemical plants will need to meet similar regulations in future. Flares must maintain a minimum combustion zone net heating value of 270 Btu/scf. In addition, for air assisted flares, the combustion zone net heating value dilution parameter must be above 22 Btu/sq.ft. In order to achieve these goals, flare control systems are critical. Technically, flare control is very difficult because: (1) The vent gas flow can change widely; (2) The heating value in vent gas can change widely and quickly; (3) Nitrogen is often used as purge gas to maintain positive pressure in the vent pipe, making the process more complex; (4) There are large and varying time delays in the heating value control loops, and (5) The heating value process is extremely nonlinear in different operating conditions. Flares are difficult to control using conventional PID controllers. Model-based control can be costly to develop and maintain. CyboSoft is offering a field-proven flare control solution with its CyboCon Model-Free Adaptive (MFA) control software. In this presentation, we will show how to design control systems for a steam assisted flare and an air assisted flare. We will run real-time control simulations to compare the performance when controlling combustion zone net heating value with different methods under varying operating conditions. CyboSoft’s Flare Process Modeling and Control Simulation Software will be used to demonstrate the following results: (1) A flare process is under good control where the combustion zone net heating value is above 270 But/scf under varying operating conditions; (2) A flare process may not meet the 270 But/scf requirement due to poor steam control; and (3) A flare process is not controlled well due to slow GC data. In the Q&A session, we can discuss: (1) Flare control system design considerations, (2) Vent gas heating value measurement, (3) 15-min data block calculations, and (4) How to integrate a flare control system with an existing DCS.

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How to Digitally Power A Cross-Functional Process Safety Management Program

Doug Martin - Vice President, Business Development, Gensuite, LLC

Description

• Leveraging a digital EHS system to identify opportunities for process safety management (PSM) improvements • Building the bridge between EHS & PSM programs to drive engagement and efficiency • Finding the needle in the haystack: Pinpoint PSM risks in your EHS data

How to Digitally Power A Cross-Functional Process Safety Management Program

Doug Martin - Vice President, Gensuite, LLC

Description

• Leveraging a digital EHS system to identify opportunities for process safety management (PSM) improvements • Building the bridge between EHS & PSM programs to drive engagement and efficiency • Finding the needle in the haystack: Pinpoint PSM risks in your EHS data

How to Integrate Drones into Routine Operations

Steven Fargo - CEO, DataWing Global

Description

DataWing uses aviation skills learned from years of Air Force flying and unmanned services to help large clients scale and integrate drones into routine operations. This presentation will identify how drones and drone-related technology can add value to environmental inspection programs and services. The presenter will also cover the necessary steps required to build a safe and secure drone program in minimum time so that organizations can start realizing this opportunity soon and meet operational and budgetary goals.

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How to Maximize Efficiency for Your Regulatory Overlapping LDAR Program

Tanya Jackson - LDAR Division, Director of Client Accounts, Montrose Air Quality Services

Description

Is your LDAR Program requiring you to comply with local, state and federal regulations? Do you want to better understand how to deal with this overlap? Industry has three levels of regulatory agencies regulating VOC's and Methane emissions, all with their own spin on how to implement an LDAR Program. This overlap has created confusion and non-compliance across the nation. This presentation will provide an overview of the overlapping methane and VOC requirements and line out a step by step program to evaluate the overlap and implement an efficient LDAR Program. I will provide a guide utilizing experiences as an LDAR Project Manager on how to start, manage and QA/QC your regulatory overlapping LDAR Program. We will identify inefficiencies and provide ideas and solutions to inspire you to create workable solutions for your own LDAR Program.

HSE Buy-in, How to Give it, How to Get it, and How to Keep it.

Tom Hutchins - , Kinder Morgan

Description

We all have great ideas, but many fail to get accepted by management and others fail after initial implementation challenges. Getting and keeping senior management buy-in and support are critical success factors for any project or program. The presentation will provide insights into key elements of obtaining senior management buy-in and the keeping the support during the implementation and operations phases of projects.

I got 99 problems… now what? Best Practices for Addressing Audit Findings

Courtney Edge - , Trinity Consultants

Description

Conducting a gap assessment or audit is a great starting point for getting your LDAR program into compliance – but that’s only the first of many steps. After findings, observations, and recommendations are identified, corrective actions must be developed and prioritized appropriately. Depending on the scope and number of identified issues, this can be a daunting task but there are ways to manage the stress and work load accordingly. This presentation will cover what to do after the completion of an audit or gap assessment of your LDAR program.

ICI FLIR and TDLAS Enabled Drone Basics of Capabilities and Functionality

Gary Strahan - , Gary Strahan

Description

Description coming soon.

Implementation of California's Refinery Fenceline Monitoring Rule

George Lipinski, Brian Cochran - , Spectrum Environmental Solutions, LLC

Description

Passive sorption tubes are not enough. The Governor of California signed AB-1647 into law on October 9, 2017, and the South Coast Air Quality Management District adopted Rule 1180 – Refinery Fenceline Monitoring on December 1, 2017. This rule requires state-of-the-art open-path optical equipment to measure “ppb levels” of various air pollutants at or near the property boundary of petroleum refineries processing greater than 40,000 barrels per day. This presentation will highlight for the conference what refinery sites must do for implementation before January 1, 2020, with an emphasis on conceptual fenceline project design, the requirements of the Air Monitoring Plan and Quality Assurance Project Plan, and the potential for utilizing this technology in other states beyond California.

Improving Safety with Wireless Monitoring

Marcio Donnanngelo - Global Business Development Manager, Emerson Process Management

Description

Think you’re covered? Radios aren’t always enough. Find out how to improve safety by monitoring safety shower and eye-wash stations, as well as comply with OSHA without incurring complex installation and deployment costs. A safety shower system integration using wireless technology is not only cost-effective, but can provide instant alerts and quick and effective response time.

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Industrial Gases for Wastewater and Other Environmental Applications in Today’s Refinery

Vince Hartley - Principal Applications Engineer, Airgas, an Air Liquide Company

Description

As Sustainability becomes a more mainstream driver for refining and petrochemical operations, they are also faced with even tighter discharge limitations. Additionally, the mantra of “doing more with less” remains a constant. In turn, the case for utilizing innovative solutions to meet compliance requirements grows ever stronger. This presentation is focused on means of reducing negative emissions, environmental and capital cost impacts and enhancing systems performance associated with pH control, aerobic wastewater treatment and blanketing of hydrocarbons through employment of alternative treatment method solutions. A primary focus is on the known advantages from safety, control, VOC emissions and regulatory aspects compared to commonly utilized options, especially use of mineral acids.

Industry Programs & Emissions Prognostication Panel

Description

Environmental Partnership – Matt Todd One Future – Richard Hyde NASA JPL – Riley Duren

Innovative Sampling and Analysis Techniques for Stack Sampling of PFAS Compounds in Air Emissions from Stationary Sources

Wesley Fritz - , Weston Solutions, Inc.

Description

As air emissions come under heightened focus as a potential PFAS exposure pathway, the need for accurate and defensible PFAS emissions testing data is necessary. This presentation will discuss the derivation of the modified methods developed for the stack emissions sampling and analysis and the results and findings from this work.

Integrating Speciation Data For Chemical Plants and Refineries

John Beath - , JBE

Description

A surprising number of reports rely on chemical speciation data for purchased chemicals, feedstocks, intermediate streams and products. Recent experience with an EPA NEIC inspection underscored the value in centralizing this data for consistency. Calculations related to quantities present onsite (Tier Two), release reporting and threshold determinations (EPCRA/SARA), emissions calculations (EI/TRI), TSCA Manufacturing Inventory (coming in 2020), RMP (Maximum Intended Inventory), PSM (operator process information), OSHA Hazard Communication, and permit applications could benefit from a carefully orchestrated process. Imagine if the system you develop internally could answer simple questions for emergency situations like what’s the composition of the material in that drum, or that heat exchanger; and imagine if a process was in place to keep all of the content revised as process changes occur.

Integrating sUAS with Traditional Methods of Critical Infrastructure Security and Counter Drone Technology

Kwasi Perry - Founder, UAV Survey Incorporated

Description

Kwasi Perry a former Geospatial Intelligence Officer and Multi-Intelligence Fusion Specialist with the National Geospatial Intelligence Agency will discuss how to effectively integrate sUAS platforms into existing methods of critical infrastructure security such as fixed cameras, manned patrols, security fencing, and K9 units. Flight planning, and surveillance with the sUAS that utilize low observable techniques will be discussed. These best practices are sUAS manufacturer agnostic with a few exceptions. Kwasi will also speak about the state of counter-sUAs technologies.

International Cross-Party Efforts to Improve Valve Reliability

Dave Anderson - , Score Valve

Description

Given the important role many automated valves have in reliably containing and manipulating process fluids flow where there are safety, environmental or efficiency implications, it is of critical importance to know that they are fit for purpose and capable of functioning correctly on demand. Furthermore, the control and automation of these operational valves must also have the best possible reliability to ensure zero in-service failures is achieved and maintained. For these reasons, big efforts are being put into developing guidelines, technical reports and recommended practices by a wide range of technical experts worldwide, from the manufacturing, services and operating communities to achieve these goals. This paper will highlight some of the ongoing work of the subject matter experts, technical standards committees and other collaborative working groups around the globe and what implications their work is likely to have on guiding the enhancement of automated valves reliability moving forward. An overview of the work on design for reliability and operational asset management for reliability models will focus delegates’ attention on what controls and practices they currently have in place in their own organizations for valve specification, selection and management and what they may want to additionally implement moving forward, from the latest international publications / thinking. New case studies from major oil and gas operating companies and the technical solutions they have deployed will be examined for effectiveness and compliance with the recommended best practices.

Intricacies of Permitting Fugitive Emissions

Inaas Darrat & Courtny Edge - Director - Chemical Sector Services, Principal Consultant, Trinity Consultants

Description

The Air Permits Division of the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality (TCEQ) published a revised technical guidance document for Chemical Source Fugitive (APDG 6422) in June of 2018. This guidance is aimed to assist with appropriately permitting fugitive sources. With the revision published in June of 2018, TCEQ provides clarification on many contentious issues perhaps most notably more transparent guidance on what types of streams must be considered when quantifying fugitive emissions. This presentation will discuss when and how to permit fugitive emission sources based on TCEQ guidance as well as USEPA expectations.

Intro to EMACT, OLD, HON, and MON Compliance Gases- Take-aways from RSR Experience

Andy Shurtleff - , Airgas

Description

Safety Councils work for petrochemical plants and their contractors to facilitate innovative ways to reduce incident rates resulting in a 95% reduction in recordable accidents. 2018 marked an evolution in deliverables, slowly migrating away from training to develop new workforce compliance and risk management processes. Working within the industry we developed several internationally recognized Best Practices for contractor compliance, risk management, labor cost management. The petrochemical industry consortium, ISTC, made up of downstream and midstream operators, collaborated with contractors bringing years of quantitative data to identify problems that are developing or have occurred in the workplace and formulating solutions, cost structures and most importantly compliance management to combat future issues. The presentation, outlines several of the best practices in contractor compliance and provides insight toward the direction of future efforts associated with hiring, compliance, auditing, accident response and even Department of Homeland Security, CFATS inspections. Specific industry incidents and actual cases are highlighted to demonstrate the reasoning behind the emerging trends and seeks input from audience members on the potential impact to their business operations. Recently adopted across a variety of global operational excellence teams, Emerging Trends in Workforce Compliance is designed to serve as a barometer of future downstream, and midstream compliance requirements.

Introduction to AFPM/API Advancing Process Safety Programs

Ryan Wong - Advanced Safety Engineer, ExxonMobil representing AFPM

Description

American Fuel and Petrochemical Manufacturers (AFPM) and American Petroleum Institute (API) have been managing the Advancing Process Safety (APS) Programs since 2010. This presentation will give a brief overview of the programs, the tool kit that has been created, and AFPM’s Safety Portal. The discussion will be framed around how these tools can be beneficial to an Environmental Professional and how they can aid in the industry-wide knowledge sharing efforts.

Is There A Better Way to Do LDAR?

Brian Whitley - Vice President, Emission Monitoring Service, Inc. (EMSI)

Description

Is there a better way to do LDAR? For years we have cast a broad net over the program and called it compliance. With a closer look we now can call it a waste of money and resources. Is there a smarter way? Yes, there is. Join me and see data that shows a much better way to move the needle and lower our emissions while simultaneously lowering our cost. Smarter LDAR is real. A smaller carbon footprint can exist for every facility by utilizing modern technology and historical data. I hope to see you there.

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Isn’t It Ironic? A Case Study On Dry Seal vs. Wet Seal Centrifugal Compressor Emissions

Brandon Mogan - President & Principal Advisor, Montrose

Description

The EPA has been pushing hard for the conversion from wet- to dry-seal centrifugal compressors for decades in an attempt to reduce emissions from the natural gas industry. Ironically, the opposite may have happened. Data from a recent study by Tora Consulting on centrifugal compressors most commonly found in the industry indicates that emissions from dry seal units are orders of magnitude higher than emissions from their wet seal counterparts. This presentation will provide the ultimate example of “missing the forest for the trees”.

It's Not Dead, It's Mostly Dead - CD Termination

Suzanne Murray - Partner, HaynesBoone

Description

What is the process for terminating a consent decree with EPA and the Department of Justice? Is the process improved in this Administration or are terminations still stalled by disagreements over terms and what does "done" mean? This presentation will walk through the current overview of PRI CDs that have been terminated and lessons learned for those still open and for future agreements.

Kinder Morgan Methane Reduction Activities: Where are We Now and Where Do We Go From Here

Karen Nielsen - Director, EHS Compliance, Kinder Morgan

Description

Karen will discuss how Kinder Morgan started methane reduction activities, achievements to date, and plans for improving programs going forward.

Lab Test Methodology for PFAS Analysis

Martha Maier - , Vista Analytical Lab

Description

Description coming soon.

Large Area Fugitive Emission Monitoring In All Conditions

Dr. Sophie Purser - Commercial Manager, MIRICO

Description

We present a detailed description and experimental results for a new laser sensing technique in combination with a gas emission survey method that remotely detects and maps the locations of multiple gas emission sources distributed across an extensive area. This presentation will focus on the application of this approach to methane and present results form an experimental evaluation of its performance using 17 calibrated releases, with support from he National Physical laboratory to create traceable standards. Our laser sensing approach, which we call Laser Dispersion Spectroscopy (LDS), uses changes in refractive index incurred by the optical beam to measure molecular concentration as opposed to traditional methods that depend of the intensity of the optical beam to quantify emission. The sensor offers improvements in precision, beam length, accuracy whereby the system inherently isolates common noise sources and offers enhanced performance in open path environments where detected optical intensity variation occurring form artefacts such as rain, water vapour result in inaccuracies when using traditional absorption techniques. Our experimental data set comprise of 7 optical beams that are sequentially steered on a timescale of ˜1Hz. Simultaneously we acquire 3D ultrasonic anemometry data and use this to drive a simple plume eddy dispersion model.

Large Area Fugitive Emission Monitoring in All Conditions - Laser Dispersion Spectroscopy

Description

MIRICO’s technology is designed to continuously and autonomously measure total facility methane emission rates, as well as detect, localise and quantify fugitive emissions. We will present data exemplifying the use of the technology in adverse weather conditions with no reduction in performance. It is the use of the novel laser dispersion spectroscopy technique which allows the instrument to output such accurate, precise and reliable measurements, even in rain, snow, or fog.

Large Area Fugitive Emission Monitoring in All Conditions - Laser Dispersion Spectroscopy

Description

MIRICO’s technology is designed to continuously and autonomously measure total facility methane emission rates, as well as detect, localise and quantify fugitive emissions. We will present data exemplifying the use of the technology in adverse weather conditions with no reduction in performance. It is the use of the novel laser dispersion spectroscopy technique which allows the instrument to output such accurate, precise and reliable measurements, even in rain, snow, or fog.

Launcher and Receiver Consent Decree

Rob McHale & Jake Fournier - , MPLX G&P & Marathon

Description

MPLX LP, through its subsidiaries MarkWest Liberty Midstream & Resources, L.L.C. and Ohio Gathering Company, L.L.C., has entered into a first-of-its-kind agreement with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania and the U.S. Department of Justice to implement design and operating improvements at pipeline launcher and receiver stations. As a result of these best management practices, emissions from these operations are expected to be reduced by as much as 85 percent. As part of the agreement, we are sharing our proprietary designs for “pig ramps” to minimize liquid loss during pig retrieval and information on the installation of depressure systems to reduce the pressure in the launcher/receiver chamber prior to opening.

LDAR - Real World Problems

Earl Hassel & Jeff O'Neal - LDAR Coordinators, Chevron Phillips Chemical Company

Description

Real World LDAR is a presentation of the day to day struggles for monitoring, routine and non-routine maintenance and the best practice efforts to help minimize these struggles. We will show some good tools to use to prevent the repeat of bad actor leaks and ways to discover modifications outside of a Management of Change process.

LDAR 2.0: LDAR for Environmental Compliance and LDAR for Operational Excellence

Steve Probst and Dave Anderson - Co-Founder & CEO and Sales and Marketing Director, 4C Marketplace and Score Valves

Description

Description coming soon.

LDAR 2025 – What Does The Future Look Like and How Will The Industry Evolve?

Jerry Duke Jr. - Director of Business Development, HydroChemPSC

Description

This presentation will dive into the future state of LDAR, the technologies, and how the Alternative Work Practice (AWP) will drive the change. Remote sensing, drone and infrared camera technologies are improving every day and will drive big change within the LDAR industry. What we thought was a pipe dream is now a reality.

LDAR Case Study Comparison of Conventional Method 21 vs Alternative Work Practice

Terence Trefiak - Vice President, Montrose Air Quality

Description

I am the Managing Director of Target Emission Services. We provide fugitive emission surveys for the natural gas industry (transmission, processing, storage and LNG). We specialize in using Optical Gas Imaging (OGI) to detect hydrocarbon leaks and vents for regulatory compliance (EPA Subpart W - Green House Gas). However, we have started to utilize OGI to meet our natural gas processing clients various LDAR requirements (EPA OOOO and KKK) by following the Method 21 Alternative Work Practice (AWP) which allows for the use of optical infrared hydrocarbon detection. This AWP was released to provide industry with an option to use Optical Gas Imaging to replace “conventional” TVA type LDAR equipment for Method 21 facility inspections. OGI uses a specialized filtered infrared camera to provide a real time video of hydrocarbon gas leaks that are invisible to the human eye. The camera can survey up to 1000-1500 components per hour (compared to only 50 components/hour with conventional equipment), surpassing both the efficiency and effectiveness of traditional hand held gas analyzers. In addition many components that are classified as difficult to monitor using conventional hand held equipment can be readily scanned at a distance with the camera. A video of each emission source can also be recorded to provide the exact location of the leak and helps to ensure that the correct repair actions are being made. The use of OGI is on average 10 – 20 times more efficient that conventional LDAR equipment presenting a significant cost savings.The main questions are, • Is the AWP approach as actually as effective as the conventional LDAR approach? • Why are most LDAR contractors not using the AWP approach?• What are the tangible benefits (cost, # and size of leaks detected, safety, etc.) of OGI vs Conventional?My presentation will attempt to answer these questions using actual case study data from 2 large gas processing facilities. The presentation will compare survey results from both OGI and conventional monitoring and show specific examples (survey cost/durations, leak videos, etc.)

Lessons Learned in Emergency Response Exercise Planning

CISA Region 6 - , DHS CISA Region 6

Description

Description coming soon.

Levels of Compliance

Tanya Jackson - LDAR Division, Director of Client Accounts, Montrose Air Quality Services

Description

This presentation focuses on the various levels of compliance that a company can take within an LDAR Program. From being in regulatory compliance to consent decrees to taking preventative measures and actively seeking improvement.

Leveraging Digital Twin technology to reduce inspection-related defects and optimize your LDAR program

Description

LDAR programs are based upon accurate inspections, timely repair, and proper identification of required components which need to monitored. Without the aforementioned, components working in parallel, your program maybe missing critical inspection points. Learn how Bureau Veritas is improving internal quality and helping our clients develop world-class fugitive emissions programs through our methodology.

Lightweight, Modular OOOOa Certified OGI Camera Core for Handheld, UAV, or Fixed Mount CMS

Jeff Leake - VP of Sales, Sierra Olympic Technologies, Inc.

Description

The Ventus (OGI) camera core features a 640 x 512, 15-micron pixel-pitch, "Hot" midwave-infrared (MWIR) detector array providing unmatched thermal sensitivity and weighs only 580 grams (1.28 lbs.), with lens. Designed to optimize the detection and visualization of hydrocarbon gas leaks, such as methane, propane, butane, and 20 others. The “Hot-MWIR” Ventus OGI is a lightweight, low-power, camera core that can be integrated into gimbals/enclosures for manned or unmanned aerial system platforms or for fixed mounted continuous monitoring systems. Sierra-Olympic’s compact (146.6 mm x 70.9 mm x 73.1 mm/5.77 in x 2.70 in. x 2.88 in.) OGI camera features a special narrow bandpass cold filter in a miniature, long-life, closed-cycle Stirling cooler with an f/1.5 cold shield and an optimized, light weight, f/1.5, 25mm lens. State-of-the-art components including the detector, cooler, and lens design, combine with a selection of digital and analog inputs/outputs (Camera Link, H.264 IP Video, NTSC/PAL video plus RS-232/RS-422 serial camera control) to make this camera core an ideal optical gas imaging solution for integrators, OEMs and end users. Additional features include: a 32GB SD storage card, Contrast Limited Adaptive Histogram Equalization (CLAHE), Local Area Processing (LAP), Automatic Gain Control (AGC), Sharpening, DeNoise, Gas Enhancement Mode (GEM) and Electronic Image Stabilization (EIS). Optional items will include Target Tracking, Telemetry, NMEA and GPS i/o.

Live Demo: Improving Sample Probe, Chiller, and Filter Performance

Donny Klotz - , M&C TechGroup North America

Description

Live demonstration to teach the audience about the many ways in which various Continuous Emissions Monitoring System components can be improved, optimized and properly specified for various applications. We'll discuss sample transport and conditioning considerations associated with extractive probe configurations, gas chiller options, filtration materials and temperature controls, and help end-users identify and overcome common CEMS challenges.

Looking Down the Road: The Future of Ground Flares and AMELs

Troy Boley - , Spectrum Environmental Solutions, LLC

Description

Facilities using pressure-assisted multi-point ground flares have requested Alternative Means of Emissions Limitations (AMELs) from the U.S. EPA to operate above the limits on exit velocity found in the General Provisions and Refinery Sector Rule. On October 9, 2019, the U.S. EPA proposed amendments to the Ethylene Maximum Achievable Control Technology (MACT) standards. These proposed changes include a new set of compliance requirements for ground flares without the need to request an AMEL. This presentation will review the new requirements for ground flares found in the Ethylene MACT draft rule. The presentation will also discuss how these proposed changes could affect ground flares in other sectors and the future of the AMEL process.

LUMEN Terrain - Continuous Ground-Based Digital Methane Monitoring

Myalee Muller - , Baker Hughes

Description

Launched in 2017, Avitas Systems is a Baker Hughes company focused on improving safety, protecting the environment, reducing asset downtime and decreasing overall inspection time and cost over traditional manual methods. To do so, Avitas Systems uses automated robotics and its suite of Artificial Intelligence software to accelerate inspections and provide applied intelligence to its customers, so that they can act on it rapidly, by accessing Avitas’s SaaS platform and optimizing their maintenance & repairs plans. In the Permian, Avitas Systems uses drones to accelerate such well sites inspections data gathering, then processes images and videos with its AI-based Computer Vision algorithm to create useful risk-based reports to Oil & Gas operators. Our goal is to inspect hundreds of Permian well sites in one day, and report to each operators the next morning for their 7 am operation meeting, so they can not only better plan and prioritize their daily routes, but also take the necessary parts and tools required to maintain or repair identified equipment issues or failure. Some of the critical inspection points are liquid or gas leaks, such as Fugitive Methane Emissions (“FME”), flares status and efficiency, advanced corrosion damage, overall equipment status (heaters, separators, scrubbers, pumps), tank volumetric, hazardous material, proper signage, solar panel position and overall well site operating conditions. Learn more at www.avitas-systems.com

Managing Major Source Aggregation Air Permitting Risks

Blake Soyars - Department Manager, Air Quality & Noise Services, Burns & McDonnell

Description

Operating companies with capital investment plans may be exposed to project aggregation risks if: Multiple new facilities are constructed within several miles of each other (facility aggregation); or multiple capital projects are performed at the same facility with overlapping construction or short intervals between project activities (project aggregation). EPA has historically applied several project aggregation tactics to require a federal New Source Review (NSR) air permit and facility aggregation tactics to require federal Title V operating permits. Federal NSR and Title V permits involve extensive public notification and comment processes and additional compliance burdens. Federal permitting for capital projects can cause lengthy project delays, require additional expensive air pollution abatement equipment, and drive other unexpected costs. We will discuss past agency challenges, key risk indicators, the latest developments, and strategies to manage the risks.

Mass Spectrometers for BTU in Flare Determination

Robert Paddison & Don Rodriguez - Regional Sales Manager - Process Mass Spectrometry & RSM - North America Process Monitoring Sales Leader, Thermo Fisher Scientific

Description

Process mass spectrometry is a fast and effective technique for measuring flare BTU and increasingly popular for regulatory compliance.

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Measurement & Speciation Using Mass Spectroscopy Flare Gas Composition

Chuck deCarlo - , Extrel Core Mass Spectrometers

Description

As refineries continue to optimize their approach RSR 63.670 compliance, new regulations for flare emissions are set to hit a broad range of industries over the next five years. The goal is to ensure the destruction of Hazardous Air Pollutants (HAPs) prior to release into the atmosphere, but drastic changes in vent gas composition make controlling that efficiency difficult. Getting the full composition of the vent gas quickly allows operations to apply corrections as soon as possible. Flare gas mass spectrometers measure hydrocarbons, carbon oxides, hydrogen, sulfurs, moisture and various volatile organics, and report concentrations and Net Heating Value (NHV) to the control system in seconds. Examples from recent ethylene flare gas regulations and MON sites will be covered in the discussion, along with data from oil refinery flare events.

Measurement Technologies and Innovative Digital Solutions for Flare Management

Description

Knowing the effects of flare system activity is not the same as knowing the hidden causes coming from behind the headers. And just controlling the flare stack is not enough. New asset monitoring technologies give granular insight into ancillary equipment for better flare management operations. With this never-captured-before data and analysis, you’ll be able to make timely corrections or elimination of the root causes. Find out how to get to the next level of operational performance and compliance with this new diagnostics technology.

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Meeting Flare Emissions Regulations with BTU Measurement

Tom Watson - Mass Spectrometer Product and Application Specialist, AMETEK Process Instruments

Description

Learn how mass spectrometer technology can be used to meet emissions requirements by measuring BTU in the flare gas. This session will cover the methods of BTU determination, and will outline the advantages of a mass spectrometer analyzer - speed, accuracy, range, etc. - while discussing application specifics, and total cost of ownership and maintenance needs. There will also be a review of mass spectrometry technology, components, and functions.

Methane Detection using Satellites

Description

Coming soon.

Methane Emissions - Adopting a find it, fix it mentality!

Scott Wallis - , Score Valves

Description

When companies detect a fugitive emission on their asset, it usually gets added to a leak register for repair at the next convenient opportunity. Because so many "weeps" can exist at any one time, if the repair program is not efficient and weeps are not repaired in a timely manner, this not only costs the asset money and affects performance, it becomes a serious safety and environmental issue. If just one leak was to escalate and shut the plant down, this has a huge financial cost and knock on impact. The message - It can be avoided if we find and repair our weeps regularly.

Methane Emissions - Whatever you do… do something!

Scott Wallis - , Score Valve

Description

Touching on the impact that methane emissions have on companies, acknowledge that they will have some form of strategy in place for managing their emissions on their assets, cover these broadly but highlight improvement opportunities, concluding with an empowering message around best "current" practices.

Methane Leaks Detected Over San Juan Basin Using Aerial Data

Sean Donegan - , Satelytics

MPV, PRD & MSS Best Management Practices at Refineries & Opportunities for Chemical Plants

Troy Knuston & Meg Sloan - , Sinclair Oil & Sage ATC

Description

Sinclair Wyoming Refining Company (SWRC) and Sage ATC will lead a diverse panel discussion examining the practical and technical challenges presented by implementing the Refinery Sector Rule miscellaneous process vent (MPV) and maintenance vent documentation requirements into everyday compliance. On the practical side, SWRC will discuss unique challenges faced at the refinery level, including MPV group classification, monitoring and documenting maintenance activities, and helping operators understand and adjust to the new requirements. On the technical side, Sage ATC will discuss broader industry perspectives including efficient approaches to tracking and monitoring maintenance activities, a deep dive to MPV monitoring and compliance management, and strategic considerations when developing and implementing MPV procedures and practices. The panel discussion will be interactive and adaptive. Members of the audience will be polled to determine the practical, technical, and legal issues that the audience members are facing, and the presentation will be adapted to focus on the issues of greatest interest. Members of the audience will also be polled to submit questions, e.g., technical and legal questions or concerns that they may not be comfortable having attributed to their companies.

MSS Support Services

TBD - , Gem Mobile

Description

Coming soon.

Natural Draft Low-Emissions Combustors

- , Ashcor & Clearsign Combustion

Description

ASHCOR’s Low Emissions Combustor, powered by ClearSign Core™ technology, achieves the industry’s lowest NOx and CO emissions while maintaining a greater than 99.99% destruction efficiency. All units are equipped with ASHCOR flame arresters and Profire burner management controls that improve site safety and add a sense of reliability to the constant risk in the oil and gas industry.

New Absorption Technology for VOC Capture

Ray Ozdemir and Jeff St. Amant - , Framergy Inc. & Vapor Point, LLC

Description

"While technology focus in our industry has been centered on automation and monitoring capabilities, little new science has been developed. Vapor Point working with its partner framergy, Inc have begun exploring the industrial usability of a new material science known as Metal Organic Frameworks. Through this partnership, we’ve performed lab and pilot scale testing of various technologies important to our industry including absorption of light hydrocarbons from atmospheric emissions, separation of light hydrocarbons, capture of H2S from vapor and aqueous phase sources and absorption of contaminates in waste waters. This presentation will review the developments of this new material science for the absorption and reuse of captured VOCs from otherwise atmospheric emissions. We will review our current progress as part of our current EPA SBIR Grant, focused on absorption of light VOCs not easily managed with Activated Carbon. "

New and Emerging Fenceline Monitoring Technologies: Current vs Emerging Technology Strategies for Sampling and Quantitation of HRVOC and OHAP in Ambient and Emission Sources

Peter Zemek - , Montrose Environmental

Description

Various types of sampling and analysis strategies have been developed and implemented for the identification and quantitation of HRVOC and other OHAP. This presentation will present the advantages and disadvantages of the current testing methods, and compare and contrast them to emerging technologies that are currently in development for the field and laboratory. Discussion will focus on sampling and analysis techniques including gas chromatography via USEPA Method 18, USEPA Method 320 for organics, optically enhanced FTIR for low level detection of specific organic analytes, and quantitation of various ultra-low detection limit concentrations of HRVOC and OHAP using real-time Proton Transfer Time of Flight Mass Spectroscopy (PTR) and GC Interfaced PTR compliance testing by EPA Method 18. Emphasis will be placed on the emerging technologies utilized by PTR mass spectrometry instrumentation.

New Building Downwash Options in AERMOD

Sergio Guerra - , GHD Services

Description

The presentation will cover the new building downwash options included in the August 2019 version of AERMOD. The current Plume Rise Model Enhancements (PRIME) formulation in AERMOD has a number of theoretical flaws that have been documented on the treatment of downwash in AERMOD. A renewed interest and scrutiny of these downwash shortcomings fueled a parallel, yet complementary, effort led by industry and EPA. These efforts led to the new experimental Alpha options available in the new version of AERMOD. These Alpha options were developed by the PRIME2 committee and EPA’s Office of Research and Development The current presentation will cover the new Alpha options developed along with the implications of this new process to add new science to the regulatory model.

New Developments in Environmental Enforcement

Carrick Brooke-Davidson - Counsel, Vinson & Elkins

Description

Under the Trump administration, EPA and DOJ have issued several new policies and directives which affect environmental enforcement. This presentation will discuss these new developments, including the, EPA’s new policy on national compliance initiatives, EPA's new policy on referrals to DOJ, DOJ's statement on environmental enforcement policy and principals, and the DOJ policy on use of agency guidance in enforcement. The new DOJ policies are especially significant as they apply to all DOJ enforcement litigation, not just EPA.

New EPA Flare Regulations – How Does Gas Measurement Help?

Arnold Rivas-Griswold - Regional Manager North America, Fluenta Inc.

Description

EPA’s Refinery Sector Rule is about to come online. The new rule will cover all aspects of combustion efficiency to ensure the flare operation is done in a manner that is safe for the environment and safe for the operation of the facility. Refineries will undoubtedly need to take some actions irrespective of whether they use steam or air assisted flares in order to ensure heating values of at least 300 BTU/scft of gas at the flare. This can be done by monitoring gas composition, steam/air flow and flare gas flow rate. As flow rate is part of the calculation supplied to meet the requirements put forward by the EPA, a gas flow meter will need to be used to provide that piece of the puzzle. This presentation will discuss how ultrasonic flow meters have been used to determine the flowrates in refineries and other facilities. A discussion will follow focused on how this technology helps the facility operator comply with the existing and new EPA regulations, and on how much more can be done from the metering perspective to help the implementation of the new EPA rule.

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New EPA Programs to Expedite Resource Conservation Recovery Act (RCRA)

Lloyd Dunlap - Senior Geologist, Trihydro

Description

Completing Resource Conservation Recovery Act (RCRA) Corrective Action is typically along and costly process. Two ways are presented to speed up or reduce costs in RCRA Corrective Action.A new program from the United States Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) is called RCRA FIRST. This program greatly streamlines and optimizes the steps within RCRA Corrective Action. In addition, the USEPA has now included a new Environmental Indicator (EI) called CA550 OF. CA550OF outlines a way to defer remedy construction at an operating facility if the remedy is within critical process units or manufacturing equipment.RCRA FIRST is a new program from the EPA to expedite RCRA Corrective Action. RCRA FIRST initiates optimized communication between the regulators and the industry by setting up a CorrectiveAction Framework (CAF) meeting at the beginning of the RCRA phase. Hard issues are discussed and decided before any fieldwork or report writing is done. Having the critical discussions at the beginning allows for early mutual understanding and agreement of goals and expectations.The USEPA now has a new EI that can allow construction-remedy deferral at operating facilities forRCRA Corrective Action. The "Environmental Indicators Initiative" was started in 1997 to improve the agency's ability to report on the progress of achieving RCRA Corrective Action goals. The USEPA then established specific goals for facilities to measure performance and progress in RCRA Corrective Action.The USEPA’s goal is to have a final remedy constructed by September 30, 2020 at 95% of the RCRACorrective Action facilities on their GPRA baseline list. Due to the proximity of critical process or manufacturing equipment, along with safety concerns, constructing a remedy is difficult or impossible at portions of many operating or manufacturing facilities. As a result of years of negotiations and meetings, the USEPA now has a new final remedy-construction metric at operating facilities is called CA550-OF.A facility and the USEPA can achieve their 2020 goals for Remedy Construction by deferring remedy construction at critical locations within an operating site if certain conditions are met.

New Flare Requirements within the Ethylene, MON, and OLD MACTs

Herman Holm - , Spectrum Environmental Solutions, LLC

Description

Regulations requiring improved monitoring and control of flares at petroleum refineries are starting to be passed along to other manufacturing sectors. In October 2019, the U.S. EPA proposed amendments to the Generic Maximum Achievable Control Technology Standards for Ethylene Production (EMACT). Among those amendments are new monitoring and operational requirements related to flares at ethylene production facilities. Also, in recent months, the U.S. EPA has published draft rules affecting organic liquid distribution (OLD) operations and portions of the chemical sector. These requirements are found in what are commonly referred to as the OLD MACT and Miscellaneous Organic NESHAP (MON). This presentation will summarize the new flare requirements and will draw heavily on the lessons learned from implementing the similar flare requirements in the refining sector.

New Source Review: What to Look for in Upcoming Reforms

Colin McCall - Chief Technical Officer, All4 Inc.

Description

This presentation will provide an overview of the most challenging issues posed by the New Source Review (NSR) construction permitting program for expansion projects. The key aspects of NSR will be summarized along with how they fit in with real world projects (and what makes them most challenging for real world projects). The discussion will then lead to the common sense regulatory and policy reforms that are needed to address these challenges. Finally, we will discuss the current status and anticipated implementation of upcoming reforms to the NSR program by Congress and U.S. EPA. This presentation could serve as an overview for those following the regulatory reform process and also as a primer to those that are attending the in depth NSR workshops.

New Technology for the Removal of Sulfur Compounds from Hydrocarbon Products, Helping Combat Economic Strains Caused by Tier II and III Sulfur Credits

Jeff St. Amant - , Vapor Point, LLC

Description

While technology focus in our industry has been centered on automation and monitoring capabilities, little new science has developed in meeting the challenges that high sulfur oil and gas production has brought with it. Vapor Point and its partnership with Baker Hughes has developed new mobile technologies focused on helping clients mitigate quality issues with hydrocarbon feedstocks and products. In addition to this new mobile deployment, Vapor Point has created new chemistries capable of extracting sulfur species such as butyl mercaptan, which cannot be managed with amines or other specialty chemical technologies. This presentation will discuss existing applications where Vapor Point has assisted clients with improving the quality of both feedstocks and saleable fuels by removing unwanted sulfur contamination such as Hydrogen Sulfide, Methyl Mercaptan, Ethyl Mercaptan, Propyl Mercaptan and Butyl Mercaptan.

New Technology with the Potential to eliminate PFAs and PFOAs from water sources

Ray Ozdemir, Jeff St. Amant - , Framergy Inc. & Vapor Point, LLC

Description

PFAs and PFOAs have generated significant public and environmental regulatory interest recently. While there do exist current treatment approaches, the options are limited. Vapor Point working with its partner Framergy, Inc have begun exploring the industrial usability of a new material science known as Metal Organic Frameworks. Through this partnership, we’ve performed lab and pilot scale testing of various technologies important to our industry including absorption of light hydrocarbons from atmospheric emissions, separation of light hydrocarbons, capture of H2S from vapor and aqueous phase sources and absorption of contaminates in waste waters. This presentation will review the developments of this new material science for the capture and destruction of PFAs and PFOAs. We will review our current progress as part of our current EPA SBIR Grant, focused on elimination of the contaminates from drinking water supplies.

Nonparametric Trajectory Analysis (NTA) to Locate Local Emission Sources of Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs) Potentially Affecting Fence-line Monitoring Programs

Robert Wallace - Business Lead, Source Location Group

Description

Nonparametric Trajectory Analysis (NTA), a receptor-oriented data analysis method can provide the average TVOC concentration as recorded at a receptor, provided the air parcel has passed through a specific point prior to reaching the receptor site. We demonstrate the approach using a diffusive sensor technology and a 5-minute sampling interval from a single station to reveal information on all local, near-field source locations within a ten-kilometer radius. Using this method, about 18,000 data points of total volatile organic compound (TVOC) observations were collected in a two-month period in Galena Park, Texas. The NTA plot for Galena Park during August and September of 2018 shows that TVOC contributions includes two significant source areas, neither of which includes the major processing units along the Ship Channel but both sources areas are apparently associated with railroad tank car and tanker truck loading/unloading operations, and storage tanks. High-frequency sampling of ambient air increases the information content available for discerning source locations and source characteristics as compared to traditional methods using averaging periods. For example, two-week average data obtained from passive samplers typically mask patterns that contain information about source locations and contributions. More frequent recording of concentration data and wind direction/speed can greatly improve the attribution of interfering, non-regulated emission sources in conjunction with fence-line monitoring programs.

NSPS OOOOa: Updates, Equivalency, and the Alternative Work Practice

Karen Marsh - US EPA, OAQPS, Sectors Policies and Programs Division, US EPA

Description

On October 15, 2018, EPA proposed technical revisions to the NSPS OOOOa. The proposal addressed many topics, including the application process for the use of emerging technologies for fugitive emissions detection. There have been various efforts to develop frameworks for understanding equivalency but several questions remain unanswered, particularly around how EPA will evaluate potential alternatives. On December 22, 2008, EPA published a voluntary alternative work practice for LDAR using optical gas imaging, which may provide some insight into future equivalency evaluations for sources in NSPS OOOOa. Since promulgation of the alternative work practice, advancements have been made in leak detection technologies that warrant examination of revisions to that rule as well. This presentation will provide a brief status update of the technical amendments to NSPS OOOOa including examining key questions regarding emerging technologies and equivalence to the OGI fugitive emissions program. This presentation will also explore how updates for the alternative work practice may provide insight for evaluating equivalency for OOOOa. 1 Hour Presentation.

Obtaining the Vertical Wind and Flux Profile with Optical Technology

James Shinkle - Business Development, Optical Scientific

Description

This presentation will discuss LOA technology and how it can be used to help obtain the vertical wind and flux profile. There are many benefits of using a LOA Technology (Long Path Optical Anemometer) as a tool for tracking movements of large bodies of air, hazardous wind movements and atmospheric turbulence. We will discuss applications where LOA and OWV (Optical Wind and Vortex) Sensors have been combined with other instruments to more accurately monitor air pollution movement and wake vortex. Developed in the 1970‘s by ERL/NOAA, LOA simultaneously measures the average wind across the optical beam (crosswind) and the turbulence (CN2) over the measurement path. LOA and OWV have proven LOA technology in a number of diverse applications, including monitoring pollution drift from Denver to Greeley Colorado, tracking the movement of noxious odor from a large scale hog farm and measuring airflow velocity of HF gases from aluminum smelting operations where it has received EPA Method 14 Equivalency Approval. LOA technology has been extensively field tested as part of NASA’s Airspace Systems Program to help Airports to detect the effects of a wake vortex on or near ground level. Using two or more LOAs can provide large area 2 dimensional wind vectors that no other sensors could possibly measure. Adding additional sensors three or more LOAs to form a closed contour, provides not only large area 2-dimensional wind vectors, it can also provide the near ground vertical wind (below the inversion layer). This versatile technology results in both very powerful research tool and rugged / time proven operational instrument to provide critical information for large areas wind, dust, pollution and be set up for monitoring and tracking in one, two or three spatial dimensions.

Oil & Gas Enforcement Update

Oil & Gas Federal Enforcement Update

Patrick Traylor - , Vinson & Elkins

On-Going BWON Compliance Concerns

Ken Garing - Principal, Ken Garing & Associates

Description

Compliance issues with the BWON requirements have evolved since the regulation was introduced in the 90’s. In the early 2000’s, numerous deficiencies, ranging from the identification of regulated waste streams to the proper operation of control equipment, resulted in enhanced BWON requirements being included in the refinery global consent decrees. Since that time, a tremendous amount of work has been directed to this effort and the refining sector has made great strides in improving compliance with the BWON regulation. Mr. Garing will present his thoughts on where current efforts could be focused to further improve compliance.

Once in, Not Always In

Nicholas Petrich - Chemical Engineer, Barr Engineering

Description

The EPA issued new guidance that repealed the “once in, always in” policy, allowing reclassification of a major source of hazardous air pollutants (HAPs) to an area source. Therefore, a major source that obtains federally enforceable limits on its HAP potential-to-emit below the major source thresholds can become an area source. This presentation will provide guidance on how and why a facility can become an area source, including the benefits and challenges. A regulatory overview will be provided, including the common major source standards that would no longer apply, the potentially applicable area source requirements, and why some requirements won’t go away even after reclassification. Also, a technical review will include the critical factors for refining site-specific HAP emissions.

ONE Future – The Search for The Best Way to Reduce Methane Emissions

Tom Hutchins - VP EH&S of Kinder Morgan, ONE Future

Description

The ONE Future Commitment is intended to drive action to achieve segment-specific methane emissions intensity reductions, established through the ONE Future Coalition. ONE Future's overall goal is to achieve a methane emissions "leakage rate" (defined as emissions per volume of production or volume of throughput) of 1% or less along the natural gas value chain by 2025. The option allows each operator to determine the most efficient and effective means for managing and reducing methane emissions. The option will also help stimulate research and development to best manage and minimize methane emissions.

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OOOOa LDAR Compressor Station Case Study Results

Terence Trefiak - President, Target Emission Services

Description

In 2017, the EPA OOOOa regulation has come into effect. This regulation imposes OGI LDAR monitoring at new and modified compressor stations across the USA. Many of these facilities had no previous LDAR requirements and there has been significant speculation on what will be found during these monitoring events.

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Opening Up the Opportunities for Performance Verification and Reliability Enhancement of Valves

Dave Anderson - , Score Valves

Description

Most fugitive emission reduction / elimination efforts in the industrial community, especially at chemical and refining facilities have been focused on component monitoring with the implementation of LDAR (Leak Detection and Repair) programs. USEPA studies have shown that the vast majority (between 80 and 90%) of fugitive emissions are associated with valve and connector leaks . While necessary, LDAR programs are, by definition, concerned with fixing leaks when they are encountered, not preventing them. Further, it could be argued that the greatest contribution to lowering fugitive emission rates from connectors and valves is through the use of consistent time-tested assembly and maintenance procedures, and the selection of the best available technology in terms of lowest emission valve packings, gaskets, torqueing equipment, and other equipment. An overview of best practices for achieving lowest fugitive emission rates for bolted flange connectors and valves including a fugitive emissions model for gasketed connectors will be presented.

Optical Flow Sensors for Environmental Compliance and Process Control

Donn Williams - , Optical Scientific

Description

OSI's Optical Flow Sensor (OFS) can help you comply with EPA’s Organic Liquids Distribution MACT, RSR and Ja regulations. Unaffected by temperature, pressure, density or gas concentration, OFS makes drift-free flow measurements on flare stacks, thermal oxidizers and a host of similar routine and extreme processes alike with no shutdown needed to install.

Optical Gas Imaging

William Schwahn - Instructor, FLIR Systems

Description

Coming soon.

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Optical Gas Imaging: Examining Detection Limit and the Resulting Impact on Emissions Inventory

Jon Morris - CTO, Providence Photonics

Description

Optical Gas Imaging (OGI) has been widely used for detecting gas leaks from process equipment. However, the detection limit of an OGI camera has been an elusive performance metric and has not been systematically characterized and quantified. A substantial body of research has been performed that has shed some light on the OGI detection limits and the factors that dictate the detection limits. The OGI detection limit expressed as ppm-m can be calculated at a pixel level as a function of ΔT (differential temperature between the gas plume and the background), the OGI camera type, and the specific gas in question. Furthermore, the OGI detection limit expressed as a minimum mass leak rate (e.g., grams per hour -denoted DLgph) can be calculated based on the ΔT and the distance from the OGI camera to the leak location. With an OGI DLgph expressed as a function of ΔT and distance, an OGI leak survey protocol can be established that will provide operators a flexibility of using the most suitable combination of ΔT and distance in the field to achieve the same minimum detection limit. A numerically defined OGI detection limit will enable establishment of an emission factor for “non-detects” in a Leak Detection And Repair (LDAR) program. The contribution of the non-detects can be a significant contributor to the total fugitive emissions in an emission inventory due to the overwhelming number of components in the non-detect category. If a higher DLgph is adopted in a leak survey protocol, the emission factor for the non-detects will be higher, and vice versa. If desired, a DLgph value can be mapped to a “leak definition” in a conventional LDAR program, providing a transition from a Method 21 based LDAR program to an OGI based LDAR program for more efficient management of fugitive emissions.

Optical Gas Imaging: From Handheld to Autonomous

Craig O’Neill and Chris Beadle - , FLIR & IntelliView Technologies

Description

Optical gas imaging (OGI) has been a part of leak detection and repair for over a decade. From starting as a handheld solution to ensure safe work practices in the oil and gas industry to becoming the best system of emissions reduction (BSER) as defined by the EPA in US methane detection regulations, OGI has become a foundation of the oil and gas industry for emissions mitigation. One recent key advancement of OGI is the introduction of uncooled solutions for this technology. Uncooled OGI solutions offer the oil and gas industry a lower cost, smaller solution for methane detection that can easily be utilized for continuous 24/7 monitoring. As the oil and gas industry looks for advanced solutions to streamline methane mitigation and more efficiently diagnose leaks, new fixed uncooled OGI solutions will be able to detect and identify emissions. A combination of uncooled OGI cameras from FLIR and advanced analytics from IntelliView Technologies provides the market with an anonymous and reliable solution.

Optimizing NG Compressor Station Permitting

Joel LeBlanc - General Manager, Ashworth Leininger Group

Description

This presentation puts forth a blueprint for a natural gas compressor station which maximizes compression capacity while maintaining an air emissions minor source status. The presentation will review common emissions sources, go into detail about equipment design considerations for minimizing emissions, and highlight best management practices.

Overcoming Challenges Meeting RSR Flare Monitoring Requirements

Yousheng Zeng - CEO, Providence Photonics

Description

The deadline for complying with the flare monitoring requirements under the new Refinery Sector Rule (RSR) is fast approaching (January 30, 2019). What options do you have if you are faced with the challenges meeting the compliance deadline due to unusually long lead time for instruments, turnaround scheduling, project implementation, or other technical issues? A range of possible scenarios are discussed in this presentation, including use of the Video Imaging Spectral Radiometer (VISR) method as an alternative method, and request for an extension of 1 year, 2 years, or 5 years. The discussions will also include the timing, conditions, and procedure for requesting an extension.

Overcoming Common Gas Sampling Challenges

Don Klotz - Business Development Manager, M&C Tech Group

Description

Coming soon.

Particulate Testing: Modern Solutions to Modern Limits

Justin Sullivan - Senior Project Manager, Alliance Source Testing

Description

Particulate matter (PM) with diameters less than 10 and 2.5 micrometers pose a significant health risk to local communities. Because of this, regulations regarding PM 10 and PM 2.5 are ever increasing. The methodology used to test for PM is advancing to meet the needs of modern standards. Other Test Method (OTM) 37 offers a superior approach to PM testing as compared to traditional sampling techniques. This discussion will take an in depth look at several side by side comparisons of data from OTM 37 and traditional sampling methods. Topics discussed will include reduced test time, greater analytical sensitivity, and decreased bias from interferents.

Passive Ultrasonic Imaging: a novel LDAR tool for gas leak detection and quantification

Florian Perrodin - CEO, Distran Ltd

Description

Ultrasound as a leak detection method in Oil & Gas has been used with little success in the past due to its time consuming nature, and the heavy training requirements. Instead of using a single microphone, novel devices such as Distran Ultra Pro have a microphone array that produces acoustic pictures instead of playing sound like previous devices. Overlaid with an optical image in real-time, the user is able to instantly pinpoints the leaks in a radius of 30 feet. The technique allows additionally to quantify leakages rate in real-time. Advantages and limits of the technique will be presented.

Permian Basin Environmental Success Story: Revenue Sharing with Vent Gas

Jeff Voorhis - Engineer, Hy-Bon Engineering

Description

Lower crude oil and natural gas prices have made it more challenging for O&G operations to justify spending capital on the capture and reselling of vent gas. The lack of options on the spending capital have lead companies to flare or release to the atmosphere a valuable resource that could easily pay for the expense of the capture equipment.

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Permitting for a Successful LDAR Program

Brandon Mogan - , Tora Consulting, LLC

Description

Leak Detection and Repair (LDAR) is often an afterthought during the permitting phase of a project. Common issues include: underestimated counts of fugitive emission components (valves, flanges, etc.), application of LDAR program reduction efficiencies to components that aren’t monitored, overgeneralized stream compositions, and lack of design team knowledge with respect to LDAR requirements. Failure to address these issues can result in significant penalties, underscored by numerous consent decrees issued by EPA over the past few years. The presentation will discuss best practices to address these common issues based experience with permitting and LDAR program implementation at various facilities in the US.

PFAS - Analysis and Data Quality

David Gratson - Senior Technical Chemist, Environmental Standards

Description

Following on the PFAS Primer presentation, this talk will outline the challenges with the analysis of PFAS substances. Research laboratories have been identified hundreds of PFAS analogs and telomers in ground and drinking water. Yet, the EPA, DOD, and ASTM published methods account for only a small subset of potential PFAS chemicals of concern at any particular site. In addition, the published EPA method (537, ver. 1.1) was prepared for drinking water matrix, yet it has been modified by most laboratories and extended to general ground water, surface water, as well as soils/sediments. Significant differences have been identified in how the commercial laboratory community has modified this method. The presenter will provide an overview on the analytical methods for PFASs with focus on the use of LC/MS-MS. Method details and how they can impact data quality and comparability will be described.

PFAS Management: What should you focus on now?

Andrew Pawlisz - , Trihydro

Description

Description coming soon.

Photochemical Modeling for Ozone Inter-Precursor Trading

Qi Zhang - Senior Air Quality Engineer, GHD Services

Description

In a typical ozone Nonattainment New Source Review (NNSR) project, one requirement is to offset the project emissions of the ozone precursor (nitrogen oxides [NOx] or volatile organic compounds [VOCs]) with emissions reduction credits (ERCs) obtained from a source within the nonattainment area. As allowed by many state agencies, sometimes permit applicants choose to offset one ozone precursor with another precursor for various reasons, primary due to the ERCs for one precursor being unavailable or too expensive. To support this inter-precursor trading, state agencies and the United States Environmental Protection Agency (US EPA) require a photochemical grid modeling analysis to demonstrate the inter-precursor trading will not adversely affect the area’s attainment demonstration.

Pipeline Blowdowns and Distribution

Doug Sahm - , TPE Midstream

Description

Coming soon.

Pipeline Jurisdiction Analysis: A Look Inside Plant Facility Fencelines

Bruce Beighle - Partner, Integrity Solutions

Description

The purpose of a “jurisdiction analysis” is to evaluate and justify the applicability of federal and state pipeline safety regulations for gas and hazardous liquid pipeline segments and associated facilities. Pipelines within “complex facilities” can be subject to U.S. DOT PHMSA, DHS USCG, OSHA and/or EPA regulations, so a plant operator’s first step towards compliance is to correctly delineate agency jurisdiction limits and identify applicable regulations. Recently federal and state pipeline safety inspectors are looking inside the fence line of storage facilities, transportation facilities and plant facilities connected to regulated pipelines and asking operators to justify the connected facilities as being exempt. Significant changes and interpretations related to 49 CFR Parts 192 and 195 pipeline jurisdiction applicability criteria have been made by DOT PHMSA, often resulting in confusion and misapplication by plant operators.

Plant Turnaround Unit Flare Minimization Vapor Control Strategies

Paul Anderson & Chris Longo - , GEM, An Evergreen North America Company

Description

Turnarounds are one of the most anticipated and time intensive events in a plant’s cycle. Turnarounds are an essential part of continuous operations in the refining and petrochemical industries. They provide an important window of opportunity for essential maintenance tasks, and they also allow equipment to safely and efficiently be replaced or serviced, meeting regulatory requirements. If done correctly, they can potentially lead to huge gains in the facility’s productivity and output. However, turnarounds are also extremely costly events. If the budget balloons or the timeline unexpectedly expands, it can have disastrous effects on a company’s bottom line. Numerous facility turnarounds are being impacted by increasing environmental restrictions driven by the evolution of new federal EPA standards, MSS Regulatory Compliance and Refinery Sector Rules. Over the past 5 years, GEM has taken a comprehensive approach developing environmental vapor control strategies that are integrated into the operational shutdown procedures that are mitigating safety risks, eliminating environmental bottlenecks, shortening the shutdown sequence and increasing reliability of schedule, all while meeting environmental regulatory requirements. Our vapor control strategy during shutdown allows for flare-less shutdown capability, eliminating the flare systems as primary destruction sources, as well as providing continuous environmental compliance, monitoring, data recording, and final compliance reporting documentation. GEM also provides vapor processing that mitigates problematic process variables and compounds that exist during the shutdown and cleaning process, prior to introduction into a facility’s flare gas recovery unit or flare system. The vapor control processes include thermal vapor destruction, liquid scrubbing, carbon adsorption, heat exchanger cooling and condensing, condensate removal, as well as pressure and temperature control. These vapor control processes can be integrated into the facility shutdown plan and regulatory compliance program. These vapor control strategies are being successfully integrated into turnaround planning and serve as best practice for facilities recently challenged with meeting new environmental regulations associated with turnaround activities.

Portable GC for Fenceline Monitoring

Chris Schepcoff - , SGS Galson

Description

Coming soon.

Potential Impacts of Recent U.S. EPA Region 6 Guidance on CMS Downtime and Data Calculation

Eric Swisher - Technical Manager, All4 Inc.

Description

In June of 2017, U.S. EPA Region 6 issued guidance in response to a written inquiry from Oklahoma Department of Environmental Quality (ODEQ) that provides an interpretation for the reporting of downtime for continuous monitoring system (CMS) and the process by which hourly averages are calculated for purposes of demonstrating compliance with an emission standard. The interpretation of U.S. EPA Region 6 differs from the widely accepted practice currently utilized by many facilities. This presentation will focus on the specifics of the guidance, impacts on current (and past) compliance demonstrations, actions currently in process to seek further clarification of the guidance, and the recent developments in the application of the guidance by regulatory agencies.

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Preparing for the Storm? Next Year’s Public Posting of Benzene Fenceline Data from Refineries

Heather Palmer & Byron Taylor - Partner, Sidley Austin, LLP

Description

This session will focus on the rise of “non-standard” enforcement actions against refineries and chemical facilities in the U.S. based on air quality modeling and limited ambient monitoring. We will explore how government agencies and private parties are now relying on data collected through Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS) assessments, National Air Toxics Assessments (NATA) results and/or Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (ATSDR) health consultation letters to initiate enforcement actions and class action lawsuits. We will also discuss how the public posting of benzene fenceline data from refineries could further accelerate this emerging trend.

Preventing Contamination During Field Sampling

Dennis Leeke - , Pace Analytical Laboratory

Description

Description coming soon.

Process Burner Flames: The Good, the Bad, and The Ugly

Description

John Zink Hamworthy Combustion field personnel inspect thousands of burners each year. Too often those flames are not only bad but sometimes potentially dangerous. There are a number of conditions needed for good flames. Burners should be operating at or near their design conditions which includes the excess air and draft levels, and the design firing rate (fuel pressure) and fuel composition. The combustion air must be properly distributed, the fuel must be clean, and both the air and fuel must be properly controlled. The burner and its associated equipment (e.g., tile and pilot) must also be properly installed and maintained. There are some visual indicators that should be checked for proper burner operation. These include uniformity (all flames in a given heater should normally look about the same), proper flame color, no leaning between flames or into process tubes, no pronounced hot spots or dark spots on the burner tiles, no irregular flame movement (e.g., no pulsing), and no unusual sounds (e.g., flashback). Bad flames can lead to increased pollution emissions, reduced thermal efficiency, and unplanned shutdowns. Common reasons for bad flames include improper burner maintenance and operation. Dirty fuel is particularly problematic as it can cause fuel injectors to plug which can create multiple problems. Ugly flames can be dangerous and need to be corrected as soon as possible. Examples of these irregular flames include flame impingement, huffing or pulsing, or severely lifted flames. The purpose of this presentation is to discuss proper burner operation and what good flames look like and then to contrast that with lots of examples of improper burner operation including the causes and corrections. This information can be used in the risk-based inspection and performance monitoring processes. Typically, equipment has a function statement (primary/secondary) and performance objectives and ranges. The consequences when the function of the equipment has failed is documented in the earlier processes.

PSM 101

Katherine Culbert - CEO, K and K Process

Description

Are you new to Process Safety? Do you find yourself wondering what all the acronyms stand for? Have you wondered why we have Process Safety? This presentation will review where Process Safety came from, what the Process Safety Management regulation means, and how Process Safety applies in today’s climate. We will also illustrate how OSHA’s PSM and EPA’s Risk Management Program work together to provide a full-plant solution. You will leave with the ability to better communicate with others in the industry by understanding the history and terminology and you will be able to impress your friends by talking in full acronym sentences.

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Quadcopter Drones, Fixed Wing Drone, Helicopters, or Fixed Wing Plane?

David Furry - , Leak Surveys Inc.

Description

Coming soon.

Real-Time Analysis of Stack Gases

Koji Ishikawa - , Horiba

Description

The ENDA-7000 stack gas analyzer system designed to continuously measure the concentrations of nitrogen oxides (NOx), sulfur dioxide (SO2), carbon monoxide (CO), carbon dioxide (CO2), oxygen (O2), and ammonia (NH3) in stack flue gas streams. The ENDA-7000 series integral sample conditioning system ensures sample integrity for accurate measurements. The ENDA-7000 is based upon the HORIBA GH-700 series multi-channel analyzer is capable of measuring up to six different combustion gases simultaneously. Using a modular design, Chemiluminescence, non-dispersive infrared, non-dispersive ultraviolet and magneto-pneumatic modules are configured for the necessary measurements. The presentation will discuss the use of multi-gas analyzer technology to accurately measure components by minimize baseline drift, automate system operations, while being compliant for USEPA 40 CFR 40/60/75

Realtime Flare Gas Monitoring with Mass Spectrometer

Charles deCarlo - Marketing Manager, Extrel CMS LLC

Description

As refineries continue to optimize their approach RSR 63.670 compliance, new regulations for flare emissions are set to hit a broad range of industries over the next five years. The goal is to ensure the destruction of Hazardous Air Pollutants (HAPs) prior to release into the atmosphere, but drastic changes in vent gas composition make controlling that efficiency difficult. Getting the full composition of the vent gas quickly allows operations to apply corrections as soon as possible. Flare gas mass spectrometers measure hydrocarbons, carbon oxides, hydrogen, sulfurs, moisture and various volatile organics, and report concentrations and Net Heating Value (NHV) to the control system in seconds. Examples from recent ethylene flare gas regulations and MON sites will be covered in the discussion, along with data from oil refinery flare events.

Realtime PRV Leak Detection and Process Data Analysis for Environmental, Occupational and Process Safety Management

Marcelo Dultra & Marcio Donnangelo - , Emerson Automation Solutions

Description

20% of PRVs in a typical operation are potentially leaking. Undetected and therefore not reported PRV releases occur more often than operators realize and are one of the major causes to compromise valve sealing integrity. PRVs are the last line of defense against process overpressure and it is critical that all releases be reported and recorded for process safety root cause analysis, including near miss safety events. Join this session with Anderson Greenwood Crosby PRV team to discuss wireless monitoring solutions that enable operators to correlate real time PRV information with process data and maintenance records to improve environmental, occupational and process safety management.

Reduce Turnaround Loading of H2S to the Flare and FGR Utilizing New Scrubber Technology

Jim Woodard & Jace Bigler - Business Development Manager and Chemical Engineer, Vapor Point, LLC

Description

Refineries are looking for alternative technologies to flares that can provide flexibility during various operations and maintenance activities. During unit shutdowns and turnarounds, there may be periods that the refinery Flare Gas Recovery System capacity can be challenged. The Vapor Point Scrubber system was utilized to ensure compliance with permit limits for H2S and SO2 emissions by scrubbing sour flare gases. Vapor Point has developed processes to aid the refining market with meeting the new compliance requirements while maintaining operational efficiencies. Vapor Point applies high efficiency liquid scrubbing systems to remove VOC, H2S, and other HAPS during different phases of unit decontamination. Specially designed temporary vessels for liquid and vapor phase product management have also been developed and are key elements in some applications. The vapor phase emission control systems and specially designed process vessels have met the needs of the refining industry with numerous field implementations.

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Reducing Well Pad Air Emissions

Jeffrey Wilson - Director of Product Management, EcoVapors Recovery Systems

Description

The U.S. EPA promulgated Clean Air Act regulations for upstream oil and gas facilities initially in 2011. While these regulations have been amended and expanded on several occasions to cover a variety of sources, emission data from upstream oil and gas facilities indicate that vapor resulting from the pressure drop from separation represents the largest single source of VOCs. Initial focus was on controlling or destroying the VOCs, although recovery of the rich gas is also a potential source of additional profit. The presentation compares and contrasts several of the standard methods for addressing these emissions from atmospheric storage and presents new technology for optimizing profitability while significantly reducing emissions and flaring. The effectiveness of reducing emissions of criteria pollutants as well as greenhouse gas emissions is also contrasted.

Refinery Flares Roundup - Lessons Learned doing Recent Flare Projects

Herman Holm - Director, Environmental Services, Spectrum Environmental Solutions, LLC

Description

The RSR refinery flare rule is now in full effect. It’s true that every flare is unique, and there are multiple paths to compliance, particularly when it comes to the instrumentation, controls, and compliance approaches. After the installation of the flow meters, control valves, and an analyzer, many find themselves swimming in a sea of control options. There are several potential paths forward to consider, and each has the objective of managing steam and supplemental gas addition in a fashion that minimizes cost. The RSR only specifies the calculations used to demonstrate compliance and makes no reference to the specific control techniques required to achieve said compliance. It will be up to each facility to determine the optimal control technique for each of their flares. A review of several control options, the documentation of the control systems, and data management techniques will be provided to help in achieving both flare control and demonstrating future compliance.

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Refinery Sector Rule - Top 10 Lessons Learned

Andy Shurtleff - Market Manager- Refining and Petrochemicals , Airgas

Description

Description coming soon.

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Regulatory Outlook Under the Remaining Term of the Trump Administration

Shannon Broome - Partner/Office Managing Partner, San Francisco , Hunton Andrews Kurth LLP

Description

Coming soon.

Reporting of Component and System IDs During Missing Data Periods

Brian Fowler - , Environmental Systems Corporation

Description

As part of EPA’s ongoing efforts to improve both the quality of reported emissions data and streamline the reporting process itself, EPA has identified several issues with respect to the tracking of unit/stack operating hours and required QA. To correct these issues, the 2019 Q3 ECMPS release will include several updates to improve the accuracy of emissions evaluations, reduce the number of incorrect errors and/or messages, and result in an overall more efficient reporting process with better data quality. All new related check results will be informational messages. EPA will monitor these results and change the severity of the error messages to Critical Level 1 in the future.

Residual Assessment for Oil and Gas for Potential Reuse

Robert Reimers, Ph.D. - Director of Asepticys, Inc, President of Paradigm International, Inc. and Adjunct Professor , Tulane University

Description

This presentation will elucidate the approach to assess oil and gas residuals. These residuals can fall into three categories, (1) hazardous wastes, (2) solid waste or (3) a residual that is outside the solid waste arena. The testing runs through three tiers of testing: 1. Alert level assessment (bulk density criteria) 2. Extraction testing (availability to environmental release) 3. Impact on biological organisms or biological processing. All these tiers relate to human health and environmental impact. The testing will be elucidated with various examples.

Results of Flare Remote Monitoring Test Sponsored by PERF

Yousheng Zeng - CEO, Providence Photonics

Description

The Petroleum Environmental Research Forum (PERF) sponsored a comprehensive blind test of flare remote monitoring technologies. The test protocol included extractive sampling as a control method and invited four organizations to test their respective technologies to remotely measure the performance of an elevated industrial flare. The test was conducted at the research and test facility of John Zink Hamworthy Combustion (JZHC) in Tulsa, Oklahoma from October 17th to 27th of 2016 and was administered by JZHC.. A wide range of flare operating conditions and environmental conditions were tested, including various fuel gas compositions, fuel gas flow rates, and steam flow rates, and NHVCZ levels. Providence Photonics’ Video Imaging Spectral Radiometer (VISR) was one of the four technologies tested. This presentation describes the range of test conditions and the blind test results for the VISR method.

Review of Best Practices for Selection, Installation, Operation and Maintenance of Gas Meters for Flare Applications Used for Managing Facility Mass Balance and Compliance

Arnold Rivas-Griswold - Regional Manager North America, Fluenta Inc.

Description

Coming soon.

Right of Way Using Drones

Peter Walper - , Texas Energy Raters

Description

Coming soon.

RMP Litigation and Enforcement Update – Will the Amendments Survive?

Justin Savage & Tim Webster - Partners, Sidley Austin, LLP

Description

This session will focus on the compliance strategies for addressing developments in the RMP regulations, including whether the RMP Amendments will survive anticipated litigation. Other topics of discussion will include EPA enforcement, Title V, and citizen suits.

RSR - Lessons Learned - Calibration Gases

Andy Shurtleff - , Airgas, Inc.

Description

Description coming soon.

RTR Update

Steve Smith - , LyondellBassell

Description

EPA is proposing multiple Risk and Technology (RTR) rules in 2019 that will affect the chemical and petrochemical industries, including the National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAP) for Miscellaneous Organic Chemical Manufacturing (MON), Organic Liquids Distribution (OLD), Ethylene Production, and Stationary Combustion Turbines. This presentation will review changes EPA is proposing to make to various NESHAP as a result of their risk reviews, technology reviews, or in response to past court decisions. These changes affect startup and shutdown, stringency of the standards, maintenance procedures, monitoring, and reporting. We will highlight proposed changes that are similar to the Refinery Sector Rule, changes that increase stringency of standards for ethylene oxide emission sources, and where various chemical and petrochemical sector rules will now have slightly different requirements. The presentation will also discuss industry comments submitted to EPA on the major proposed changes.

Safety as a Customer Service: Effective Communication for the Safety Professional

Daniel Boreman - HSSE Director, EMSI

Description

The saying goes, "it’s not what you say but how you say it". In this presentation we will explore some effective communication techniques for both delivering and receiving information in safety, work and even at home. We will discuss how a few customer service experiences, both good and bad, helped the presenter to redefine and improve his approach to positive and effective communication.

Safety Showers and Location Awareness - Improving Safety with Wireless Monitoring

Marcio Donnangelo - Global Business Development Manager, Emerson Automation Solutions

Description

Think you’re covered? Radios aren’t always enough. Find out how to improve safety by monitoring safety shower and eye–wash stations, as well as comply with OSHA without incurring complex installation and deployment costs. A safety shower system integration using wireless technology is not only cost–effective but can provide instant alerts and quick and effective response time.

Safety's Competitive Advantage and the Future of the Safety, Health, and Environmental Profession - Colin Brown - Board of Certified Safety Professionals

Colin Brown - , Board of Certified Safety Professionals

Description

Compliance with state and federal regulations is the absolute minimum and does not ensure the safety and health of workers. Safety and health in today's dynamic industry space must no longer be defined as the absence of harm and death. How do you turn safety into a competitive advantage, and what does the future hold for the profession entrusted with employee and customer well-being? This presentation highlights how professional development through accredited certification can change organizational culture and drive results through SH&E leadership. Learning Objectives Upon completion, the participant will be able to: Describe why compliance is not enough to reduce injuries and loss in construction. Recognize at least three ways that safety makes a company competitive. Leverage training and certification to drive higher levels of safety and productivity. Show how H&S is important not only for workers but also for front-line supervisors and executives.

Same Road; Different Trees

Daniel Boreman - , Emission Monitoring Service, Inc. (EMSI)

Description

In an environment where so much emphasis is placed on safety, it is easy for workers to lose sight of who is truly responsible for individual safety. Complacency is arguably one of the biggest hazards faced by LDAR monitoring technicians in the field environment. This presentation highlights just how easy it is, even with the best intentions, to become complacent and offers some techniques to get workers re-focused and combat complacency.

Satellite-based Hyperspectral Analysis for Emissions Detection, Integrity Monitoring and Compliance

Peter Weaver - , Orbital Sidekick

Description

Analysis of hyperspectral imagery (HSI), collected by micro-satellite, is poised to provide unparalleled global daily leak and emissions detection capability for the chemical, oil and gas industries. Space-based HSI offers an ability to directly find leaks, detect threatening construction activity, identify physical changes to soil and vegetation caused by leaked product, and even distinguish between specific hydrocarbon liquids or vapors. In this presentation, OSK will discuss the state-of-the-art for using HSI to detect fugitive emissions. It will provide examples of inspection findings using Spectral IntelligenceTM. And, it will provide insight on how HSI can improve the operator’s ability to cost-effectively understand the conditions at and around their assets.

Satisfying RSR at Turndown - Clayton Francis - Zeeco, Inc.

Clayton Francis - Application Manager, Zeeco, Inc.

Description

Nothing in plants must turn down like a flare. Lots of equipment achieve turndown rates 10:1, sophisticated transmitters might reach 1,000:1, yet a refinery flare can turn down 100,000:1. With the new rules applied, operators are experiencing unacceptable flame quality in this low range. Join a discussion on how those shortcomings were overcome.

Selecting the Most Cost-Effective Technologies for PFAS Treatment

Description

Since 2014, The United States Air Force Civil Engineering Center (AFCEC) has been conducting on-going response activities to remediate groundwater impacted by poly- and perfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS) at the former Pease Air Force Base in Portsmouth, New Hampshire. AFCEC’s response included the installation and operation of a full-scale regenerable ion exchange (IX) resin system to remediate groundwater in the source area impacted by years of firefighting training activities. The resin system was selected based on the results of a comprehensive pilot test that evaluated and compared the effectiveness of multiple treatment technologies. In parallel, PFAS contamination was detected at elevated levels in the City of Portsmouth (City) public water supply in 2014. The Haven water supply well, located on the Pease Tradeport, was immediately shut down by the City. The source of PFAS contamination was traced back to the historical use of firefighting foam at the nearby Pease Air Force Base. A SORBIX RePURE regenerable resin system was installed to meet the primary source area remediation objective of treating the groundwater PFOS+PFOA concentration to below the 0.07 µg/l Health Advisory Level. Design, installation and startup of the full-scale SORBIX system was completed from fall 2017 to spring 2018. Based on the successful application of ion exchange resin at the former fire training area, The City decided to run a pilot test to evaluate the effectiveness of single-use IX resin versus bituminous Granular Activated Carbon (GAC). The pilot system was designed and fabricated to pump directly from the Haven Well and facilitated comparison of the two technologies at four different empty bed contact times (EBCTs); 2.5, 5, 7.5 and 10 minutes. The full-scale source area regenerable resin PFAS remediation system has successfully treated groundwater with a total influent average PFAS concentration of 48 µg/l since April 2018. The treated water quality from the SORBIX RePURE resin system has been consistently non-detect for PFOS+PFOA compounds, readily achieving compliance with the 0.07 µg/l HAL target. Operational modifications have been made to address and correct minor challenges with the resin regeneration system, and regenerant recovery and related waste minimization processes have proven highly effective. No PFAS waste has needed to be hauled off site after more than 16 months of operation. The IX resin results were similarly successful in the City’s public water supply pilot test. The influent total PFAS concentration averaged 3.5 µg/l over the course of the year-long evaluation. The IX resin substantially outperformed the GAC on all 12 PFAS that were present at detectable levels. The GAC column was operated until PFOA+PFOS breakthrough reached 0.07 µg/l at the 10-minute EBCT. This occurred at approximately 13,000 bed volumes (BVs), roughly 2.5 months into the test. By contrast, the IX resin effluent from the shortest (2.5-minute) EBCT column remained well below the 0.07 µg/l HAL, even after treating more than 171,000 BVs over a 12-month period. Based on the results of the comparative pilot test, the City selected IX resin for full-scale implementation to remove PFAS from the Haven water supply. The City’s engineer, Weston & Sampson, led the evaluation and attributed the selection of IX resin to the smaller footprint and lower capital and O&M costs associated with the technology. The full-scale system is scheduled to commence operation in 2020.

SPOD: Continuous VOC Monitoring for Targeted Grab Sample Acquisition

Jacob Melby - , SENSIT Technologies

Description

The SENSIT® SPOD is solar-powered fenceline monitoring system for VOCs. This low-powered, easily deployable system combines wind and VOC measurements to identify and locate emission sources in real-time. When combined with the highly configurable sample acquisition system, the SENSIT SPOD can enable targeted grab sampling using evacuated canisters or sorption tubes for later laboratory VOC analysis.

Strategic Permitting in a Sustainable World

Bart Leininger - Principal, Ashworth Leininger Group

Description

The National Emission Standard for Benzene Waste Operations (BWON or Subpart FF) is a complex regulation that is difficult to assess in the context of a due diligence assessment. These assessments are conducted within compressed schedules, essential documentation is typically limited or unavailable, and the liabilities for non-compliance are significant. Given the complexity of the BWON regulation, even a seasoned practitioner can miss a significant compliance issue, which could result in a costly corrective actions and potential enforcement exposure for a new owner. Further complicating the due diligence are Subpart FF enhanced requirements mandated in Consent Decrees. Assessing compliance with these enhanced requirements is just as important as compliance with the regulation itself.Given this complex backdrop, the Subpart FF assessment during a due diligence must have a laser focus on those requirements of most importance for the acquisition. This presentation draws upon the presenter’s experience in performing detailed Subpart FF assessments in the context of a due diligence and from litigation related to BWON compliance. The presentation uses case study examples to illustrate key areas of inquiry that should be part of the assessment, and provides helpful and practical recommendations for evaluating key aspects of a Subpart FF compliance program. This presentation will also be of interest to BWON professionals with ongoing operations as it provides a “mental checklist” of areas of potential exposure in their BWON compliance program.

Taking Advantage of the Audit Privilege When Performing EH&S Compliance Assessments

Joel LeBlanc, P.E. - , Ashworth Leininger Group (ALG)

Description

In recent months, the Oklahoma Department of Environmental Quality made effective the Oklahoma Environmental, Health and Safety Audit Privilege Act, which is available to aircraft manufacturing, chemicals, oil and gas processing, plastics, cement, food and meat processing, and paper products. This is a continuation of a national trend towards immunity from civil and administrative penalties for regulated entities that perform voluntary EHS audits and then remedy and disclose any discovered violations. This presentation will discuss which certain key requirements that must be met to qualify for immunity and compare Oklahoma’s Audit Privilege Act to the 2017 revision of the Texas Act.

Taking LDAR QAQC to the Next Level Using Technology

Derrick Mauk - Director of Quality and Training, Bureau Veritas

Description

1. Evolution of QAQC in LDAR a. Timeline of LDAR Program QAQC b. How basic QAQC was “Good Enough” c. When did QAQC begin to build d. Consent Decree Requirements stepped up QAQC e. Where do we go in the future 2. Monitoring Technology a. Technician has more info in the field b. Monitoring software and how it helps build quality 3. Field Auditing Technology a. Tools b. Processes 4. Database QAQC Technology a. Outside databases and tools used in QAQC b. Reporting on QAQC 5. Data Trending and how it helps QAQC a. What data do we look at b. How much data do we look at 6. Accountability a. What do we do with QAQC data b. Who do we share the data with c. How do we coach using the data 7. Increasing QAQC as we move forward a. Doing more than the minimum 8. As we move forward a. What does the future look like in LDAR QAQC b. How do we get there c. What do the results look like d. Who benefits

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Tanks Enforcement Update

Kosta Loukeris - Environmental Engineer, EPA

Description

This presentation will provide an overview of some of EPA’s recent enforcement cases and compliance monitoring activities at gasoline terminals, chemical plants, and other types of facilities. The discussion will include field inspectors’ observations and areas of focus for improving operational best practices.

Texas Ozone Nonattainment Area Reclassification & Potential Implications on Your Operations

Kristin Gordon - Houston Office Director, ALL4 Inc.

Description

In ALL4’s presentation, we will discuss the September 23, 2019 USEPA reclassification of the Houston-Galveston-Brazoria (HGB) and Dallas-Fort Worth (DFW) nonattainment areas to serious nonattainment for the 2008 eight-hour ozone NAAQS. We will share the potential impacts on facilities located in the HGB and DFW areas including but not limited to: - Updates to major source nitrogen oxides (NOx) and volatile organic compounds (VOC) potential to emit (PTE) thresholds; - Construction and operating permits implications (New Source Review and Title V Operating Permits); - Permit by Rule (PBR) and Standard Permit authorization registration and/or certification of emissions via E-permitting mechanism; and - Timeline for demonstrating compliance.

The AIHR Shark Offers a Uniquely Innovative Approach for You to Get Into and Stay in Compliance for Your Air Monitoring Programs

Chris Schepcoff - Business Development Manager , SGS Galson Laboratories, Inc.

Description

The AIHR Shark is a directional passive air quality sampler that hunts fugitive emissions caused by activity from petroleum refineries, chemical facilities, or off-site sources. The shark-shaped samplers provide a unique flow through design and wind vane allowing for the air flow to be directed onto one of 12 passive sample media, all at a fixed 30 degree rotation, collecting low-level VOCs to be analyzed for benzene only or a full list of volatiles allowing for forensic fingerprinting of sources. These targeted, efficient, and affordable monitors are easily deployable, low maintenance, do not require a power source, and can pinpoint the direction of pollution sources utilizing truer wind direction as compared to regional wind data.

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The Brave New World of Renewable Fuels Projects – A Permitting Perspective

Bart Leininger, P.E. - , Ashworth Leininger Group (ALG)

Description

More and more facilities are considering projects to add renewable fuel sources to their mix of product offerings. Some of these projects are mandated by federal and state laws; other projects are pursued to take advantage of the tax and other credits available for producers of low carbon fuels. Renewable fuels projects have introduced a host of permitting issues, many of which are not understood by local and state regulators. This presentation provides helpful insights on the permitting process, and provides recommendations to streamline the process. The presentation leverages experiences in permitting a variety of renewable fuels projects.

The Dirty Dozen: Our Worst CEM Field Stories of 2018

Don Klotz - Business Development Manager, M&C Tech Group

Description

A glimpse into both common, and unique CEM challenges which hinder refinery, petrochemical and chemical compliance. From the sample extraction point, to the vents of the analyzers, every inch of the CEM sample path can cause major problems with data capture and compliance. This presentation will benefit both skilled, and novice, CEM technicians, managers and supervisors by reviewing detailed accounts of CEM downtime, and the symptoms and solutions associated with each issue.

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The Evolution of Optical Gas Imaging

Description

From its inception nearly 15 years ago, Optical Gas Imaging (OGI) has steadily evolved from being classified as a little-known emerging technology to now being a well-understood and accepted fugitive emission solution. OGI has advanced beyond the classification of “alternative” regulatory technology to being widely accepted and regarded as one of the most cost-effective approaches for leak detection. OGI is even listed as a Best System for Emissions Reduction (BSER) in the 2016 NSPS OOOOa regulation. True cost-effectiveness has been shown in OGI’s ability to safely inspect difficult to monitor components, which have historically added to inspection man-hours and equipment expense, such as those required to build scaffolding or use personnel lift equipment. OGI has also been shown to reduce costs by allowing more components to be inspected in a shorter amount of time, effectively helping to find the larger (long-tail) leaks faster. Once known only as a qualitative leak detection technique, OGI can now quantify leaks via Quantitative Optical Gas Imaging (qOGI) analysis which further simplifies the visualization and measurement of gas emissions. Newer, lower-cost OGI detectors now allow for cost-effective continuous, autonomous leak detection complete with alarming and recording capabilities. Other advancements in OGI detectors have reduced power requirements which allow them to be used in UAV payloads where miles of pipe or other difficult to monitor components and equipment can be quickly and safely inspected. This paper will give more detail and insight into the progression and evolution of this exciting technology.

The Forecast for Your LDAR Program Looks Cloudy, and Why That’s a Good Thing

Christopher Tucker - , InspectionLogic Corporation

Description

InspectionLogic has worked hard to move LDAR to a cloud based solution. We have learned a ton along the way and the benefits for everyone involved are huge! Come learn why moving your LDAR program to the cloud is a good thing and how it will benefit you, your facility, and your technicians. Topics will include data security, data accessibility, and what an “always connected” handset really means for LDAR technicians.

The Future Technology of LDAR

Joshua Pinter - Product Manager, CNTRAL Inc.

Description

In this presentation we will go over the current state of LDAR technology, including both hardware and software, and showcase emerging technologies that will dramatically shape the future workflows and efficiencies of the LDAR industry. From new mobile devices that allow for far more functionality than past generations to brand new technology that is still 2 - 5 years away from reaching mainstream, such as augmented reality. This presentation is aimed to not only get people prepared for the future and how our workflows will change but also to get people excited about the future of LDAR and the advancements that are coming, including heads up displays so you can have both hands free to monitor.

The LNG Bridge

Joan Fontaine - VP/Energy Services, Sanborn, Head & Associates Inc.

Description

Natural gas has been called a “bridge” fuel by those who foresee a transition to renewable energy, but the bridge may be lengthy given the plentiful reserve supply that has been identified. Natural gas production continues to increase, making new uses of natural gas attractive. New natural gas infrastructure has not necessarily kept pace, and markets for natural gas are ripe for development. Liquefied Natural Gas (LNG) provides opportunities for greater use, allowing natural gas to reach customers that currently do not have pipeline access or can benefit from a backup supply at times of seasonal gas shortage. This presentation will focus on successful LNG applications that have provided energy and economic security to industries and institutions. Example case studies will include LNG installations at: 1) a gas-fired power plant to supply gas during seasonal shortages, 2) an industry with large boilers that was able to substitute gas for heating oil, and 3) a university in the northeast that could maintain its supply of gas for campus heating during winter gas shortages.

The Path to Equivalency

Kristine Bennett - , CSU METEC

Description

The Evaluation of Innovative Methane Detection Technologies summarizes the technical-regulatory guidance document of the same title published by the Interstate Technology & Regulatory Council (ITRC) in September 2018 (https://methane-1.itrcweb.org/). Over the last number of years, several state, national and international governments have passed or are considering methane emission regulations related to oil and natural gas production and distribution. Historically, gas detection technologies used to regulate fugitive emissions in the oil and gas sector had to comply with EPA’s Method 21 requirements. With the advent of optical gas imaging (OGI) technologies, EPA established an alternative work practice (AWP) to allow inclusion of manually operated infrared cameras for leak detection. EPA's amendments to the New Source Performance Standards (NSPS) on methane and volatile organic compounds (VOC) for oil and gas sources include Method 21 and OGI technologies as approved compliance methods, as well as the option for approving new leak detection technologies. Colorado and Pennsylvania allow similar options in their regulation of methane and VOC from oil and gas operations. In response, innovators are currently developing new technologies that go beyond Method 21 and OGI. However, there is no standard methodology or protocol to evaluate performance of new technologies like these as compared to Method 21 or OGI. The ITRC guidance document seeks to provide a framework for evaluating methane and VOC detection technologies for use in meeting existing and forthcoming leak regulations, assisting with inventory monitoring and reporting, and for enhancing safety. The document also identifies regulatory barriers and opportunities for new or innovative leak detection technologies. The guidance document does not purport to provide "the answer" on how to evaluate leak detection technologies, particularly in regard to determining equivalency of new technologies or methods with existing, approved technologies or methods. However, the document does provide a starting point in this ongoing challenge and discussion, which continues beyond the publication of the document and will be refined further over time, including through efforts such as the Path to Equivalency project being lead by the Methane Emissions Technology Evaluation Center (METEC) at Colorado State University, and the Canadian Environmental Protection Agency's Leak Detection Technology Equivalency framework currently under development.

The Role of Science in Developing Enhanced Oil and Gas Resources, Being Environmentally Sound, and Protecting Water Use

Davis L. Ford - President, Davis L. Ford & Associates

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The Site Remediation MACT… Is Back!

Jeremy Sell - Air and Process Services Business Unit Manager, Trihydro

Description

Personnel who may have to deal with the uncertain nature and properties of unknown chemicals at an environmental incident, hazardous waste site, industry or in a laboratory need a quick-check system to identify the actual risks and hazards they may face. This applies whether the personnel are emergency responders, forensic researchers or waste clean-up crews. There is, however, a quick-check system to identify chemical properties of labelled, unlabelled, unknown or mixed chemicals. The system uses pH paper, starch paper and a source of flame, such as a barbecue lighter or Bunsen burner. The basic test takes less than 60 seconds will identify or verify high-risk properties such as whether substances are oxidizers or reactive to heat, air or water, their range of flammability and their corrosiveness. Using the quick-check system is part of a disciplined approach to dealing with an incident involving chemicals. Safe response involves securing an area from unexpected interference, identifying safety and danger factors, assessing risks and hazards and determining the potential for an incident to escalate. Taking these measures will ensure a safe investigation and allow chemicals to be tested and representative samples of material collected for evidence without risk to human health or further damage to the environment.

The State of Fenceline Monitoring Systems Lessons from the California Experience

Randy Gibbons - Engineer, PM, Terra Applied Systems

Description

Several air quality regulating bodies in California are requiring major petroleum refiners to implement fenceline monitoring programs using open path sensing technologies. The first continuous open path Fenceline Monitoring system in California was at the Unocal Rodeo refinery (now P66) installed in 1996. This TAS system is effectively the prototype for projects currently being required at most other California refineries. Broader interest in similar fenceline systems has increased in recent years for environmental impact and general safety. The California experience provides some good examples to discuss the state of the technologies and the successful implementation of fenceline monitoring programs and systems. TAS has a unique perspective having been instrumental in creating the design and guiding implementation for most of these systems in partnerships with several refiners and local companies. Success cannot be defined or achieved without realistic purpose. Communicating purpose and building this into design before committing to engineering is often a significant obstacle. Several purposes for the California fenceline monitoring initiatives were defined in early regulation support studies. However, most of the refinery projects were being started without design purpose awareness. Technology and product readiness for these systems were not as clearly defined as regulators or even manufacturers understood. Sensor detection capabilities were overstated by operators, consultants, and some manufacturers. This led to unrealistic expectations in regulations and monitoring plans. Community attention as well as regulations requiring standards for uptime and data quality presented challenges to current products and practices. This has driven improvements in methods, equipment, and support systems. It has required manufacturers to transition products and systems from various stages of commercial readiness to address full industrial implementation. As systems come online and continuous operations are scrutinized, further developments are ongoing. Designing open path systems is not as simple as it would appear. Regulations written to operate continuously at the limits of the technology require close attention to details usually not important to refinery engineers. This often becomes a challenge. It can be aggravated in plan execution as environmental and construction challenges are often met by compromising design details. Close attention at every step of implementation is important. Most of the new experts promoting themselves in this California initiative operate in effect under a batching support and quality assurance paradigm. This is largely accepted by regulators and customers, but it carries risks. Experience with dozens of safety and operations critical open path systems, TAS brings a design paradigm of continuous operations that is well suited to the demands of operating in refinery and other heavy industry environments.

The Transformation of LDAR: Predictive Leak Management Software

Brian Whitley - , Emission Monitoring Service, Inc. (EMSI)

Description

Description coming soon.

Tiny Habits® and Behavior Design to Transform the EH&S Workspace

Shirley Rivera - , Resource Catalysts

Description

A first-of-its-kind approach, Shirley brings Tiny Habits and Behavior Design to complement existing EH&S practices - think compliance management, training, refreshers, and workspace culture. Behavior Design, a field of study by Stanford Behavior Scientist, BJ Fogg, PhD., is based on a set of models and methods to design solutions that can influence behaviors. Behavior Design shares a similar context - environment, interactions, choice - with behavior-based safety programs, procedures development, and training endeavors. Attendees of this session will learn the Fogg Method and Tiny Habits, which simplifies habit formation. They will self-design three tiny habits that match one’s environment to practice and discover opportunities to apply the method in their workspace and personal lives

Tramp Air Effects on Fired Heaters

Charles Baukal - Energy Leader, Director, John Zink Co. LLC

Description

John Zink Hamworthy Combustion field personnel inspect thousands of burners each year. Too often those flames are not only bad but sometimes potentially dangerous. There are a number of conditions needed for good flames. Burners should be operating at or near their design conditions which includes the excess air and draft levels, and the design firing rate (fuel pressure) and fuel composition. The combustion air must be properly distributed, the fuel must be clean, and both the air and fuel must be properly controlled. The burner and its associated equipment (e.g., tile and pilot) must also be properly installed and maintained. There are some visual indicators that should be checked for proper burner operation. These include uniformity (all flames in a given heater should normally look about the same), proper flame color, no leaning between flames or into process tubes, no pronounced hot spots or dark spots on the burner tiles, no irregular flame movement (e.g., no pulsing), and no unusual sounds (e.g., flashback). Bad flames can lead to increased pollution emissions, reduced thermal efficiency, and unplanned shutdowns. Common reasons for bad flames include improper burner maintenance and operation. Dirty fuel is particularly problematic as it can cause fuel injectors to plug which can create multiple problems. Ugly flames can be dangerous and need to be corrected as soon as possible. Examples of these irregular flames include flame impingement, huffing or pulsing, or severely lifted flames. The purpose of this presentation is to discuss proper burner operation and what good flames look like and then to contrast that with lots of examples of improper burner operation including the causes and corrections. This information can be used in the risk-based inspection and performance monitoring processes. Typically, equipment has a function statement (primary/secondary) and performance objectives and ranges. The consequences when the function of the equipment has failed is documented in the earlier processes.

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TSCA Reform, Take 2: Reconciling Trump’s Deregulatory Agenda and a Congressionally-Mandated Program

Matthew Paulson - Partner, Bracewell, LLP

Description

The presentation will begin with a brief history of the challenges faced by both EPA and industry under the prior statute, how those challenges ultimately set the stage for enactment of the first major amendments to any federal environmental statute in the last quarter century, and the prior Administration’s initial efforts to implement the new law.

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Turnaround LDAR Best Management Practices

Jeff Diehl - , Think Environmental

Description

Description coming soon.

UAS Threat to Critical Infrastructure

Susan Schneider - , DHS CISA Region 6

Description

After years of close coordination, the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) and Departments of Defense, Energy, Justice, and Homeland Security (DOD, DOE, DOJ, and DHS) obtained congressional relief in order to test, operate, and evaluate systems that detect and mitigate unmanned aircraft systems (UAS) in the United States. The National Defense Authorization Acts of 2017 and 2018 granted the DOD and DOE counter-UAS (C-UAS) authorities in 2018 the FAA Reauthorization Act provided DHS and DOJ with their authorities. FAA also received authority in the FAA Reauthorization Act of 2018 to employ CUAS, for test and evaluation. The Act became Pub. L. 115-254 and amends Titles 46 (Domestic Security), 14 (United States Coast Guard), and 49 (Transportation) Preventing Emerging Threats Act of 2018 (“the Act”) authorizing the DHS and DOJ to engage in certain C-UAS activities, notwithstanding provisions of Title 18 and Title 49 that prohibit the interception of communications and interference with aircraft. The Act authorizes DHS and DOJ to conduct C-UAS activities against unmanned aircraft systems (UAS) that poses a credible threat to the safety or security of a “covered facility or asset,” as defined by the Act.

UAVs for Emergency Response; Being Prepared for the Unthinkable – Refinery Response Using UAVs

Johnathan Morrison - , Insight Environmental

Ultra-Low Steam Consumption, High Capacity Smokeless Flare

Clayton Francis - Application Engineering Manager , Zeeco

Description

This paper will introduce the technology behind, test data for, and industry challenges addressed by a new Ultra-Low Steam Consumption, High Capacity Smokeless Flare design developed by Zeeco, Inc. This flare technology is designed to further improve flaring efficiency and reduce steam consumption while continuing to meet the EPA Code of Federal Regulations, Chapter 1, Subchapter C, Part 63, Subpart CC requirements. We will focus on how the design addresses known industry challenges in high capacity, low steam consumption flaring, such as needing the ability to operate at low flare gas pressure since many applications have a maximum flare gas pressure at the flare tip of 3 psig. The paper will detail how this new design can achieve as low as 0.17 lbs. steam / lbs. flare gas at 20% of maximum flow rate, with the maximum flow rate achieved at a flare gas pressure of 3 psig. The above data is based upon a 5 mph wind with less than Ringlemann 1 opacity and a flare gas that is 100% propylene. For smokeless operation with propylene, other current steam assisted flare designs require approximately 0.5 lbs. steam / lbs. flare gas and / or a much higher flare gas pressure at maximum flaring capacity. Ultra-Low Consumption Steam Assisted Flaring is very important since any reduction in the required steam flow rate saves not only money, but also reduces the emissions produced from the production of the required higher steam flows. A key feature of this technology is that the air and steam mixture leave the flare at the same elevation as the flare tip exit, meaning no pre-mixing of air into the flare stream. Other current industry designs mix the air and steam with the flare gas prior to exiting the flare tip, negatively impacting the NHVcz according to the new calculation parameters required by MACT CC. Zeeco’s design more efficiently mixes the steam and air together and then mixes the resulting stream with the flare gas, creating a final mixture with a significantly increased volume of air. When the resulting mixture interacts with the flare gas at the tip exit, the increased air volume is readily available for combustion, meaning the flare is less likely to smoke. Since the design more efficiently mixes the air and steam together, less steam is required to achieve smokeless operation. Furthermore, the inherent efficiency of the mixing delivers a design less dependent upon using flare gas pressure to achieve smokeless operation. The flare can successfully operate at lower gas pressures at maximum flow rate.

Ultrasonic Flowmeters Meeting the Flow Measurement Challenges of MACT RSR 63.670 - From Flare to Steam to Fuel Gas Measurement

Dr. Lei Sui - Global Product Manager, GE, A Baker Hughes Company

Description

Coming soon.

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Upcoming MACT Residual Risk and Technology Reviews - What to Expect and Lessons Learned from the Refinery Sector Rule (RSR)

Rose E. Waypa - , Barr Engineering

Description

EPA has proposed multiple updates to rules following a residual risk and technology review (RTR) that will incorporate 2015 Refinery Sector Rule (RSR) requirements into rules affecting the chemical and petrochemical industries, including facilities subject to the National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAP) for Miscellaneous Organic Chemical Manufacturing (MON), Organic Liquids Distribution (OLD), and Ethylene Production. Proposed rule updates include incorporating new work practice standards (i.e., pressure relief devices and maintenance vents), developing innovative outside-the-unit monitoring techniques (i.e., fenceline monitoring), establishing comprehensive control device operating requirements (i.e., flares), addressing startup and shutdown operations against continuous emissions limits, and modernizing reporting and recordkeeping requirements (i.e.,CEDRI and ERT), all consistent with the final RSR updates. This presentation will focus on lessons learned from the implementation and the first year of compliance with the final RSR updates, and how those lessons learned can be applied to the industries affected by the latest RTRs. The presentation will include a step-wise approach to identifying compliance gaps, developing a work plan, and implementing new monitoring equipment and compliance procedures.

Update on Fugitive Emission Standards for Valves, Packing and Gaskets

Matthew Wasielewski - President, Yarmouth Research and Technology, LLC

Description

Low-E valves and gaskets are now a requirement for most petro/chemical producers in the United States and that requirement is starting to spread world-wide. What test standards should you be specifying for your products, as a manufacturer or an end-user? How are the products tested? The most common laboratory test standards for valves include ISO 15848-1 and API Standards 622, 624 and 641. These standards are used for testing valve packing, linear and quarter-turn valves. This presentation will briefly describe the history of these standards with emphasis on the current published revisions and upcoming revisions. Details of the test parameters, along with the equipment, test setups and methods used to perform these tests will be discussed. In addition, typical failure modes will be examined. Current fugitive emission testing activities of gaskets will also be mentioned. The presentation will provide useful information to the manufacturers, users and purchasers of valves, gaskets and packing

Upstream Oil and Gas Emissions Inventory Calculations

TCEQ - ,

Use of Carbon Dioxide for Effluent and In-Process pH Reduction

Ken Krawczyk, Vince Hartley - Director - Chemical, Environmental, & Tech Solutions, Principal Applications Engineer, Airgas

Description

Industrial gases, such as nitrogen, oxygen and carbon dioxide have been used in environmental applications for many years. One of the most proven environmental applications for industrial gases, and one of the simplest, is the use of carbon dioxide for pH reduction. Typically, this is to allow discharge of water to a receiving waterway for plants that have an NPDES (National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System) permit with pH limits. It can also be applicable for discharge to a local municipality, as well as for in-process needs. The use of Carbon Dioxide in the appropriate pH range can eliminate the need to utilize mineral acids (sulfuric being the most common), with all of the benefits derived from such a change, such as improved safety, improved control, lower maintenance, etc. As an additional advantage, Carbon Dioxide can be less expensive than acid on a pound for pound basis.

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Use of Open Path UV-DOAS as an Alternative Method to Meet Fenceline Monitoring Provisions for Federal Benzene Monitoring Rule - Case Study

Don Gamiles - President, Argos Scientific Inc.

Description

On December 1, 2015 the EPA finalized the Risk and Technology Review for petroleum refineries. Among other things, the finalized rule requires petroleum refineries to conduct fence-line monitoring on a continuous basis. Benzene is the target compound, and an annual average, action level of 9 µg/m3 is established, triggering a refinery lead root cause analysis and corrective action. The fence-line monitoring provisions found in 40 CFR 63.658 describe the use of a network of passive diffusive tube samplers placed along the refinery’s boundary as the primary method for detecting fugitive emissions of benzene. The fence-line monitoring provisions allow a refinery owner or operator to submit a request for an alternative test method, such as open-path instrumentation. The use of this type of technology presents the opportunity to meet the requirements of the rule in a way that is more simplified and cost effective, while offering advantages in terms of potentially identifying and eliminating data points corresponding to outside emission sources. A field validation study has been conducted using latest generation, open-path UV-DOAS technology manufactured by Argos Scientific Inc., to detect benzene at a refinery fence-line on a continuous basis. The study includes a case study on the lessons learned in developing this program.

Use of Process Optimization Methods for Concurrent Evaluation of Plant Economics and Air Compliance

Suresh Raja - Engineering/Air Quality Group Lead, Enercon

Description

Operation of Thermal Oxidizer (TO) Unit utilizes a mixture of air, fuel and effluent stream. Air and fuel and heat content of the effluent stream needs to be in engineered proportions to ensure good combustion. In the oil and gas industry, the production levels vary and optimization of the fuel requirements can save operators money. However, fuel optimization cannot be at the expense of being non-compliant with the National Ambient Air Quality Standards (NAAQS).Therefore, fuel optimizations can be conducted in conjunction with air dispersion modeling to optimize TO operations. This paper will focus on the use of process simulation methods to optimize plant economics in terms of energy use and how results from process simulation can be used concurrently for air compliance with NAAQS using air dispersion modeling (AERMOD).In this work, a combustion model was first developed and used to determine the optimum air-fuel-effluent ratios for good combustion. Once the model was developed, fuel requirements were calculated for different production rates. Emissions and heat release data was then used to compute air impacts using AERMOD and iteratively optimized to comply with NAAQS for SO 2and NO 2 . Such iterative optimization provides a table of fuel and air requirements and associated emissions that provide information for site personnel to comply with NAAQS thresholds for different production rates. The optimization work as result can help operators save money on fuel and operational costs of TO.Please submit a brief summarization (100 words or less) of your paper&#39;s topicThis paper will focus on the use of process simulation methods to optimize plant economics in terms of energy use and how results from process simulation can be used concurrently for air compliance with National Ambient Air Quality Standards (NAAQS) for applicable criteria pollutants. In this work, a combustion model was first developed and used to determine the optimum air-fuel- effluent ratios for good combustion. Once the model was developed, fuel requirements were calculated for different production capacities. Results will be presented from fuel optimization calculations and their iterative use in AERMOD to demonstrate compliance with NAAQS.

Using Calorimeters to Measure the Net Heating Value of Vent Gas

Blair Sullivan - Sales, Vector Controls

Description

Using Calorimeters to Measure the Net Heating Value of Vent Gas: Review the “Requirements for flare control devices” section of the Refinery Sector Rule to understand the use of a calorimeter as an alternative approach to monitoring net heating value Examine paragraphs from the section to understand the impact of Net Heating Value on related calculations Review measurement principals and installation best practices for calorimeters applied to refinery flare measurements

Using Smart Meter Verification to Digitally Transform Environmental Reporting

Meha Jha - Refining Industry Marketing Manager, Emerson Automation Solutions

Description

This presentation will give you an overview of how Digital Transformation is eliminating layers of complexity to bring pre-interpreted field data directly to those who need to make decisions and take action. Environmental reporting involves flow measurements which must be verified to be accurate. Discovery of an inaccurate measurement can be costly for operators as they may pay fines from the last date they can prove accurate measurement. Meter verification tools make it simple and convenient to prove accuracy over time. Operators will be notified of problems immediately to avoid misreporting and allowing for immediate corrective action.

Using The Toxic Release Inventory to Benchmark Environmental Performance in Texas

Dale Rice - Corporate Environmental Engineer, VSP Technologies

Description

The Toxic Release Inventory (TRI) just celebrated its 30th birthday this past year. The TRI which came under the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to-Know Act (EPCRA), has emerged as a powerful tool that provides chemical release data to communities, researchers, industries, state and local environmental agencies, and other stakeholders. TRI data are readily accessible on EPA’s website and can be used for benchmarking, trends analysis, and other purposes. A study has been completed by the author for the 2015 chemical releases in the state of Texas, with a focus on stack and fugitive air emissions. This presentation will provide an overview of the findings from the study including the identification of the most significant pollutants, a breakdown of releases by industry type, comparison of stack and fugitive emissions, methods used for data collection / release estimates, trends looking at prior reporting years, and more. Attendees in major sectors will be able to benchmark against chemical release findings as reported by other industrial companies.

Utilization of In Vitro Fish Cytotoxicity Assays for Use in Whole Effluent Toxicity Testing and Toxicity Identification and Reduction Evaluations

Justin Scott - PhD Student / Research Assistant, Integrative Biology, Oklahoma State University

Description

The clean water act established environmental regulations for wastewater facilities that discharge effluents into native surface waters by requiring them to perform Whole Effluent Toxicity (WET) testing. WET tests are biomonitoring assays that use live laboratory organisms to evaluate effects of potential toxicants to native aquatic populations. Current WET test methods are rather laborious, not very cost effective, and lack detail in identifying the toxicant mode of action. Moreover, the use of live animal testing has become a growing ethical concern. Utilization of cultured fish cell lines offer a high throughput approach, allowing simultaneous measurement of multiple toxicological endpoints. Cell viability is evaluated by indicator dyes that measure cell metabolic activity, lysosomal integrity, and membrane integrity. In this study, we have calculated effect concentrations reducing viability of 50% (EC50s) of 14 toxicants commonly found in wastewater effluent samples and correlated them to lethality in live organisms (LC50) from literature data. Further research for utilizing a polarized epithelia that can be specific to identifying common and emerging contaminants of concern are currently being investigated. Specific cell lines and their mechanistic endpoint responses have shown potential for applications in WET testing, as well as a complementary tool to current toxicity identification and reduction evaluation strategies in wastewater treatment facility operations.

Utilizing Mobile Treatment Systems to Capture Lost Profits Resulting from Flared or Reprocessed Fuels

Sean Kirkpatrick & Jim Woodard - COO & National Sales Account Executive, Vapor Point, LLC

Description

This paper/presentation will focus on how clients have been able to recover fuels that have been routed to flare systems due to specification misses, and how a mobile treatment approach was able to allow refinery clients to not only reduce the VOC and H2S/SO2 load to their flare system, but also recover a saleable product yielding increased profitability. The presentation will also discuss how this mobile technology can be used to supplement refinery hydrotreater operations during outage, helping prevent the requirements for storage and reprocessing of refined products.

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Utilizing Savings, Safety, and Reliability With Energy Surveys

James Nipper - Vice President, Petro Chemical Energy

Description

This presentation will go over the importance of energy surveys such as air & gas leak surveys, steam leak surveys, steam trap surveys, and insulation surveys. The presenter will discuss the importance of doing annual surveys based on information from our companies case studies. He will show how each survey can save you money from an economical view and how each survey can make your plant safer to work in and run more reliable. This is a very simple best practice project that can save your plant money and down time and to keep your employees safer and will help reduce your carbon foot print.

Utilizing Temporary Control Systems to Meet Recent EPA MACT Subpart CC and to Eliminate Flare Gas Recovery Bottlenecks During Maintenance and Turn-Around Activities

Jim Woodard, Sean Kirkpatrick - , Vapor Point, LLC

Description

The implementation of Refinery RTR is creating significant concern to operations, in how they approach equipment deinventory. New MACT standards restricts refiners’ ability to openly purge process equipment to the atmosphere, eliminating the SSM exemption, while placing significant constraints on when units can be opened to the atmosphere. This has resulted in FGR becoming a bottleneck to operators’ ability to deinventory and decontaminate units for maintenance activities, resulting in additional costs in meeting these new standards. Vapor Point has successfully implemented temporary liquid and vapor phase management systems to minimize these impacts, helping operators maintain schedule while reducing cost impacts. This paper/presentation will be focused on how the deployment of mobile technologies can help operators reduce and potentially improve operational execution/efficiency, if implemented correctly.

Utilizing Temporary Control Systems to Meet Recent EPA MACT Subpart CC and to Eliminate Flare Gas Recovery Bottlenecks During Maintenance and Turn-Around Activities

Jim Woodard, Sean Kirkpatrick - , Vapor Point, LLC

Description

The implementation of Refinery RTR is creating significant concern to operations, in how they approach equipment deinventory. New MACT standards restricts refiners’ ability to openly purge process equipment to the atmosphere, eliminating the SSM exemption, while placing significant constraints on when units can be opened to the atmosphere. This has resulted in FGR becoming a bottleneck to operators’ ability to deinventory and decontaminate units for maintenance activities, resulting in additional costs in meeting these new standards. Vapor Point has successfully implemented temporary liquid and vapor phase management systems to minimize these impacts, helping operators maintain schedule while reducing cost impacts. This paper/presentation will be focused on how the deployment of mobile technologies can help operators reduce and potentially improve operational execution/efficiency, if implemented correctly.

Utilizing Vapor Lock Technology for Tank Degassing and Tank Vent Management versus Thermal Destruction or Activated Carbon

Jim Woodard, Jeff St. Amant - , Vapor Point, LLC

Description

State and Local Agency actions have added emphasis to the management of emissions from large API 650 storage tanks, as a result of regulatory action and/or public engagement. In the US most API 650 storage tanks, which are in a service where there is a potential for VOC emissions, have been outfitted with internal floating roofs, which are considered by the EPA as BACT. Historically, tank owners have had requirements for controlling emissions from tanks when existing tank attachments have malfunctioned, or when the tank is being prepared for maintenance activities. Thermal destruction devices are the most commonly used control technologies for managing tank emissions, but they may not be the most efficient or effective. This presentation will review the development of a new Vapor Lock technology for the management of tank emissions during degassing and cleaning operations, demonstrating improved operational performance, while reducing cost impacts to clients.

Vapor Lock Scrubber Technology Reducing Carbon Usage for BWON Compliance

Jim Woodard, Jeff St. Amant - Chief Operations Officer, Vapor Point, LLC

Description

Vapor Point has been contracted by many refining clients, who have been challenged with the proper design of BWON related controls, to determine the most effective control system when considering cost and efficiency. The challenge with many BWON applications is the significant variability in contaminate concentrations which poses challenges in designing the vapor control system. Predominately, activated carbon is considered a BACT for BWON applications, while thermal oxidizers/combustors are also considered BACT, but not as widely utilized. Changing emissions characteristics of a refinery waste system, can render a well-conceived design selection ineffective. This discussion will focus on carbon absorption systems and how incorporating the VaporLockTM under the correct circumstances improves the system design providing improved margins through direct (activated carbon changeouts), and indirect costs savings (unaccounted for man hours for carbon changeouts/exchanges, and environmental management associated with monitoring and NESHAP requirements for new and spent carbon canisters). We’d like to further highlight, that over the past nine years, we have encountered several clients that elected to utilize a combustion device due to the peak loading during high emission events, ultimately recognizing increased costs due to propane/fuel consumption and maintenance downtime due to the operating conditions of the combustion device. This presentation will review a specific application where Vapor Point was enlisted by a Major Gulf Coast Refinery to investigate the ability to decrease carbon usage at a sump emissions control point which was part of the facilities BWON program. Vapor phase carbon is required per the site’s consent decree as the primary control device at various control points across the facility. The client selected one area where a significant increase in carbon consumption had occurred over a period of time. This sump emissions control point was selected as the pilot project for the installation of Vapor Point’s proprietary liquid scrubber system to decrease the loading of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and specifically the benzene on the primary control device, vapor phase carbon.

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Visible Emissions BACT – Digital Monitoring Technique for Opacity

Shawn Dolan - , Virtual Technology

Description

This paper will review 10 years of the evolution of Visible and nuisance emission monitoring process. The evolution overview will include the national and international standards achieved and the operational status of digital visible emission management programs around the world. The paper will address implementation issues encountered and updates made to the standards to accommodate field operations. The paper will address the evolution of camera technology, and the use of the various, hand held, fixed mounted, mobile drones and personal cameras. The paper will explore the various ways these technologies are being used to manage Visible and Nuisance Emission programs around the Globe. The paper will discuss the pro's and con's of the various recording devices and the sources that require opacity monitoring. From the Early Warning System on the Freeway, to the monitoring of visibility on the street corner to estimate PM load, Digital Images continue to excel in the advancement of inexpensive wide area monitors. The paper will conclude with the comparison of the old to the new in terms of information quality and sustainability, while visualizing the path forward over the next decade.

Vista Analytical Lab

Martha Maier - , Vista Analytical Labs

Description

Coming soon.

Waste Heat - a New Profit Center

Loy Sneary - President/CEO, Gulf Coast Green Energy

Description

Gulf Coast Green Energy, Bay City, Texas will make a presentation on their waste heat-to-power solutions for the O&G industry. Solutions discussed will be additional fuel efficiencies for large engines, compressed gas cooling and using flare gas for a beneficial use (making power). All three applications use wasted heat to produce on-site power which reduces the cost of power for the site. The presentation will highlight the successful Dept. of Defense funded project to reduce fuel consumption in large engines. Also highlighted will be the successful flare reduction trial. The project was funded by the Houston Advanced Research Center (HARC) and its Environmentally Friendly Drilling Systems (EFD) and the U.S. Dept. of Energy. Hess Corp. provided the HA-Rolfsrud well pad near Keene N.D. for the trial as well as engineering and electrical expertise. The purpose of the trial was to put flare gas to a beneficial use by using an organic Rankine Cycle generator. EFD and HARC contracted with Gulf Coast Green Energy (GCGE) for the Trial. GCGE is a distributor for the ElectraTherm Power+ Generator which generates power form wasted heat. The presentation will be made by Gulf Coast Green Energy’s CEO Loy Sneary and will include an overview of the projects from design to installation/commissioning, and through the successful sustained operations. Also the Texas A&M on-site environmental assessment will be presented for the flare project which found that the trail had significant emissions reductions compared to the existing flares or gensets which burn flare gas.

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Water Efficiency Evaluations: Approaches and Secondary Impacts

Todd Lusk, D’Ann Wilkins - Senior Engineer, Managing Principal, SLR Consulting

Description

Developing an achievable and sustainable water efficiency program requires a holistic approach and intimate knowledge of water usage within the facility - not only the quantity and quality requirements for internal water usage, but also the secondary impacts of water usage that may not be superficially visible. Implementing a program that encompasses the entire spectrum of water resource management can highlight and identify both procedural and engineering requirements for water reduction initiatives, as well as the potential operational and regulatory effects that may develop from water reuse or reduction. This presentation will describe the core principles used to develop an effective water efficiency plan and address specific issues that can arise from implementation of water reduction efforts, including impacts to other media, effects to in-plant processes, and considerations for end-of-pipe wastewater compliance. The ability to have a comprehensive understanding of the implications and pitfalls to meet compliance requirements to meet water quality requirements and limits are key to maintain consistent compliance for both numerical and narrative standards.

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What to Aggregate: Geographic and Temporal Considerations in Identifying Major Modifications

Eric Groten and Eric Hodek - , Vinson & Elkins and Ramboll

Description

Our presenters will discuss implications of defining your project, both spatially and temporally, for PSD permitting providing some information and insight on aggregation issues and strategies to facilitate project aggregation reviews. The Clean Air Act imposes PSD preconstruction permitting requirements on new major sources or modifications at existing major sources. Determination of “major” in both of these contexts relies on defining the scope of your project, both spatially and temporally. With “aggregation” being informed by state and federal guidance, policy, and case interpretations, project reviews and roles have become quite complex and pose risk to project schedules and economics. This presentation will provide some information insight on aggregation issues and strategies to facilitate project aggregation reviews.

Who Are Your Keepers

Tom Lane - Vice President of HSE, The Miller Group

Description

This presentation will describe how a well meaning experienced temporary worker has changed the world by releasing Killer Bees. It will help Supervisors and Managers understand the importance of training, oversight, and having a workforce that isn't hesitant to ask questions.

Wireless OGI

Omer Yanai - Vice President, Industrial Business Unit, OPGAL

Description

Oilfield digitization has started to change the way decisions are made. While early adopters are employing innovations to the production and processing of product, only a few are applying digitization technologies to address emissions reduction and LDAR operations. Optical Gas Imaging (OGI) cameras are commonly used to detect leaks in the oil&gas industry, but until recently they were used as a stand-alone isolated device. Opgal has recently launched its EyeCGas 2.0 camera which enables wireless connectivity as an enabler for LDAR digitization. In the presentation we will cover the new capabilities and opportunities which are becoming possible with this technology.

You’ve Got PFAS. How to Prepare, Dispose and Respond

Ward Swanson - , Barr Engineering

Description

Per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS) are emerging contaminants of concern in soil, groundwater and drinking water systems. PFAS releases have the potential to impact water supplies and are a challenge to capture and remove. Due to their chemical properties and widespread use, PFAS typically have multiple source areas and can be ubiquitous in most urban areas. For the oil and gas industry, their primary link and liability to the issue is through the training and use of Aqueous Film-Forming Foam (AFFF) concentrates. Most refinery and fuels industry facilities have used AFFF either in training or for fire suppression for the simple fact that AFFF is extremely effective in putting out difficult fires and as a result it saves lives and prevents large scale fire damage. However, due to this use, most facilities likely have a PFAS signature associated with their AFFF releases that can touch multiple areas of their facility. This presentation will provide information on some tools and approaches from simple to complex on how a facility can identify what PFAS may be associated with their use and where it has migrated based on Barr’s nearly 20 years of PFAS investigation including case studies from refining and industrial sites. This presentation will discuss how to inventory current and legacy supply of AFFF containing PFAS and replacement and disposal options. Barr Engineering Co. will also discuss case studies for assisting terminal and refineries identify risks, respond to agency inquiries and prepare for emergency response situations based on our work which has included installation of emergency water treatment systems. Attendees will leave the short presentation with an understanding of the complexity of the chemistry as well as an idea for approaches to audit current PFAS risk and prepare in the event of an emergency where these chemicals are used.

ZEVAC® - Reducing gas released during routine operations & maintenance

Brad Sando - , TPE Midstream

Description

Intentional release of natural gas during routine operations and maintenance has been identified by the US House Pipeline Safety Bill as an area to implement best-available technology for capturing released gas. Make ZEVAC® your BAT/BACT for reducing or eliminating release activity, as it was designed specifically to handle high frequency, low volume events keeping the gas safely in the piping system. Look to ZEVAC® to reduce or eliminate emissions throughout the value chain, whether you’re upstream, gathering, transmission, storage or distribution. For NGL operators, ZEVAC® Q is an industry first compressor technology capable of handling both liquid and vapor phase. Q is a safe alternative to thermal controls and flaring.

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